Heard From An Old ASAer Today

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I told him he should stop in here and say hi.  He says he's retired now.

I may stop by and see him in the mid later winter.  Looking at doing a  
Caribbean cruise with my wife for our 25th.  Probably launch out a port  
in his home state rather than freeze our tushies off sailing down the  
eastern seaboard.


Re: Heard From An Old ASAer Today
On Tuesday, October 16, 2018 at 7:23:05 PM UTC-4, Bob La Londe wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
  
Quoted text here. Click to load it

I've traveled the Caribbean for many many years. Starting back in the 60's  
right up through the 2000's. We bare boat chartered at least 25/30 times. (
 for the non-sailors out there that means we rented a big sail boat and sai
led it ourselves without a captain) Most of our sailing was done in the Bri
tish Virgin Islands but we also sailed from St Vincent to Granada and back  
on a 10 day excursion, stopping at dozens of islands on the way. We sailed  
St Martin and surrounding waters. US Virgin Islands, Honduras Bay Islands a
nd many other places to numerous to remember now. Now days we just fly to a
n Island and rent a car. We always make it a point to go on a sail with a p
rivate captain as a reminisce of our sailing days. Our sailing days are ove
r now. I don't have the speed, agility or stamina any longer and my navigat
ion skills are slowly slipping from memory. It sure was a great run though.
 Memories and stories up the yazoo. I also was stationed on an Island in th
e Bahamas when I was in the US Navy back in the 50's and did a tremendous a
mount of scuba diving, so that always was a side adventure on all of our sa
iling trips. I was on the Navy spearfishing diving team competing on Grand  
Bahama. Diving in the Bay Island off of Honduras and in the Caymans is just
 indescribable.

People keep telling me that ship cruses are fun but needless to say, after  
sailing a 60 foot yawl with 4 to 6 sailors for all those years, I think tha
t ship cruising is for landlubbers and I just can't bring myself to go on a
 boat trip with 5000 of my closest friends. I just have this feeling that t
here is at least one out of those 5000 people that would get in my face and
 either he or I would go overboard.  

Don't mean to belittle your trip Bob ?? just story telling.

The best Islands as far a people go are Grand Cayman and Barbados. The peop
le are just great. They know that tourism is their source of income and tre
at it accordingly with respect. They are helpful, pleasant and want you to  
enjoy their beautiful islands. St Thomas has turned into strictly a tourist
 trap. We used to stop in Charlotte Amali to pick up water and supplies. A  
couple of times we went down to where the cruse ships come in and it was al
most a mob scene when the tourists cam off the boat. All the natives trying
 to sell their overprice cheap crap souvenirs. And that was 20 years ago. C
an't imagine what it's like now. I understand that the Rastafarians have ju
st about taken over the whole Island. I had some friends go there to rent a
 villa and one night they witnessed a gun fight with cars racing around the
 town. Not just hand guns but machine guns. St Martin is pretty good. The D
utch side is where all the shops are but the French side has the great rest
aurants. St Johns in the British Virgin Islands is pretty good too but I do
n't think cruise ships stop there. As a matter of fact all the islands in t
he BVI are pretty good. Went to Puerto Rico once and would never go back ag
ain. St Croix is good too but kind of small and out of the way for cruise s
hips. St Vincent has a volcano on it and not too much else. The Yucatan Pen
insula has some good places. Cozumel was OK but it's a popular place for th
e college kids. Oh Yeah, make sure you don't time your trip during college  
break. First of all the prices skyrocket and the kids will get on your nerv
es pretty quick. As much as it's advertised, Aruba and Curacao have got no  
sights to see. Barren Island with hardly any tropical looking areas. Mostly
 bare coral and cactus and lots of goats, gambling, shopping, restaurants a
nd condos

That's about all I can think of right now. If you have an specific question
s let me know.

Re: Heard From An Old ASAer Today
On 10/19/2018 12:29 AM, Jim Davis wrote:
> On Tuesday
, October 16, 2018 at 7:23:05 PM UTC-4, Bob La Londe w
rote:
>> I told him he should stop in here and say hi

.  He says he's retired now.
>>
>> I may stop by and
 see him in the mid later winter.  Looking at doing a

>> Caribbean cruise with my wife for our 25th.  Proba

bly launch out a port
>> in his home state rather tha
n freeze our tushies off sailing down the
>> eastern
seaboard.
>  
> I've traveled the Caribbean for many

