Wireless motions (DSC)

I have been planning for two years to upgrade with my system with three additional motion detectors. In fact, I already had installers out twice, but they were unable to access my attic either without big ladder or during rain (second time they showed up, finally with a big extension ladder, it was raining). Now, it's gotten even worse since attic access point (outside) has been "sealed". I need to create new indoor attic access point, but that's going to be a big project, probably done years from now.

So I've decided I'm just going to have to use wireless motions. How reliable are these compared to wired kind? My biggest concern is false alarms. I have a DSC system (10 years old) so I assume they will have to use DSC wireless motions. In 10 years, I have no false alarms (well, I actually had one that I think I can explain, some glass broke) and I want to keep it like that.

Do they use 2.2Ghz? I have 2.2Ghz saturation in my house with both

802.11G networking and Sonos. I also use X10 wireless appliance control (work OK, but I often have to put AC line filters on fluorescent lights and LCD tvs to keep it working) and I don't know what frequencies it uses. And radio shack remote extenders (which use RF). And a microwave oven, etc.

Frankly, I hate wireless unreliability, and I use wired whenever possible, but in this case I think I'm going to have to go wireless.

When first installer couldn't access my attic with his short ladder, he suggested wireless, and quoted me a price (higher than wired). I think it requires a new zone, so two previous zones in my 8-zone system will have to be merged to allow for a new zone.

Charles Peterson

Reply to
charlesp
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Reliability shouldn't be an issue with DSC's wireless motions. They'll still false as often as a wired motion of course, and have 30-60 pound (somewhere in there) pet immunity. The newer DSC equipment is at 433 Mhz, which I haven't had any interference issues with. The older stuff is 900 Mhz, just like everything else at that time, so that may be a different story.

Wired is always said to be better, but I think the wireless technology has improved to the point where it's just a matter of whether or not wires can be run.

The wireless motions will each use a separate zone on your system, but they're not restricted to zones 1-8 like the hardwired zones are. I'm assuming you have a 5010 (Power 832) system.

If you don't already have a wireless receiver, you'll need one of those as well, which will also raise the cost of adding the motions.

If it were my house though, I'd go with the wireless.

Reply to
CH®IS

Is your home a single floor house? Does it have a basement? Is the basement finished? Does it have a drop ceiling? Wires can be run from the basement to a first floor .... too.

Also, depending upon where your alarm control panel is, wires may be able to be run in the attic with out having complete access to it. Do you have recessed ceiling lights? Sometimes you can run a wire in the attic by temporarily removing the recessed light cans if they are strategically located.

Although you aren't planning an inside attic entrance right now, there's no reason that a piece of sheet rock couldn't be cut out of the ceiling in a closest just temporarily. It's possible to squeeze though ceiling rafters 16 inch on center and sometimes they are 24 inch on center. If you've got a good installer, he can usually find a way to get a wire where it has to go.

Reply to
Jim

why is it diyers always want to use one of the most expensive and least useful items when it comes to security systems? too much TV? and lots of them too. not just one strategically placed. Seldom do they inquire about adding doors of windows to the system to keep people out. No they always want multiple motion detectors that are more apt to false than switches & that only work after someone has broken in 'if' you are not home at the time and have them turned off. alot of money to spend for inferior part time protection, if you ask me.

Reply to
Bob

Expensive? DSC? Sorry, but I disagree. Wireless motion detedtors are more expensive than their wired counterparts but if there's no access to run new wires then wireless is an acceptable option. As to usefulness, I doubt many installers or DIYers would say that they are not useful.

Anyone familiar with this newsgroup probably knows I'm not particularly fond of DSC but their wireless motion detectors are among the least costly on the market. I can't speak for their performance though since I mostly sell other brands though I do support DSC for clients who already have the system.

Reply to
Robert L Bass

so u think motions cost less than door switch as I stated? OK

As to usefulness, I doubt many

when it comes to keeping burglars out they are useless! because when they activate the perp is already in the house. see what I mean? door and window switches activate when they are standing on the outside. see the difference? did they even have motions way back when u said u were in the trade?

Reply to
Bob

No, I think both have their place in a security system.

The job of an alarm is to detect burglars. Door and window switches should be the first line of defense. Glass break detectors are useful as an adjunct but they're not 100% reliable. Motion detection is useful as a secondary means of detection.

Yes and we agree on that. However, I believe it's a good idea to have more than a single line of defense.

Yep.

I started 30 years ago and yes, we had motion detectors way back then. I'm still in the trade. Can we continue this discussion without turning things personal?

