Is there any way of forcing it to Acquire Network Address?

Even though I get 4 bars (very good) and he's literally next-door? And I wasn't getting this problem two months ago (yes, it would sometimes not connect but after about ten minutes it eventually would)....
Reply to
Tristán White
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[POSTED TO alt.internet.wireless - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]
Or some other wireless client, which could result in far more grief than the original problem. It's wrong to knowingly cause grief for someone else just to make your own life easier, especially when no real effort has first been made to correct your own problem.
Reply to
John Navas
[POSTED TO alt.internet.wireless - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]
In other words, the advice was bad, because it only crudely attacked the symptom instead of the real problem.
First step is to reboot the router when DHCP fails, and then retry DHCP. If DHCP then works, there is a router problem, in which case the firmware and configuration should be checked carefully.
Reply to
John Navas
[POSTED TO alt.internet.wireless - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]
Yet another reason the advice was bad.
In fact it could be a DHCP issue in the router, a not uncommon problem when cheap routers get overwhelmed (e.g., table overflow).
Reply to
John Navas
[POSTED TO alt.internet.wireless - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]
It might still be a signal (interference) problem, but I don't think so -- see my prior post.
Reply to
John Navas
Which other wireless client? They're using DHCP, there's a handful, they'll keep cycling the beginning of the address pool.
You're imagining a problem which is highly unlikely to occur withing the controlled set of environments described.
Anyway, we're past that now.
David.
Reply to
David Taylor
John, you're on a crusade. The TROUBLESHOOTING advice was just fine, we were trying to rule things out. Get real.
But if it doesn't work with the wireless connection when DHCP is not part of the implementation, that's not the issue now is it? Please keep up! :)
David.
Reply to
David Taylor
FFS, how can it be a DHCP issue when he has configured a static IP address and can't pass traffic? What table overflow are you on about?
Reply to
David Taylor
That I think is the cause of your problem i.e. upgrading to SP2 You will need to re-install your wireless and update drivers.
And if possible or available, try using the wireless adapter own wireless connection control or whatever its called.
SP2 is known for causing problems with DHCP and wireless in general
-aljuhani
Reply to
aljuhani
I have managed to get you the microsoft url, anyway here what they say on that page:
"Working Around Problems with Service Pack 2 Some users in the Windows XP Wireless Networking newsgroup report wireless networking issues after upgrading to SP2. If you haven't installed SP2 yet, you should check your wireless card vendor's Web site for driver updates now, before you install SP2.
If you've already installed SP2 and have wireless networking issues, connect to a wired network and see if there is a driver update available. If there's no update and you must use your wireless card, one option is to uninstall SP2 until there is a new driver for your wireless network card. You must weigh your need for the wireless capability against the added security you lose without SP2. Before you choose to uninstall SP2, read Knowledge Base article 878454, How to help protect your computer if you decide to remove Windows XP Service Pack 2."
formatting link

-aljuhani
Reply to
aljuhani
[POSTED TO alt.internet.wireless - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]
Brother Bob comes to town. In the process of trying to get him up and running, which takes a fair amount of screwing around, they run into an IP conflict with you, which wastes far more time. I know from painful experience that such things happen all the time. See .
Indeed -- the advice proved to be bad.
Reply to
John Navas
[POSTED TO alt.internet.wireless - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]
We really don't know what's going on.
There are a number of tables that can overflow and cause problems; e.g., ARP.
Reply to
John Navas
[POSTED TO alt.internet.wireless - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]
I disagree. Thrashing about and shooting in the dark aren't good ways to solve any problem.
Not necessarily.
With what? All we have are fragmentary reports.
Reply to
John Navas
Weren't thrashing around in the dark. Originally he said when he got connected it worked fine, hence the thread subject. Answer is "sure configure statically". Now it seems that the parameters have changed.
Right, so please offer your theory/solution. How can this possibly be a DHCP problem when his client is configured statically and *still* can't connect?!
David.
Reply to
David Taylor
Right, so one more client is suddenly going to take up a couple of hundred addresses? All that will happen is Brother Bob will get an IP address conflict, his stack will be disabled and if the DHCP server is actually behaving by offering consecutive addresses despite the client requesting the same one, the next time a DHCPRequest is received, the next address will be issued and the problem won't exist.
No, the advice didn't solve the problem because that's now a different problem, doesn't make it bad advice!
David.
Reply to
David Taylor
No but we DO now know that if DHCP is not used, the problem persists, ergo it's NOT a DHCP problem.
I'd pretty much hope that the home router can cope with < double figures ARP tables. Besides, anything flushed from the ARP table will just need to be arp'd for again popping something else off the stack, no problem. Any more? :)
David.
Reply to
David Taylor
Yes, and Microsoft Updates all automatically in place.
Reply to
Tristán White
Actually, it may be an interference problem.
Last night I got it working for the first time in 4 days.
Reading some of the posts in this thread about interference, I wracked my brain to try and think what I have done different in the past week.
I couldn't think of anything. The only thing I had done was change the USB slot that my Bluetooth toggle goes into, from the front of the machine (the blue flashing light at the end of the toggle was becoming annoying when I wanted to watch TV) to one of the many USB ports at the back.
So I moved it back to the front and hey presto, it connected!
It did go down a couple of times, but then would reconnect. So last night I at last managed to do some work! Very exciting.
I don't know whether it was coincidence or not. I find it amazing that a Bluetooth toggle could cause such interference. Especially when it causes none when it's in a different port.
Hopefully this is the answer and tonight it will be working :-)
Reply to
Tristán White
Bluetooth is low power but then try watching a TV programme with your wife constantly nagging quietly in your ear, you'll get the idea. Put her in a different room, end of problem :)
Reply to
David Taylor
Guys please stop arguing, you're making me feel guilty!!
I appreciate all your help, both of you. I'm very impressed by a.i.w. so far. Don't shatter my illusions that this is NOT one of those groups governed by petty squabbles. :-))
Honestly, I really appreciate all the advice.
Reply to
Tristán White

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