many years. Starting back in the 60's right up through
 the 2000's. We bare boat chartered at least 25/30 tim
es. ( for the non-sailors out there that means we rent
ed a big sail boat and sailed it ourselves without a c
aptain) Most of our sailing was done in the British Vi
rgin Islands but we also sailed from St Vincent to Gra
nada and back on a 10 day excursion, stopping at dozen
s of islands on the way. We sailed St Martin and surro
unding waters. US Virgin Islands, Honduras Bay Islands
 and many other places to numerous to remember now. No
w days we just fly to an Island and rent a car. We alw
ays make it a point to go on a sail with a private cap
tain as a reminisce of our sailing days. Our sailing d
ays are over now. I don't have the speed, agility or s
tamina any longer and my navigation skills are slowly
slipping from memory. It sure was a great run though.
Memories and stories up the yazoo. I also was statione
d on an Island in the Bahamas when I was in the US Nav
y back in the 50's and did a tremendous amount of scub
a diving, so that always was a side adventure on all o
f our sailing trips. I was on the Navy spearfishing di
ving team competing on Grand Bahama. Diving in the Bay
 Island off of Honduras and in the Caymans is just ind
escribable.
>  
> People keep telling me that ship cr

uses are fun but needless to say, after sailing a 60 f
oot yawl with 4 to 6 sailors for all those years, I th
ink that ship cruising is for landlubbers and I just c
an't bring myself to go on a boat trip with 5000 of my
 closest friends. I just have this feeling that there
is at least one out of those 5000 people that would ge
t in my face and either he or I would go overboard.
>
  
> Don't mean to belittle your trip Bob ?? just
story telling.
>  
> The best Islands as far a people
 go are Grand Cayman and Barbados. The people are just
 great. They know that tourism is their source of inco
me and treat it accordingly with respect. They are hel
pful, pleasant and want you to enjoy their beautiful i
slands. St Thomas has turned into strictly a tourist t
rap. We used to stop in Charlotte Amali to pick up wat
er and supplies. A couple of times we went down to whe
re the cruse ships come in and it was almost a mob sce
ne when the tourists cam off the boat. All the natives
 trying to sell their overprice cheap crap souvenirs.
And that was 20 years ago. Can't imagine what it's lik
e now. I understand that the Rastafarians have just ab
out taken over the whole Island. I had some friends go
 there to rent a villa and one night they witnessed a
gun fight with cars racing around the town. Not just h
and guns but machine guns. St Martin is pretty good. T
he Dutch side is where all the shops are but the Frenc
h side has the great restaurants. St Johns in the Brit
ish Virgin Islands is pretty good too but I don't thin
k cruise ships stop there. As a matter of fact all the
 islands in the BVI are pretty good. Went to Puerto Ri
co once and would never go back again. St Croix is goo
d too but kind of small and out of the way for cruise
ships. St Vincent has a volcano on it and not too much
 else. The Yucatan Peninsula has some good places. Coz
umel was OK but it's a popular place for the college k
ids. Oh Yeah, make sure you don't time your trip durin
g college break. First of all the prices skyrocket and
 the kids will get on your nerves pretty quick. As muc
h as it's advertised, Aruba and Curacao have got no si
ghts to see. Barren Island with hardly any tropical lo
oking areas. Mostly bare coral and cactus and lots of
goats, gambling, shopping, restaurants and condos
>  

> That's about all I can think of right now. If you h

ave an specific questions let me know.
>  
 
Jim,
 

That is very impressive and congrats to you for the ex
periences and  
adventures you have enjoyed.  I too am
 former US Navy in the mid 60's,
half way around the
globe, Shellback and other experiences, and I had
sim
ilar thoughts quite some time ago about renting a sail
boat as you
have done.  Ahhhh the ADVENTURES I would
have had..............
 
When I brought the "thought"
 up to my wife, it all ended in a couple of
micro sec
onds...........................
 
Thanks for typing w
hat might have been my experiences as well.
I might s
hare with my wife.................... or not..........
......
 
Have a good weekend.
 
Les


Re: Heard From An Old ASAer Today
On Saturday, October 20, 2018 at 8:45:55 AM UTC-4, ABLE1 wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Would you believe that I never was stationed on a ship?

This was back in the 50's. I was in communications and when I got out of tr
aining school at Bainbridge, myself and 4 other buddies I'd hooked up with  
and became friends with in boot training all coincidently got billeted to g
o to cryptography school in Norfolk Va. We passed top secret clearance and  
then surprisingly we were put in for Atomic top secret clearance. We didn't
 have a clue where they were going to send us. We wound up on an Island in  
the Bahamas where there was a submarine tracking station set up using hydro
phones laid off the continental shelf of the island. Sonar men could pick u
p and translate ships propeller signatures off the coast of Portugal and Af
rica. The premise was ?. with visual sightings and commercial shipp
ing schedules, which ships and their whereabouts in that area could be know
n and assigned prop signatures. Anything that didn't coincide with known in
tel was considered a Soviet Atomic submarine and tracked and eventually ide
ntified. Both the east and west coast of the US had total coverage with bas
es from Nova Scotia to Grand Turks Island on the east coast. It's all been  
disbanded now and I just can't imagine what they have implemented now days.
 We were all armed and had regular arms practice. Was pretty serious busine
ss for a 17 year old kid.

