Help my Linksys WRT54G router was broken into using the "curl" command - Page 3

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Re: Help my Linksys WRT54G router was broken into using the "curl" command

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Baloney.  All 802.11 wireless is done on by bridging on Layer 2 with
MAC addresses.  There is nothing in the 802.11 protocol or specs that
even mentions IP addresses.  Not all wireless packets are encrypted.
However, all packets that contain an IP address in the header,
including ARP broadcasts and responses, are encrypted.  He could sniff
all he wants and without the encryption key, he's not going to see an
IP address go by.

I wasn't 100.0% sure of this so I ran some old capture log files
through Ethereal looking for telltale ARP broadcasts
(frame.pkt_len==68 and wlan.da==ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff)
and their corresponding responses.  No IP's visible.  I'll run some
more tests later as I'm still not 100.0% sure that all IP's are
suitably encapsulated in encrypted packets.

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He can do network discovery successfully from the wired ethernet part
of the network, because the packets are not encrypted.  That would
require he plug his laptop into your router and run whatever
application he finds useful.  However, if he were to attempt that via
wireless, on an encrypted WLAN to which he does NOT have the key, it
won't work.  He would see the MAC addresses of most of the devices,
but not the IP addresses.

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Sigh.  GENERIC-MAP-NOMATCH means that the vulnerability does not match
anything in the Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures database.  In
other words, it's either something new, weird, or ridiculous.  It's
not a specific vulnerability or problem.
<http://cve.mitre.org/cgi-bin/cvename.cgi?name=generic-map-nomatch

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Yeah, they do reproduce themselves.  Kinda like recycled year old
vulnerabilities rise from the near dead.

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Ask him to post somewhere, a capture log and WireShark decode of an
wirleess encrypted session that shows exposed IP addresses.  I'm too
lazy to do the work on a holiday.


--
Jeff Liebermann     jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann     AE6KS    831-336-2558

Re: Help my Linksys WRT54G router was broken into using the "curl" command
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Among the reasons having wireless security disabled and letting
neighbors join your local network for free is a bad idea.

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http://www.securityfocus.com/archive/1/452020


or... use third party firmware such as

http://www.dd-wrt.com /
http://openwrt.org /

--
Todd H.
http://www.toddh.net /

Re: Help my Linksys WRT54G router was broken into using the "curl" command
comphelp@toddh.net (Todd H.) writes:

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I meant to paste this vulnerability of v5 wrt54g's  here:

Linksys WRT54GS POST Request Configuration Change Authentication
Bypass Vulnerability
http://www.securityfocus.com/bid/19347/references

It's a known issue.  The fix is to upgrade firmware per the link
below.

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And I'd have a chat with the parents of the kid, thanking him for
bringing the issue to your attention, but alwso warning him that his
"gray hat" actitivities can get him sent to jail, despite being well
meaning.  

You don't "test" stuff you don't own or are engaged to test with
written legal permission of the owner.  


Some news stories to drive the point home:

http://news.com.com/2009-1001-958129.html
http://news.zdnet.com/2100-1009_22-958920.html


Best Regards,
--
Todd H.
http://www.toddh.net /

Re: Help my Linksys WRT54G router was broken into using the "curl" command
On 04 Jul 2007 09:36:41 -0500, Todd H. wrote:
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Here is a forwarded email which explains the severe Linksys WRT54G
vulnerability I'm afraid. It looks like this vulnerability which allows any
web site to disable your browser security has been around for a long time
based on the time stamps of the email!

Debbie

Date:  Fri, 04 Aug 2006 14:00:01 +0000
Subject:  [Full-disclosure] linksys WRT54g authentication bypass
 
I'm having some trouble believing this hasn't been reported before.  If you
have a linksys router handy, please check to see whether it is vulnerable
to this attack.  It's possible that all of the linksys router web UIs have
the same bug.  Hopefully the problem is isolated to one particular model or
firmware revision.

I. DESCRIPTION

Tested product: Linksys WRT54g home router, firmware revision 1.00.9.

Problem #1: No password validation for configuration settings.

The WRT54g does not attempt to verify a username and password when
configuration settings are being changed.  If you wish to read
configuration settings, you must provide the administrator ID and password
via HTTP basic authentication.  No similar check is done for configuration
changes.

