Garage Door Opener keypad recommendations

I'm looking for recommendations on a garage door opener keypad. I
normally use a wireless remote / homelink to operate the door, but I want
a keypad as a backup, so that someone cannot be locked out of the house.
My requirements seem simple, but I've had no luck with finding a unit
that meets them:
1. Wired - it will activate the door by triggering the manual pushbutton
circuit
2. No batteries - it must be A/C powered. If it has a back-up battery,
for in case of power failure, that's fine, but I don't want the unit to
fail because the battery died.
3. The relay must be separate from the outdoor keypad. This would
prevent someone from simply ripping the keypad off the wall and shorting
the wires going to it.
4. It must be reliable
A unit exists that meets all of the above requirements except one: a
Genie KEP-1. I've got one of these. In fact, I've had 2, and they have
both died. The first one lasted many years, but it eventually stopped
working. I bought a new one of the same model, and it died within the
first year. I even had the power adapter on a surge suppressor, since I
suspected that might have killed the first one. I it listed on Amazon,
and from reading the reviews, it seems many others have had reliability
problems with the KEP-1.
So I'm looking for a similar device, but one that will last more than a
few months. It seems that everything else I find is battery powered, and
most of them are wireless. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
Reply to
George
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Get a standard, secure, wireless, keypad, battery operated unit, available almost every hardware store that links via rolling code passwords each usage. They come with every garage door opener that isn't bottom end quality and work very reliably.
Change the battery every couple of years so it works reliably without any voltage spikes from the dirty grid power in your home.
I'm looking for recommendations on a garage door opener keypad. I normally use a wireless remote / homelink to operate the door, but I want a keypad as a backup, so that someone cannot be locked out of the house.
My requirements seem simple, but I've had no luck with finding a unit that meets them:
1. Wired - it will activate the door by triggering the manual pushbutton circuit
2. No batteries - it must be A/C powered. If it has a back-up battery, for in case of power failure, that's fine, but I don't want the unit to fail because the battery died.
3. The relay must be separate from the outdoor keypad. This would prevent someone from simply ripping the keypad off the wall and shorting the wires going to it.
4. It must be reliable
A unit exists that meets all of the above requirements except one: a Genie KEP-1. I've got one of these. In fact, I've had 2, and they have both died. The first one lasted many years, but it eventually stopped working. I bought a new one of the same model, and it died within the first year. I even had the power adapter on a surge suppressor, since I suspected that might have killed the first one. I it listed on Amazon, and from reading the reviews, it seems many others have had reliability problems with the KEP-1.
So I'm looking for a similar device, but one that will last more than a few months. It seems that everything else I find is battery powered, and most of them are wireless. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
Reply to
Josepi
I've always been curious, how many garage door openers can the rolling code systems be programmed to remember? Is it a small number, or much larger than you would ever need?
Best, Christopher
Reply to
Christopher Glaeser
I am not sure but mine will take a few...at least one from each garage door opener, so three or more.
I've always been curious, how many garage door openers can the rolling code systems be programmed to remember? Is it a small number, or much larger than you would ever need?
Best, Christopher
Reply to
Josepi
Oh...and plus the keypad on the end of the one doorframe...so four or more.
I am not sure but mine will take a few...at least one from each garage door opener, so three or more.
I've always been curious, how many garage door openers can the rolling code systems be programmed to remember? Is it a small number, or much larger than you would ever need?
Best, Christopher
Reply to
Josepi
Both my Sears garage operator and my Door King gate operators use the 315MHz rolling codes system and the receiver manual says it has two modes: one for 15 remotes in high security mode and the other for 31 remotes in normal mode. I don't recall which way I set the jumpers on my LiftMaster 312HM receivers.
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Tony
Reply to
Anthony R. Gold
I agree. I use a wireless keypad unit.
If the OP is really worried about being locked out, he could put a key inside a false rock for a few dollars. The false rock is available at Amazon, as is the keypad. He could also install two wireless garage door openers. They are cheap enough, and having two virtually gurantess the batteries will be good in one of them.