On the UP side however. I was stationed on a tropical paradise. Took up scu
ba diving before Jacques Cousteau was a known celebrity. Spearfishing was a
llowed anywhere. I've speared 7foot sting ray, numerous shark, barracuda ab
out 6 foot long. Our watch schedule was just super. We had 5 day watches, 2
4 hours off, 5 eve watches, 24 hours off and 5 mid watches. Then 7 days off
. We'd either get a MAPS flight to Florida or we would get the mechanic to  
lay up a jeep "waiting for repair parts" and sneak a jeep out of the motor  
pool and drive down the beach for a week. We'd load up the jeep with a coup
le of "shitcans" of ice, beer and food and all our diving gear. Live on the
 beach for a week. There were old abandoned plantations where we could pick
 pineapples, mangoes, bananas, and of course coconuts to supplement the foo
d we brought and what we could spear and we cooked eveything in wash pails  
and campfires on the beach. It's amazing how you can get used to the no-see
-ums and the land crabs when you're sleeping on the beach. Whenever the Cap
tain of the base had visits from Command, he would "authorize" a "island ar
ea surveillance boat trip" in the base LST (small landing boat). The "crew"
 coincidently consisted of the best enlisted men scuba divers. We'd get a b
ushel of Longusta  (clawless lobster) and red snapper and other popular eat
ing fish as we could find, to feed the dignitaries plus get a day off of wo
rk.  

I also played guitar back in those days and got a little rock and roll band
 together. It was encouraged by the Captain for the "moral of the troops" B
ut we were occasionally "conscripted" to play in the officers club when vis
itors came. We would also play in the local town tavern for the men and the
ir families who lived off base. No money involved. We'd do it just for the  
fun of it. OH and there was also a big corporate RCA and Other Government C
ontractors base on another part of the island. After a very successful rock
et launch from Cape Canaveral (now Cape Kennedy) they had a big celebration
. Brought in a 28 piece band from the Fort Montigue hotel in Nassau. Since  
there were only men on the bases they shipped in a couple of hundred girls  
from Nassau and surrounding islands for the celebration. Since the big band
 was going to take an hour break half way though the night they asked us (m
y little R&R band) if we wanted to play during the break. Well, up till tha
t point the big band was playing all the Benny Goodman and Tommy Dorsey typ
e music and the (about) 1000 people were hardly mixing or dancing at all. M
y band consisted of Saxophone player who also sang, drums, base and guitar  
and Rock and Roll was at a peak of popularity with the younger crowd. We go
t up and the first song we played was Rock around the Clock. The place went
 crazy. We only had about 15 songs at the time. We played 3 sets of the sam
e songs and they still didn't want us to get off the stage. The leader of t
he big band was a little pissed to say the least. That's something I'll nev
er, ever forget.  

I think the biggest event was that we were involved with was the splashdown
 of one of the first US unmanned satellites. I forget which one now but we  
were able to pick up the landing with the hydrophones and direct the ships  
to it's location.  

Lot's of other adventures too like ?.Getting MAPS flight to Patrick
 Air Force base and trips to Miami Beach, Getting drunk,  Boat trips to Nas
sau, getting drunk, meeting very friendly native girls, getting drunk,  exp
loring caves, getting drunk, falling off a cliff and braking my leg, gettin
g drunk,  water skiing, getting drunk,  getting  ??.. well  
you get the idea.  

I have to say though  that probably that experience is what has made me alm
ost a complete tea toatler today.  

All I can say at this point in my life is that it's a good thing that 17 ye
ar old's are invulnerable

Re: Heard From An Old ASAer Today
On 10/22/2018 3:35 PM, Jim Davis wrote:
> On Saturday
, October 20, 2018 at 8:45:55 AM UTC-4, ABLE1 wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it
>>
>> Jim,
>>
>> That is very impressive and c
ongrats to you for the experiences and
>> adventures
you have enjoyed.  I too am former US Navy in the mid
60's,
>> half way around the globe, Shellback and oth

er experiences, and I had
>> similar thoughts quite s
ome time ago about renting a sailboat as you
>> have
done.  Ahhhh the ADVENTURES I would have had..........
....
>>
>> When I brought the "thought" up to my wif

e, it all ended in a couple of
>> micro seconds......
.....................
>>
>> Thanks for typing what m

ight have been my experiences as well.
>> I might sha
re with my wife.................... or not............
....
>>
>> Have a good weekend.
>>
>> Les
>  
> W

ould you believe that I never was stationed on a ship?

