10/100 & 30Mbps


Hi All.
I have a 30Mbps internet connection. I connect my cable modem directly to my
pc's 10/100 ethernet card and get as good as 30Mbps. So far, so good.
However, when I connect the cable modem to my D-Link DI-614+ and then run a
cable from one of its 10/100 Ethernet ports to the PC's Ethernet 10/100
Ethernet card, the internet speed is halved.
I called D-Link support which I think is in India. They're advice? Turn of
my microwave oven. I am not kidding.
Is it because the router is wirelessly broadcasting the signal or is it due
to some limitation of the router?
Any help is much appreciated.
Neil
Reply to
Neil
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I'm getting about 12Mbps through the router, it prob would be a bit quicker without WEP but not much and looks like it would be capped around 15Mbps by the looks of it - any suggestions for some of these high end consumer units, just so i know what i'm looking for and how much i am going to have to mortgage the house for lol - hey, or is there some other esoteric way to connect my modem to my pc's ethernet card (directly) and then somehow pipe that out to my router so it can be broadcast wirelessly, this way the pc would have the full speed and the wireless laptop would get the slower link which would suit me fine....is there some multi ethernet port card or switch or similar that could do this or am I sounding delirious?
Reply to
Neil
"Neil" hath wroth:
Congrats on the 30Mbits/sec service. I'm still at "only" 1.5Mbits/sec.
1. Microwave ovens leak quite a bit of signal and are far from perfectly shielded. If you need some entertainment, position a spectrum analyzer and antenna facing a tall office building and just watch the noise level increase during lunch time and breaks. It's all from microwave ovens. The IEEE put some effort into 802.11b/g to make it somewhat resistant to microwave interference, but there's only so much that can be done.
2. High thruput routers are available. The reviews on:
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thruput tests. For example, the common WRT54G at:
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about 20Mbits/sec wireless throughput. Looks like they didn't test it with a directly wired connection. Probably faster. Well, the review of the BEFSX41 (no wireless) router at:
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a thruput of 17Mbits/sec. This can be used to eliminate the losers.
Anyway, dive through the reviews.
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see what numbers can be extracted.
3. You'll probably be able to find a router that can do about 30Mbits/sec WAN to LAN thruput. However, as you enable features and filtering, the router will tend to really slow down. For example, enabling software VPN termination in a router will slow it down to well more than half its peak thruput. If you're using WPA2 AES encryption in software, it really eats CPU cycles. Complex filtering rules will also cause a performance hit.
4. Multiport routers are not exactly commodity hardware. However, you can build your own using a PC and one of the Linux based firewall programs. I use Freesco from:
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supports up to 10 network interfaces. I have one router at a customers with a wireless card and 3 ethernet cards installed.
5. Yes, there are 4 port ethernet PCI cards available. For example, Adaptec Quartet ANA-6944A/TX.
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Intel Quad Port:
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are others.
6. My guess(tm) is that you'll need to seperate the router and the wireless boxes. Lots of reasons but the big one is that you're not going to get much peformance out of a commonodity wireless router that shares the CPU with each section. At those speeds, wireless performance will require that the client radios are fairly close to the access point making its locaton an issue.
Reply to
Jeff Liebermann
This is Verizon FIOS?
Is this the router Verizon supplied? Is it running their special x.xxDDM firmware? IME, SOHO routers can't keep up with FIOS speeds...
Reply to
William P.N. Smith
Thanks Steve, I know the microwave can interfere with the wireless signal but here I'm not talking about the wireless signal - it's the degradation of speed in connecting the modem by Rj-45 to the router and then passing the signal back out by Rj-45 to the pc via one of the routers 10/100 ethernet ports. Wireless doesn't come into the equation as far as this direct connection is concerned, which is why D-Link's response suprised me.
Reply to
Neil
This is Cable, Optimum Online Boost
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they don't supply a router, only a modem, i'm now trying to find a router than can supply the throughput I need via its ethernet ports.
Reply to
Neil
The switch supports 100Mbps, not the router. These two devices are logically discrete, although they are physically integrated.
The PIX 501 supports rates of 60Mbps, but a P4 host-based router would probably be cheaper and offer a comparable rate.
Reply to
Dom
That's exactly what I think is affecting the speed, which is confusing because I would have though 10/100Mbps should be able to cope with distributing 30Mbps, but apparently not it seems with my router, I need to find a router that can do what it claims and truly support a 100Mbps connection.
Reply to
Neil
Ah, didn't realize anyone else was doing 30M, it's nice to see some competition in this space.