I've never had the batteries go bad in mine, and it has been installed since 2003. Maybe I'll splurge and do it.
Reply to
Jim H
He could also go in another door and release the drive lock and then open the garage door manually.
I agree. I use a wireless keypad unit.
If the OP is really worried about being locked out, he could put a key inside a false rock for a few dollars. The false rock is available at Amazon, as is the keypad. He could also install two wireless garage door openers. They are cheap enough, and having two virtually gurantess the batteries will be good in one of them.
I've never had the batteries go bad in mine, and it has been installed since 2003. Maybe I'll splurge and do it.
Reply to
Josepi
Or if there is no other door, then this $12 no-fail device works:
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Reply to
G. Morgan
That would definitely enable access, come hell or high water. Two doors with two remotes would also do it but when the power fails your link would be the best, barring a second entrance / man-door.
Or if there is no other door, then this $12 no-fail device works:
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"Josepi" wrote: He could also go in another door and release the drive lock and then open the garage door manually.
Reply to
Josepi
Assuming, of course, the garage door spring does not break. I had a spring failure on a wooden double wide a couple years ago. That's when I got a real appreciation for the weight of these doors.
Best, Christopher
Reply to
Christopher Glaeser
So now you want to plan on a power outage and a spring breaking simultaneously?
Uh huh....
Reply to
G. Morgan
Some folks wear a belt AND suspenders...
He forgot to mention that all the bearings on all the rollers could seize up - THEN what? Better keep a hi-lo around just in case...
Reply to
JoeRaisin
That is a good reminder of the utility of a mechanically operated door release in case of a power failure. I used to have one in my detached garage before I put in a back door.
As you pointed out in another message, others seem to have started to assume that the op is paranoid of being unable to get into the garage under any circumstances through the garage door.
Actually, he is just trying to find a reasonable ability to have a reliable way in, IN CASE SOMEONE DOESN'T HAVE A KEY HANDY. If he doesn't have the house key handy, he is also not likely to have the opener key handy.
My girlfriend likes to take walks in the evening and frequently heads out without her key (I don't have a door key but have my remote programmed to open the garage door which lets me get into the house if I have my car). I have considered buying her a keypad just so that we don't need to leave a door unlocked (safe neighborhood) or I could just get a copy of her key to keep in my wallet.
For the extreme people how about a locked box (with mechanical push button lock) that has power wired to it and a battery operated saw (on a trickle charger) so that the op can cut their way into the garage under any circumstances.
Reply to
Bill Fuhrmann
Have you considered attaching a key lockbox (like real-estate agents use) with a key to the house? Other than that, I think the battery operated keypad opener would be good with a periodic reminder to change the battery or with a slight amount of work to make up an AC operated power supply to put in place of the battery.
Reply to
Bill Fuhrmann
Ah, I thought it was Chris. He hijacked it.
Blow me.
Reply to
G. Morgan
Something like this would probably work, its overkill for what you are looking for and its really designed to be used with a card and a pin, but I believe you can use it just with a pin.
I'm not sure what price range you are looking at but this unit runs somewhere around $200
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Doug
Reply to
Doug
Trouble with a lock box or any combination lock is that it has to be used on a regular basis.
What was your locker combination in highschool?
Have you considered attaching a key lockbox (like real-estate agents use) with a key to the house? Other than that, I think the battery operated keypad opener would be good with a periodic reminder to change the battery or with a slight amount of work to make up an AC operated power supply to put in place of the battery.
Reply to
Josepi
Power or no power, if the spring breaks, you can't open my garage doors without the aid of some type of jack. There are handles on the inside, but from the outside, even two people can't open my doors.
Best, Christopher
Reply to
Christopher Glaeser
Garage door motors are not designed to lift large wooden double-wide doors without considerable assistance. The springs act as a counter-balance, and if the spring breaks, the motor can not lift these heavy doors. Some doors weigh as much as 350 to 450 pounds, and if the spring breaks on a single point of entry, then entry may be challenging.
Best, Christopher
Reply to
Christopher Glaeser

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