>  
> This was back in the 50's. I was in communicat

ions and when I got out of training school at Bainbrid
ge, myself and 4 other buddies I'd hooked up with and
became friends with in boot training all coincidently
got billeted to go to cryptography school in Norfolk V
a. We passed top secret clearance and then surprisingl
y we were put in for Atomic top secret clearance. We d
idn't have a clue where they were going to send us. We
 wound up on an Island in the Bahamas where there was
a submarine tracking station set up using hydrophones
laid off the continental shelf of the island. Sonar me
n could pick up and translate ships propeller signatur
es off the coast of Portugal and Africa. The premise w
as ?. with visual sightings and commercial shipping
schedules, which ships and their whereabouts in that a
rea could be known and assigned prop signatures. Anyth
ing that didn't coincide with known intel was consider
ed a Soviet Atomic submarine and tracked and eventuall
y identified. Both the east and west coast of the US h
ad total coverage with bases from Nova Scotia to Grand
 Turks Island on the east coast. It's all been disband
ed now and I just can't imagine what they have impleme
nted now days. We were all armed and had regular arms
practice. Was pretty serious business for a 17 year ol
d kid.
>  
> On the UP side however. I was stationed
on a tropical paradise. Took up scuba diving before Ja
cques Cousteau was a known celebrity. Spearfishing was
 allowed anywhere. I've speared 7foot sting ray, numer
ous shark, barracuda about 6 foot long. Our watch sche
dule was just super. We had 5 day watches, 24 hours of
f, 5 eve watches, 24 hours off and 5 mid watches. Then
 7 days off. We'd either get a MAPS flight to Florida
or we would get the mechanic to lay up a jeep "waiting
 for repair parts" and sneak a jeep out of the motor p
ool and drive down the beach for a week. We'd load up
the jeep with a couple of "shitcans" of ice, beer and
food and all our diving gear. Live on the beach for a
week. There were old abandoned plantations where we co
uld pick pineapples, mangoes, bananas, and of course c
oconuts to supplement the food we brought and what we
could spear and we cooked eveything in wash pails and
campfires on the beach. It's amazing how you can get u
sed to the no-see-ums and the land crabs when you're s
leeping on the beach. Whenever the Captain of the base
 had visits from Command, he would "authorize" a "isla
nd area surveillance boat trip" in the base LST (small
 landing boat). The "crew" coincidently consisted of t
he best enlisted men scuba divers. We'd get a bushel o
f Longusta  (clawless lobster) and red snapper and oth
er popular eating fish as we could find, to feed the d
ignitaries plus get a day off of work.
>  
> I also p
layed guitar back in those days and got a little rock
and roll band together. It was encouraged by the Capta
in for the "moral of the troops" But we were occasiona
lly "conscripted" to play in the officers club when vi
sitors came. We would also play in the local town tave
rn for the men and their families who lived off base.
No money involved. We'd do it just for the fun of it.
OH and there was also a big corporate RCA and Other Go
vernment Contractors base on another part of the islan
d. After a very successful rocket launch from Cape Can
averal (now Cape Kennedy) they had a big celebration.
Brought in a 28 piece band from the Fort Montigue hote
l in Nassau. Since there were only men on the bases th
ey shipped in a couple of hundred girls from Nassau an
d surrounding islands for the celebration. Since the b
ig band was going to take an hour break half way thoug
h the night they asked us (my little R&R band) if we w
anted to play during the break. Well, up till that poi
nt the big band was playing all the Benny Goodman and
Tommy Dorsey type music and the (about) 1000 people we
re hardly mixing or dancing at all. My band consisted
of Saxophone player who also sang, drums, base and gui
tar and Rock and Roll was at a peak of popularity with
 the younger crowd. We got up and the first song we pl
ayed was Rock around the Clock. The place went crazy.
We only had about 15 songs at the time. We played 3 se
ts of the same songs and they still didn't want us to
get off the stage. The leader of the big band was a li
ttle pissed to say the least. That's something I'll ne
ver, ever forget.
>  
> I think the biggest event was
 that we were involved with was the splashdown of one
of the first US unmanned satellites. I forget which on
e now but we were able to pick up the landing with the
 hydrophones and direct the ships to it's location.
>
  
> Lot's of other adventures too like ?.Getting MA
PS flight to Patrick Air Force base and trips to Miami
 Beach, Getting drunk,  Boat trips to Nassau, getting
drunk, meeting very friendly native girls, getting dru
nk,  exploring caves, getting drunk, falling off a cli
ff and braking my leg, getting drunk,  water skiing, g
etting drunk,  getting  ??.. well you get the idea
.
>  
> I have to say though  that probably that expe

rience is what has made me almost a complete tea toatl
er today.
>  
> All I can say at this point in my lif
e is that it's a good thing that 17 year old's are inv
ulnerable
>  
 
Jim,
Not even going to try an top th

at.  Not possible.
My USN adventure was to be station
ed on the 1st Fleet Flag ship out of
San Diego.  The
deployed to the Yokosuka, Japan and took over the Flag
 
Ship for the 7th Fleet.  USS Providence CLG-6 with a
 compliment of 1000
guys along with Marine Detachment
 for security.  Where ever the Admiral
wanted to go,
we went.  We went to ports in the Pacific that hadn't
seen
a US ship since WWII. We were off the coast of N
am doing shore
bombardment............... a lot.  Onc
e North of the DMZ we got into the
cross hairs of a g
un that rolled out on the beach.  Got hit by one shell
 
that took out our surface radar scanner.  One month
we were on line
lobbing shells until 4am on the 1st o
f the month so that the whole crew
could get Hazardou
s Duty Pay for the month, because were were not
sched
uled back until the following month.  A grand total of
 $60 extra
for the months pay.  Crossed the equator i
n the South Pacific after a
visit to Singapore and Ka
wala Lumpor, Malaysa.  Took a weeks leave with
anothe
r guy and went to Tokyo.  Got lucky and took a tour of
 the
Emperor's Palace.
 