If you had a DI-624 Rev C I could send you the 4.23DDM firmware that Verizon puts on their FIOS routers, but with no guarantee that it'd work...
They seem to supply a Netgear WGR614 under some circumstances, so they _might_ provide some tech support for that model, but they also say they don't do router tech support at all, and seem to even push tech support for the WGR614 off onto Netgear, so that's a gamble as well.
You are (perhaps unfortunately) on the bleeding edge of >10MB broadband, and running into the envelope on the typical SOHO products. You can try some other modems, but make sure you get them at a place with a good return policy.
Reply to
William P.N. Smith
Thanks for claryfying that Dom and for pointing me in the direction of a product of course, I think I may go with the PIX 501, having said that I haven't seen how much it is lol.
Reply to
Neil
yep - sounds like it...its only on the latest recent high end consumer units that Ive actually seen routed throughput of 25-50Mbps ...some year old models (various brands) are as low as 10-15Mbps ...they just wernt designed for 30Mbps WAN connections :(
Reply to
MM
The microwave & wi-fi transmit on the same frequency 2.4Ghz and a microwave can interfere with the signal.
Reply to
Steve
sounds like the router cannot cope with 30 Mbps.
see if the router stats show anything useful such as errors, or the LAN / WAN ports speeds and duplex, in case something has gone to 100 half duplex, or is running at 10M.
they think PC -> router is using wireless.
i dont know that router in detail, but if you want to go back to them to ask again, try disabling wireless on the router to eliminate wireless as a problem. > > > > Any help is much appreciated. > > > > > > Neil > > > > > The microwave & wi-fi transmit on the same frequency 2.4Ghz and a > microwave can interfere with the signal.
Reply to
stephen
I have a Linksys WRT54GS. The 4 ethernet ports are limited to 100Mbps total even though they're advertised as 10/100 ports. Could something like this be effecting your speed numbers?
Wow, 30Mbps down/2Mbps up for $45/mo (for the first year).
Lance *****
Neil thought carefully and wrote on 1/8/2006 8:37 AM:
Reply to
Lance
Now that's a good idea. It's probably easier to find a wired router that supports the higher throughput.
Currently, I take the ethernet from the cable modem and connect it into the WAN port of the DI-614+, then take a Rj-45 and take it from one of the LAN ports of the DI-614+ back to the PC.
In this plan, I would take the ethernet from the cable modem, plug it into one of the wired routers LAN ports and then take another Rj-45 and connect it to the PC's ethernet card. Then take another Rj-45 from another of the wired routers LAN ports and plug this into the WAN port of the DI-614 so it broadcasts the internet out, yes?
I agree it needs upgrading anyway as it's pretty old now. At the moment I am only getting 12 Mbps max as I can't directly connect the modem without sacrificing the wireless and my daughter's wouldn't have that hence my need to find a solution quick so I can take advantage of the speed.
When it comes to it, what site would you be looking at to stream HD content, or would this be via TV card, I'll have to do it now that you've mentioned it of course!
Reply to
Neil
"Neil" wrote in message
I use DLink and am not suprised at all by their "advice" they gave you. Attempted to get some information about multi-WDS from them once, which was pointless. Ended up finding the answers myself by trial and error. Yep, their "tech support" is a pack of Indian kids with a flow charts, asking if your cables are connected. (But then again, so is Linksys'.)
DI-614+ is an old 802.11b+ (DLink "22 Mbs" 802.11b) animal? Don't know why the LAN ports aren't giving 100 Mbps like they are advertised to (or of any DLink setting that would effect LAN port speeds), but seems silly to try to force an old $20 router/AP to do so. Especially, when you know with certainty that it is bottlenecking your wireless side even if 100 Mbps can be wedged through the LAN ports. 30 Mbps internet? Get a halfway decent wired router and hang the DI-614+ off of it as just a WAP. With 30 Mbps coming in, it still probably won't be long before you want to replace the DI-614+ with an 802.11g/a WAP though!
My internet is "only" 5 Mbps, but also using a seperate router from the WAPs. More convienent, more stable for LAN, more options, etc.
Cheers, Eric
P.S. Envious at your 30 Mbps. :^) Can you stream HD content with that pipe?
Reply to
Eric
Ive tested my WPN824 Netgear rangemax jobbie - can get 48Mbps routed WAN to LAN wired throughput and low to mid 40's wireless - could be worth a try
Reply to
MM
I use it and restrict it to upstream at 256kbps which is fine for catching up. I'm not after broadcast quality for that sort of purpose.
David.
Reply to
David Taylor

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