How could a landline be re-routed?

this happened to me.. i kept getting calls from one phone number
always at times i was not home. i kept trying it for months until one
day i tried it from work. then someone answered it and i heard sounds
from the building i was working in! i ran down to where it was and saw
an abandoned phone off the hook. someone said an off-premise extension
might have been used. It seems as if someone was routing calls through
a third party or being intercepted at my house, as many friends,
including those with ties to law enforcement, commented on my phone
being tapped.
another time i had a lucent digital answering machine that was powered
OFF and the phone rang several times. The machine turned ON and an
intercom feature in the unit was activated.
i have never had criminal issues so i feel my phone line was violated
and wonder what may have happened.
Reply to
seeker
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Relax. The old Lucent answering machine is designed to turn on after 10 rings in case you left it off. It also has the listen in feature. Read the manual on that one. As for the line, it sounds like you live fairly close to your office. Contrary to popular belief, there is not a single pair of wires that runs from your home to the central office. Your line could have been assigned a pair that was not dead at the other end. A call to the telco should get things sorted out.
seeker wrote:
Reply to
BruceR
Indeed, and serviced by the same central office.
In most cases there is. Or at least from your phone to the nearest SLC.
Um, what? Of course it's /supposed to/ be a single pair for the line. At least in most set ups. What are you talking about here?
Reply to
Bill Kearney
Actually the pair from your home to the CO is a collection of pairs connected to one another. Pair from house to street cable connected at pole or underground pedestal. The street cable is connected to a larger cable that runs along a major street and so on to create a single pair back to the CO. Of course, that's the old fashoned way. Now you are likely to be connected to a fibre concentrator well before hitting the CO.
What I mean is this: Let's say that I live at 123 Maple St. and you live at 234 Maple St. There is a 100 pair cable serving the street. I have a phone number that comes to me on pair 57 of that cable but I have it disconnected because I'm happy using just my cellphone now. You order a new line from the telco. They assign your number to what is now a vacant pair on that cable, pair 57. The installer connects your drop cable to pair 57 at the pedestal and voila, you have phone service. If I leave my old dead phone plugged in and the installer doesn't stop at my place to disconnect my drop from pair 57 then I too have your new phone number working at my place. This happens far more often than the telcos will admit. It is a real problem in office buildings. I can't tell you how often I've found other companies lines appearing in a suite that isn't theirs.
Reply to
BruceR
Bruce is correct here. I've seen it numerous times in commercial premises. There will be one or more 200-pair bundles, all punched down to 66-blocks in the phone room. Checking with a telephone butt set you will find lines connected to other business in nearby buildings.
Reply to
Robert L Bass
Yes, but there'd still be ONE pair for the POTS line leading from your house to the nearest piece of equipment. Once upon a time that would have been the central office. Yes, you'd be pulling one pair up to the pole (possible inside a multi-pair overhead line). From there it'd probably get spliced into a multi-pair cable. Possibly again when that cable lead underground to a larger bundle going back to the central office. Binding post charts detail all of this. There are all sorts of ways the pairs can get screwed up.
Ah, then you're talking about incompetence on the part of the worker (who may or may not be an 'employee' of the telco). I've certainly seen plenty of situations where an office building had distribution points throughout the building that had pairs from other businesses running through it. Not since the days of Centrex handselt have I seen the wrong lines ringing at handsets. Now most lines run into PBX equipment of one sort of another. It'd be odd to have both the pairs setup wrong AND the PBX configured to use the wrong trunks. Not impossible, but a lot less likely than in the past.
The message posted wasn't really clear on what was actually happening, or even when.
Reply to
Bill Kearney
If it were a small business they may just have a key system instead of a PBX, the difference being that the CO lines for a key system appear on the phones.
Reply to
BruceR
I was living within 10 miles of where i worked and my understanding is that an off-premise extension includes the home phone into the broader PBX business line, so extensions could tap into the home line off of that
Reply to
seeker
Sorry, I don't follow what you're explaning.
Reply to
BruceR
You're using terms that don't quite match up with telco terminology.
Any number of things are possible depending on how you have service from your telco. It's trivial to do call forwarding to re-route an extension at work out to another phone number. But unless you're using the ILEC for the PBX services it's not as easy (nigh on impossible) to have that remote number act as an outgoing extension.
Reply to
Bill Kearney
so they heard you coming and ran off?
Reply to
CWatters

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