About 2 years ago I request
ed my Military Records.  I read my medical
records an
d Evaluation Reports.  Especially one that was dated M
ay 1967.
In it my Lieutenant that said that I had no
initiative and lack of
interest, etc., etc.  Really a
 put down.  I thought WTF??  Then I looked
at the DAT
E, I was discharged 3 weeks later from Japan and went
home.
 
Well Duhhh!!!  He thought I should have taken
 the $2000 bonus and
shipped over for another 6 years
............ well NOOOOOOO!!!
 
Returned to Treasure
Island, CA where I was discharged.  I was given a
che
ck for $330 to buy a one-way plane ticket to Philadelp
hia.  I turned
it into Travelers Checks and used my t
humb to get hope to Pennsylvania.
It took me 3 days a
nd $20.75.  Biggest mistake of my life.  I got some
r
eally good long rides.  I should have turned around an
d made a left or
a right turn along the way and made
the trip last 30 days or so.
 
I have been kicking my
self ever since.  Even so it was quite the
adventure.
  I would do it again if I was a lot younger........

Missed opportunities always hurt.
 
So that's my cond
ensed story, and I am sticking to IT.
 
Have a good w
eek.
 
Les
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Re: Heard From An Old ASAer Today
On Monday, October 22, 2018 at 10:24:57 PM UTC-4, ABLE1 wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Even though I was on a three year holiday in paradise I always thought that
 I would have liked to do what you did. I'm thinking that if I had been sta
tioned on a ship I just might have shipped over again.  

Reading your adventure I remembered another stroke of luck I had. I slid th
ough my enlistment right between Laos and Viet Nam. There were no conflicts
 going on while I was in.  When my enlistment was up I checked in with the  
Executive Officer to see if I could ship over and stay on the island. With  
our specialized training we were entitled to stay in the Sub Sonar detectio
n system but he said he could only guarantee 18 months. Knowing the Navy, I
 figured that some Yeoman up in COMSERVLANT would see where I was for the l
ast 3 years and send me up to Nova Scotia for the rest of my tour. So, I op
ted out.  

On the way home on the plane I met a sweet young thing that was heading for
 Newark New Jersey. She was a recruiter for a brand new TV station that was
 just starting up and they needed people trained in communication electroni
cs. I made a date to go and meet up with her and also apply for a job but s
omehow, I never did. ( I guess it was more about the girl then the Job :-))
  

The kicker is ?. as it turned out, the TV station was WNET channel  
13 that was just starting up as a public broadcasting station and which eve
ntually became PBS. Who knows, I cuda been a contender !!! (to Quote Marlon
 Brando). or even a xekuative.


Re: Heard From An Old ASAer Today
On 10/23/2018 12:15 AM, Jim Davis wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Well it seems that "we" have snagged Bob's post a bit.  Sorry Bob!!

Shoulda Woulda Coulda as it's said "Hindsight is always 20/20".

If I woulda shipped over I woulda stayed on board and finished the
cruise.  And I coulda have been on the trip home adn I would have  
enjoyed New Zealand, Perth, Sydney, Tahiti, Tasmania,and Guam as well as  
some others.  For those geo-challenged that would be cruise around  
Australia just to get home to San Diego, CA USA.  I missed all of that.  
It might have be different if I could have shipped over till the end of  
the cruise.  I would have made 2nd Class PO or maybe even 1st Class. And
I might not have received a bad review by my Lieutenant.  LOL
I will never know.......................

Anyhow, all past memories.   Thanks for bringing them back.

Les









Re: Heard From An Old ASAer Today
On Tuesday, October 23, 2018 at 10:56:45 PM UTC-4, ABLE1 wrote:

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Same here. I passed the test for 2nd Class PO but didn't stay in long enoug
h to actually get the stripe.  

A Couple of weeks ago, I was cleaning out some drawers and came across my b
oot camp company picture. Lots of the guys wrote things on the back. I was  
surprised how many of them I remembered. I got a kick out of a lot of them  
calling me "Elvis". I was pretty popular with both the northerners and sout
herners. Even though I was from NY and liked to play R&R, I had learned to  
play from someone who liked and played country western so I knew a lot of c
ountry songs too. That was the age of Doo Wop so we did a lot of singing in
 the head to get the reverb. Boy what memories. Believe it or not, I still  
had my packed sea bag up in my parents attic until a couple of years ago. 1
3 button tailor mades and all. Of course the 32 inch waist line sort of pre
vented any hope of ever wearing them again. I've got a stenciled white hat  
someone around too. I donate to the Navy Memorial down in DC every now and  
then too. Bought a bronze copy of the Lone Sailor statue which sits on my s
helf. One of these days I'll get down to DC and see the real thing. They sa
y the memorial records is a good place to see if you can get in touch with  
some of your shipmates.