Reply to
Robert L Bass

as do I. as a back up. why do u have to argue about it then.

why would u twist my words? I never said they weren't usefull. are u looking for a flame war?

That is the point I was making. tell your idy buddies not me! doors and windows first, then limited PIRs in strategic areas.

with you twisting my words and attacking my premise while agreeing with it? I doubt it.

Reply to
Bob

and what happens when the burg throws a brick through the sliding glass door and enters without opening the door...then that switch is useless too ain't it?

alarms are for detection...not protection.

Reply to
Crash Gordon

that's when the interior motion detector kicks in numbnut. unless u were using a switch with a glass break built in. what did u think would happen? but u knew that.

Reply to
Bob

dunno, perhaps it was this sentence;

"when it comes to keeping burglars out they are useless! because when they activate the perp is already in the house. "

Reply to
Crash Gordon

wow u can really cut and paste good. did u have a point? or just agreeing with me?

Reply to
Bob

Didn't you originally say they were the "least useful" items? I disagree with you on that. I think they are one of several important elements in a security system.

Nope. You said "least useful" and I took that to mean you don't consider them particularly useful. We disagree.

I understand exactly what you mean. That doesn't make them useless or "least useful."

What is an "idy buddy?" At any rate, Usenet is an open forum -- not a private conversation. Whatever you or I post is read by DIYers and professional installers alike.

Disagreeing is not attacking. Lighten up a little, pal. This isn't a contest.

Reply to
Robert L Bass

He didn't cut and paste. He quoted part of your post. It seems several folks disagree with you on this. In response you say we're all twisting your words, cutting and pasting, etc. You call one poster "numbnut." Do you think there's a slight chance you might be a bit too edgy? Take it easy. No one is trying to denigrate you. :^)

Reply to
Robert L Bass

I was referring to least useful compared to the other item I was talking about, the switch.

only a numbnut would think they are not useful. again I was comparing them to switchs. again, they are more expensive and less useful than switches.

it does in comparison to the other item I was comparing them to. u otoh were trying to make it look like I was referring to least useful compared to all devices. I never mentioned all devices. I mentioned switches and motions. see the difference?

diy

Whatever you or I post is read by DIYers and professional

really? wow you must be a rocket scientist

you agreed with my premise after you attacked it. u need to lighten up, seems like you;re the one in a contest. and I'm not your pal. we all know u want to sell high priced items to unsuspecting diyers. I just think the best system is perimeter with limited and strategic motions and maybe a GB or 2. switches don't cost alot so you tried to challenge my assumptions in order to sell more high priced items to diyers. You'd have them put motions in every room if you could, on that we disagree.

Reply to
Bob

how the fuck do u know if he cut and pasted it? u got espn now? he is a numbnut for getting in the middle of something that had nothing to do with him. If you have something to say to the op then say it. but if you're going to try to start something with me then quit whining when I take you up on it.

Reply to
Bob

Understood. We disagree. They're both useful. Each serves a purpose. One without the other does not make a complete system.

Again, we disagree. They're both important.

You're free to believe that.

I wasn't trying to make anything look either way. Your sentence seemed to imply that. Poor choice of words.

Why is this so important to you? Do you think anyone will think better or worse of you because you think motion detectors are "...least useful items when it comes to security systems?"

"Idy buddy" means DIY? Hmm.

Naah. This stuff isn't rocket science. Any primate can learn it.

I didn't attack you or your premise. I disagree with you about the relative value of motion detectors. No big deal. Feel free to remain in error. :^)

You don't know me at all, friend.

So I guess burgers and fries on the lanai aren't in the offing, eh?

Actually, I prefer to sell less expensive items and more of them. That's why my prices are better than most.

I agree. The only difference is I believe that motion detection is just as important as magnetic sensors. I also like to include glass breaks in appropriate places.

You're making assumptions based upon personal animus rather than fact.

You're wrong again, cousin. In most residential installations I prefer a motion detector in the main hallway or near the foot of the stairs leading to the bedroom level, another in the area where the client's A/V equipment is and (sometimes) one more in a home office.

Reply to
Robert L Bass

I read his post.

Yep. HBO and Showtime, too.

He's participating in a Usenet newsgroup. This isn't a private chat.

Anything posted here isn't directed at a specific person but rather at anyone and everyone who happens to read the post.

No one is trying to start something with you. It appears you're already in high gear over something and I doubt it has anything to do with motion detectors or magnetic sensors. Sorry if I offended you by disagreeing with you.

Reply to
Robert L Bass

Huh?

Reply to
Bob La Londe

My "thought" exactly.

Reply to
Frank Olson

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