DSC Power832

Hello! My recently purchased foreclosed home has a Power832 system installed. To the best of my (limited) knowledge, I have a PC5580Z keypad (photo here:

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a PC5010 control board. I had zero information on it, so I did some Googling and found the installation manual, operating manual, keypad manual and programming worksheet. This is all well and good so far, but I've come to discover that the programming process seems to be somewhat complex.

My setup seems pretty simple to me, three doors (front, back and garage entry), garage attic, motion in living/dining common areas, carbon monoxide detector and glass break in the garage. It's setup like this:

Zone 01 - Front Door (Entry/Exit) Zone 02 - Read Door Zone 03 - Garage Entry Door Zone 04 - Garage Attic Door Zone 05 - Motion Zone 06 - CO Detector Zone 07 - Garage Glass Break Zone 08 - Null

What is the bare minimum I need to program to get this working? The programming worksheet has all kinds of stuff that I'm not even sure is relevant.

Bonus: How hard would it be for me to upgrade the keypad to a newer LCD version?

Thanks in advance, security system gurus!

Reply to
Chris Moore
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and a PC5010 control board. I had zero information on it, so I did

Actually, DSC is one of the easiest panels to program (for most rocket scientists). :-)

Can you even access installer level programming?? If so, you'll want to reset the installer and master codes. You might also want to make sure your siren time-out is set at four minutes. As for actual zone programming, the zone options are detailed in the programming work sheets.

Simple. Power down your system. Remove keypad from wall. Remove four wires from terminal block. Wire up new keypad, and mount on wall. Power up system. Programming the LCD descriptors can be a bit time consuming if you're using the "finger" method (keypad programming). It's a bit quicker using DLS.

Reply to
Frank Olson

There are two version of the PC5010. Version 1 and Version 2. Version 2 is the most recent. Do you know which one you have? Neither are current production models.

I think you mean a PC 5508Z LED keypad.

There are several versions of the LCD keypad. There is the older PC5501Z that uses fixed English as well as the newer PK series PK5501Z fixed English (Needs version 2 of PC 5010). There is also an RF version of both PC and PK keypads (meaning it has a built in wireless receiver) if you care to add a wireless panic button or additional wireless zones.

There is the custom English keypad the PC5500Z or PK5500Z. There is an RF version of the PK series keypad.

If you add a custom English keypad it will need to be addressed and enrolled properly. If you add a RF keypad it will have to be addressed and the wireless module enrolled properly too.

As a practical matter considering the cost of adding a single custom English keypad versus obtaining a new PC1832 kit containing the new custom English keypad is a quite small difference. If you get the kit it comes with a new battery (which I suspect you'll need) new transformer etc.

According to DSC most DSC gear is installed by dealers that use the finger bone method of keypad programming. Those dealers will swear by all that is holy it is the fastest and best method of programming a panel. I have taken over many such systems that have been hand programmed. I have never seen one hand programmed DSC panel that didn't have at least one serious programming error flagged by the software. If your panel is hooked to a phone line it would be easier to program it remotely for you with DLS software rather than try and talk you through it, especially if you want to have custom English text in the keypad.

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and a PC5010 control board. I had zero information on it, so I did

Reply to
Roland Moore

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and a PC5010 control board. I had zero information on it, so I did

This guru says use your limited knowledge to contact a qualified alarm installer to reprogram your system

If you don't some guy named Jack Stevens will come to your house and pull your head off...I'm serious

Reply to
Mark Leuck

here:

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> and a PC5010 control board. I had zero information on it, so I did

Yes, when I defaulted the system I was able to reset the installer and master codes. So far, it seems like the best idea is to either do more research on this DLS mentioned below or find someone skilled in the art of DSC programming who would help me out for $$$. I'll keep trying.

Thanks.

Reply to
Chris Moore

Must be a lot of boneheads in your area.

Reply to
alarman

From a homeowner's perspective, DLS would be an extreme waste of time and money. It would be less expensive to either study the manual and figure it out (especially since the programming can be reset knowing that you won't be locked out of the panel), or get someone to do it for you. Everyone here thinks DLS is so wonderful because they already have it, along with all the equipment for it, and knows how to use it.

When I first started out as an apprentice, I was given a Power832 to take home and get the hang of programming and see what everything does and all that kinda stuff. It only took half an hour or so to get it programmed and working properly then, and it only takes 2 - 3 minutes to program one now.

The best option, however, may be to get a small local company to come by and program everything for you. That way you'll know it's done properly. If they won't do it without signing you up for monitoring you've found the wrong company. Plus that way you'll have someone you know to call if you need some work done on it in the future. I wouldn't expect to pay more than $100 for this, probably closer to half that.

And as far as your keypad goes, it would be very easy to change to something better. The 5501z is the standard choice for most, but some like the added functionality of the 5500z. And of course there's all the other options that Roland already mentioned.