Re: Heard From An Old ASAer Today
On 10/24/2018 8:57 AM, Jim Davis wrote:
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Ah, heck.  No worries on my part.  This thread is pretty much off topic  
chat anyway.


Re: Heard From An Old ASAer Today
On 10/24/2018 3:56 PM, Bob La Londe wrote:
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Off Topic....................... Really?? I hadn't noticed.
Bob it 2018 USENET.......... Nothing is Off Topic anymore.  LOL  :-)


Re: Heard From An Old ASAer Today
On 10/24/2018 5:43 PM, ABLE1 wrote:
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LOL



ROFL

*Rocky T. Squirrel, esq.*


Re: Heard From An Old ASAer Today

On 10/24/2018 3:56 PM, Bob La Londe wrote:
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Off Topic....................... Really?? I hadn't noticed.
Bob it 2018 USENET.......... Nothing is Off Topic anymore.  LOL  :-)

*************************

You've been hanging out in RCM a little bit to much I think.  Gotta love me  
that 'K' key.



Re: Heard From An Old ASAer Today




On 10/24/2018 3:56 PM, Bob La Londe wrote:
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Off Topic....................... Really?? I hadn't noticed.
Bob it 2018 USENET.......... Nothing is Off Topic anymore.  LOL  :-)

*************************

You've been hanging out in RCM a little bit to much I think.  Gotta love me
that 'K' key.


*************************

P.S.  Saw your pinhole post.  Don't have much else to add.  My experience  
with such is the same as others.  Once it starts to go its pretty much done.  


Re: Heard From An Old ASAer Today
On 10/26/2018 11:59 AM, Bob La Londe wrote:
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Thanks!!
Yes, but my friend (customer) has too much money and far too much time  
and likes to tinker in order to save money.  LOL.

To which I had to explain to him about a "Tinkers Dam" and how
it might be used to fix his hole.  Which now has created a
whole other Off Topic thingie.........................

I was think about suggesting to him to try a sheet metal screw
with an amount of PC-7 Epoxy.  Can't be any worse than other
suggested fixes.

Later,

Les





Re: Heard From An Old ASAer Today

On 10/26/2018 11:59 AM, Bob La Londe wrote:
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Thanks!!
Yes, but my friend (customer) has too much money and far too much time
and likes to tinker in order to save money.  LOL.

To which I had to explain to him about a "Tinkers Dam" and how
it might be used to fix his hole.  Which now has created a
whole other Off Topic thingie.........................

I was think about suggesting to him to try a sheet metal screw
with an amount of PC-7 Epoxy.  Can't be any worse than other
suggested fixes.

***************************

Most epoxies soften and degraded to much with heat.  Maybe the water will  
keep it within its safe zone, but a teflon gasket inside the pot under the  
screw head might do the trick.  There it will be surrounded by water and  
should never get above its degradation temperature.  I have some 1/4" teflon  
rod if you want a small piece to play with.  I use it as hot casting cores  
when stainless creates bad castings by wicking away heat to fast.



Re: Heard From An Old ASAer Today
On 10/26/2018 1:05 PM, Bob La Londe wrote:

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Bob,

I had used PC-7 years ago to repair a 5hp Briggs engine that the
connecting rod broke and in turn cracked the case.  After disassembly
I replaced the rod, etc. and then on the inside of the case I used
PC-7 to repair the crack in the case.  Held up quite well for a couple
of years for a leaf catcher until I got a different mower.  The  
blower/engine is still in my shop, ready to go..........someday.

Thanks for the teflon offer.  But I think I can source some locally.
I am thinking that a short #8 or #10 stainless Sheet Metal screw with
a teflon 1/8" washer would do the trick on the pot.  Just round off
the point with a grinder and done.

Les




Re: Heard From An Old ASAer Today
On 10/26/2018 12:49 PM, ABLE1 wrote:
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Cool, if you change your mind just email me your address.  I can drill  
and slice a few washers off if you like. I have one of my small lathes  
setup with a 3C collet chuck just for working softer materials like  
teflon rod.  I might have some 5/16 too.  I'd have to go look.

Well, actually I mostly use it for rounding the ends of stainless dowel  
pins, but I originally set it up for working with softer materials like  
teflon rod.

Re: Heard From An Old ASAer Today
On 10/24/2018 11:57 AM, Jim Davis wrote:
> On Tuesday
, October 23, 2018 at 10:56:45 PM UTC-4, ABLE1 wrote:

>  
>>
>> Well it seems that "we" have snagged Bob's

 post a bit.  Sorry Bob!!
>>
>> Shoulda Woulda Could
a as it's said "Hindsight is always 20/20".
>>
>> If
 I woulda shipped over I woulda stayed on board and fi
nished the
>> cruise.  And I coulda have been on the
trip home adn I would have
>> enjoyed New Zealand, Pe
rth, Sydney, Tahiti, Tasmania,and Guam as well as
>>
some others.  For those geo-challenged that would be c
ruise around
>> Australia just to get home to San Die
go, CA USA.  I missed all of that.
>> It might have b
e different if I could have shipped over till the end
of
>> the cruise.  I would have made 2nd Class PO or

maybe even 1st Class. And
>> I might not have receive
d a bad review by my Lieutenant.  LOL
>> I will never
 know.......................
>>
>> Anyhow, all past
memories.   Thanks for bringing them back.
>>
>> Les

>  
> Same here. I passed the test for 2nd Class PO

but didn't stay in long enough to actually get the str
ipe.
>  
> A Couple of weeks ago, I was cleaning out

some drawers and came across my boot camp company pict
ure. Lots of the guys wrote things on the back. I was
surprised how many of them I remembered. I got a kick
out of a lot of them calling me "Elvis". I was pretty
popular with both the northerners and southerners. Eve
n though I was from NY and liked to play R&R, I had le
arned to play from someone who liked and played countr
y western so I knew a lot of country songs too. That w
as the age of Doo Wop so we did a lot of singing in th
e head to get the reverb. Boy what memories. Believe i
t or not, I still had my packed sea bag up in my paren
ts attic until a couple of years ago. 13 button tailor
 mades and all. Of course the 32 inch waist line sort
of prevented any hope of ever wearing them again. I've
 got a stenciled white hat someone around too. I donat
e to the Navy Memorial down in DC every now and then t
oo. Bought a bronze copy of the Lone Sailor statue whi
ch sits on my shelf. One of these days I'll get down t
o DC and see the real thing. They say the memorial rec
ords is a good place to see if you can get in touch wi
th some of your shipmates.
 
Yes, Lots of memories. I
 was DC Damage Control, Firefighter, Wood Shop,  
R-Di
vision (Repair).  While in the Wood Shop I got constan
t request for
Cruise Boxes for Officers leaving the s
hip for other duties.  Cruise  
Boxes were a 1/2" plyw
ood boxes about 32"L x 18"W x 18"H, Piano Hinge  
top
with Handles on the end and Hasp & Hinge for locking.
 I would flame
burn the surfaces to make the grain po
p and the shellac the whole thing.
It was primarily f
or Officers, except the "special" one that I had  
shi
pped home to Pennsylvania from Japan.
 
I also, made
plaques with various plaster and bronze plates of the
ships  
seal and Etched labels that were given to vari
ous visiting dignitaries  
and guest.  The plaster cas
t of the ships seal had to be hand painted.
I also ca
me up with my own plaque design that got approved by t
he  
Captain for production.
 
Then I became the Supp
ly Petty Officer for the Division since the  
previous
 guy got discharged.  His books were terrible.  Was an
 absolute
challenge trying to keep thing right.  Thin
gs showed up with no
paper trail.  It was very frustr
ating trying to figure it all out.
Then one morning I
 went to my office and the books were gone.  I looked

everywhere.  I was pissed.  Finally had to go and mak
e a report to the  
Lieutenant.  I explained that all
the books were gone, and I looked ever  
where.  He sa
id, "Well you will have to start over, go Supply Dept.
 and  
requisition a new set."  That is when it hit me
!!  I could start FRESH!!  
  Clean Slate!!  Lay out t
he books my way, like they should be... COOL!!!
I was
 very HAPPY!!  And it showed with the smile on my face
 :-)
 
About two weeks later I woke up in the more an
d got dressed.  When I put
my shoes on some thing did
 not feel right.  I pulled my foot out and  
somebody
"literally" had S**T in my shoes.  Aghhhhhhhh!!!!  Str
ipped
down and took another shower.  Put on my Dress
"Spit Shined" Shoes.  The
old shoes will sleep with t
he fishes in the South China Sea.  Went to my
office
and requisitioned a new pair of shoes.  Had no clue wh
o had done
this.
 
About a month later I found out.
 Another guy in the Division was  
discharged and went
 home.  That is when the other guys told me what was  

going on.  Apparently, this guy did not like me for s
ome reason and
wanted to make my days a pure hell.  S
o he threw my books over the side
one night while he
was on the 12-4 watch.  When he realized that the
pla
n backfired when I became very happy by ordered new bo
oks he had to
some something different.  That is when
 on the next 12-4 watch while I  
was sleep in my rack
 he took my shoes and...................
 
Ahhhhhhhhh
 The US Navy........... Yes, I have lots of memories.

 
Les
 
 
 
 
 
 


Re: Heard From An Old ASAer Today
On Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at 6:43:22 PM UTC-4, ABLE1 wrote:
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That story reminded me of another.

As you can tell from my other story, there was a lot of drinking going on o
n that island I was stationed. Main reason was, you could get a quart of vo
dka from the ships store for $3.50.  