If you do choose to program it yourself, I would recommend printing out the programming worksheets and writing everything down first before making any changes. If you get stuck on anything, just ask and this group can definitely help you get through the programming.

- Chris

Reply to
CH®IS

Find a company who will come to your home, properly program an alarm control, assume the liability for the operation of the system, and expect that company to do this for $50, with no monitoring contract?

I'm guessing you'll be voting for Hillary.

js

Reply to
alarman

Any liability would clearly be with the homeowner. Naturally any issues a tech discovers should be discussed with the homeowner. After programming, a full system test would be the obvious next step (may as well throw out the CO detector, if I can't test it I don't trust it).

It's an 832 which sounds like it isn't monitored. Arm it, set it off, make sure everything went into alarm, there ya go.

And $50 for 3 minutes of programming and another few minutes of testing on a defaulted 832? Is it that hard to imagine?

- Chris

Reply to
CH®IS

My rates are fairly low compared to some here nad i wouldn't do it for that. Not to roll a truck, program the system, and test it out.

Reply to
motley me

Any liability would clearly be with the homeowner? You are very naive. The liability would certainly rest with the last poor schmuck who worked on the system. And no contract, remember, so my house go bye-bye. And you are going to shitcan their CO detector? Expain that at the civil trial while their attorney has your balls on the chopping block. And now you are including a full system test. How much time do you imagine this little programming mission will take?

Well, lets see...we drive to your house, let's say 1/2 hour. Your programming time of three minutes is unrealistic, since the system would need to be fully checked to see how the zones need to be configured so that we know HOW to program the system, minimum 1/2 hour. Now we do the programming, test the system, demonstrate it, another 1/2 hour minimum. This is if all goes well of course, which it never does. Just after you finish the demo to the Mrs., Mr. homeowner comes home and you'll need to do it again. And when was the last time you went to reactivate an existing system and everything worked perfectly? It doesn't happen that way, repairs and/or adjustments will almost certainly need to be made, so another 1/2 hour, minimum. Now I have a BARE MINIMUM of 2 hours invested in this project, have assumed liability for the entire system, (no contract, remember), and all for $50. Out of this, I pay for gasoline, service truck, vehicle, liability, and E/O insurance, telephone, licensing, taxes, tools, etc.

Sure, nothing to it, Skippy. What planet are you from?

js

Reply to
alarman

LOL!

Reply to
Mark Leuck

If it's in town here it'll be half that at most (small city). Out of town, we'll either charge for travel or we'll add it to a day when we're in that area. If you're in a larger city (as you most likely are), half an hour is a good start.

In this case, the zone list is written on the keypad, and nothing appears to be scratched out or added. Check the panel to ensure there are still only 7 zones and it's not a rat's nest of wire to be a little more confident.

I'll give you 5 minutes to have a look at the system, 3 minutes to program, another 5 minutes for testing, training (with a competent user) should be less than 5 minutes. So I'm up to 18 minutes for all that. Did you have lunch with them during the training?

I'll give you that one. Always depends on the original installation.

So another 5 minutes? I find that the one who was there will often explain it all to the one who wasn't, so I just listen in to make sure they don't screw it up.

I've done at least 3 in the past couple of weeks that were perfect. One almost perfectly, except it needed a new surface contact. Then again, we don't have a door knocker in the area to install crap either, I assume most people on here do.

You have a bare minimum of 2 hours. I have a bare minimum of 38 minutes, plus a couple more here and there for the chatty types you'll inevitably run into when you're in a hurry. I'm still missing your point on the liability issues (just an installer, I don't run the company). No contract means less paperwork and less time. I'll pay a little in gas, you'll be stuck in traffic for your extra 82 minutes paying more for gas. As for the rest of it, it's all part of the business. If you weren't paying it, you wouldn't be getting paid.

- Chris

Reply to
CH®IS

OK, now I understand. When (if) you run your own business, so will you.

Reply to
alarman

First, I never meant to begin a heated debate on the pros and cons of monitoring vs. paying someone cash to program my system. However, thank you to Chris, Roland and Frank who helped me out.

I took some time, messed around and have it programmed. To be perfectly honest all I want to do with the damn thing is tie it in with my Linux server and work on a "home-grown" security system to tie in with my video monitoring setup. It's just a hobby, but I do actually have an interest in how the whole thing works.

Chris

Reply to
Chris Moore

The software is available free. You need a compatible modem to use it, though. If you want the software contact me. I've programmed a few of the Power832 systems and they're not difficult. I can help you understand the terminology and options if you like.

You can do the job using the hardware you have or you can upgrade the keypad. Do the upgrade only if you want/need the better keypad -- not just to facilitate programming -- since it can be done either way.

Reply to
Robert L Bass

Reply to
Roland Moore

No c> >

Reply to
Roland Moore

Reply to
Roland Moore

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