Anyway, people were always doing bizarre things. We slept in cubicles with  
four bunks. One night I wake up with yelling going on in the cubicle. There
's a sailor standing over a bunk taking a leak on the guy in the bunk. The  
guy in the bunk wakes up yelling "Hey What the hell are you doing?" The guy
 taking a leak says "OH I'm shrorry. I tho eyoo were shomone else" and stag
gers out of the cubicle.  

We never figured out who he thought he was pissing on.

Re: Heard From An Old ASAer Today

On 10/18/2018 9:29 PM, Jim Davis wrote:
 > On Tuesday, October 16, 2018 at 7:23:05 PM UTC-4, Bob La Londe wrote:
 >> I told him he should stop in here and say hi.  He says he's retired now.
 >>
 >> I may stop by and see him in the mid later winter.  Looking at doing a
 >> Caribbean cruise with my wife for our 25th.  Probably launch out a port
 >> in his home state rather than freeze our tushies off sailing down the
 >> eastern seaboard.
 >
 > I've traveled the Caribbean for many many years. Starting back in the  
60's right up through the 2000's. We bare boat chartered at least 25/30  
times. ( for the non-sailors out there that means we rented a big sail  
boat and sailed it ourselves without a captain) Most of our sailing was  
done in the British Virgin Islands but we also sailed from St Vincent to  
Granada and back on a 10 day excursion, stopping at dozens of islands on  
the way. We sailed St Martin and surrounding waters. US Virgin Islands,  
Honduras Bay Islands and many other places to numerous to remember now.  
Now days we just fly to an Island and rent a car. We always make it a  
point to go on a sail with a private captain as a reminisce of our  
sailing days. Our sailing days are over now. I don't have the speed,  
agility or stamina any longer and my navigation skills are slowly  
slipping from memory. It sure was a great run though. Memories and  
stories up the yazoo. I also was stationed on an Island in the Bahamas  
when I was in the US Navy back in the 50's and did a tremendous amount  
of scuba diving, so that always was a side adventure on all of our  
sailing trips. I was on the Navy spearfishing diving team competing on  
Grand Bahama. Diving in the Bay Island off of Honduras and in the  
Caymans is just indescribable.
 >
 > People keep telling me that ship cruses are fun but needless to say,  
after sailing a 60 foot yawl with 4 to 6 sailors for all those years, I  
think that ship cruising is for landlubbers and I just can't bring  
myself to go on a boat trip with 5000 of my closest friends. I just have  
this feeling that there is at least one out of those 5000 people that  
would get in my face and either he or I would go overboard.
 >
 > Don't mean to belittle your trip Bob ?? just story telling.
 >
 > The best Islands as far a people go are Grand Cayman and Barbados.  
The people are just great. They know that tourism is their source of  
income and treat it accordingly with respect. They are helpful, pleasant  
and want you to enjoy their beautiful islands. St Thomas has turned into  
strictly a tourist trap. We used to stop in Charlotte Amali to pick up  
water and supplies. A couple of times we went down to where the cruse  
ships come in and it was almost a mob scene when the tourists cam off  
the boat. All the natives trying to sell their overprice cheap crap  
souvenirs. And that was 20 years ago. Can't imagine what it's like now.  
I understand that the Rastafarians have just about taken over the whole  
Island. I had some friends go there to rent a villa and one night they  
witnessed a gun fight with cars racing around the town. Not just hand  
guns but machine guns. St Martin is pretty good. The Dutch side is where  
all the shops are but the French side has the great restaurants. St  
Johns in the British Virgin Islands is pretty good too but I don't think  
cruise ships stop there. As a matter of fact all the islands in the BVI  
are pretty good. Went to Puerto Rico once and would never go back again.  
St Croix is good too but kind of small and out of the way for cruise  
ships. St Vincent has a volcano on it and not too much else. The Yucatan  
Peninsula has some good places. Cozumel was OK but it's a popular place  
for the college kids. Oh Yeah, make sure you don't time your trip during  
college break. First of all the prices skyrocket and the kids will get  
on your nerves pretty quick. As much as it's advertised, Aruba and  
Curacao have got no sights to see. Barren Island with hardly any  
tropical looking areas. Mostly bare coral and cactus and lots of goats,  
gambling, shopping, restaurants and condos
 >
 > That's about all I can think of right now. If you have an specific  
questions let me know.
 >


I was to the Bahamas when I was about 3 years old.  I've got some  
interesting memories.

Bumming around the docks with my mom talking to fishermen.

Looking off the Queen's tower and wanting to play with all the toy cars  
and toy houses in the neighborhood below.

Playing on a log with another kid pretending it was our ship and getting  
3 stitches in my forehead when he wanted me to get off his ship and he  
busted me in the head with a rock.

Scalded my arm with hot coffee.

Overall it was an adventure.  Oh, and we weren't "tourists" persay.  We  
were there with the carnival working.

I'd like to look off the Queen's tower again with an adult perspective.  
Most of the rest of that adventure I see no need to duplicate.  LOL.



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