This request results in a user-id and password prompt:
GET /wireless.htm

This request disables wireless security on the router, with no password
prompt:
POST /Security.tri
Content-Length: 24

SecurityMode=0&layout=en

Problem #2: Cross-site request forgery

The web administration console does not verify that the request to change
the router configuration is being made with the consent of the
administrator.  Any web site can force a browser to send a request to the
linksys router, and the router will accept the request.


II. Exploitation

The combination of these two bugs means that any internet web site can
change the configuration of your router.  Recently published techniques for
port-scanning and web server finger printing via java and javascript make
this even easier.  The attack scenario is as follows:

- intranet user visits a malicious web site
- malicious web site returns specially crafted HTML page
- intranet user's browser automatically sends a request to the router that
enables the remote administration interface
- the owner of the malicious web site now has complete access to your
router

I'm not going to share the "specially crafted HTML page" at this time, but
it isn't all that special.


III. DETECTION

If your router is vulnerable, the following curl command will disable
wireless security on your router.  Tests for other router models and
firmware revisions may be different:

curl -d "SecurityMode=0&layout=en" http://192.168.0.1/Security.tri


IV. MITIGATION

1) Make sure you've disabled the remote administration feature of your
router.  If you have this "feature" enabled, anybody on the internet can
take control of the router.

2) Change the IP address of the router to a random value, preferably in the
range assigned to private networks.  For example, change the IP address to
10.x.y.z, where x, y, and z are numbers between 0 and 255 inclusive.  This
makes it more difficult for an attacker to forge the request necessary to
change the router configuration.  This mitigation technique might not help
much if you have a java-enabled browser, because of recently published
techniques for determining gateway addresses via java applets.

3) Disable HTTP access to the administration interface of the router,
allowing only HTTPS access.  Under most circumstances, this will cause the
browser to show a certificate warning before the configuration is changed.

V. VENDOR NOTIFICATION

Linksys customer support was notified on June 24, 2006.
Full disclosure on August 4, 2006

Re: Help my Linksys WRT54G router was broken into using the "curl" command
On 04 Jul 2007 09:32:11 -0500, Todd H. wrote:
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But, he showed me it works while WIRED to my vulnerable Linksys WRT54G
router! He said the GENERIC-MAP-NOMATCH vulnerability has nothing to do
with wireless. It's inherent in the Linksys WRT54G router unfortunately!

Here is his email talking about TWO vulnerabilities in the Linksys WRT54G
router!

"You have two problems. The first is the password validation for
configuration settings is not needed for your Linksys WRT54G router and the
second is that with java turned on any web site anywhere can force a
request to the linksys router, and the router will accept the request."

He also sent me a 2600 web address explaining the whole thing but I didn't
understand it at all.

Re: Help my Linksys WRT54G router was broken into using the "curl" command

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This is among the reasons you only let trusted parties on your LAN if
at all possible.

IIRC, it requires LAN access to exploit unless you are running a
non-default configuration whereby remote admin is enabled.

It pertains to wireless insofar as if you don't have wireless security
enabled, then any old neighbor can join to your LAN and then exercise
the vulnerability.

--
Todd H.
http://www.toddh.net /

Re: Help my Linksys WRT54G router was broken into using the "curl" command

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Old bugs never die.  They just get reposted:
<http://seclists.org/bugtraq/2006/Aug/0218.html
<http://securitytracker.com/alerts/2006/Aug/1016638.html
<http://www.securityfocus.com/bid/19347/exploit
<http://archive.cert.uni-stuttgart.de/bugtraq/2006/08/msg00129.html
etc...
Note the dates from about a year ago.  This was fixed with a firmware
update to the v5/v6 hardware mutation router with v1.01.0.  The
current version is v1.02.0.  Please download, install, and retest.

All the routers I have handy are running DD-WRT v23 SP2 and SP3.  The
curl trick doesn't work on any of them from either Ubuntu 6.10 or
Cygwin 1.5.xx on W2K.

You must really be concerned as you also posted the comment to the
Linksys Forums at:
<http://forums.linksys.com/linksys/board/message?board.id=Wireless_Routers&thread.id=49502

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Nice kid.  Be sure to thank him.  If you're in the computah biz, hire
him.

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If he's doing it from the LAN side, that's cheating a bit.  In order
to do the same thing from the WAN side, your router would need to have
remote admin enabled, which is disabled by default.  Note the default
settings:
<http://www.linksysdata.com/ui/WRT54G/v5/1.00.6/Manage.htm
This is v1.00.6.

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If remote admin was enabled, someone has been tinkering with the
default setup.  

Incidentally, all the router manufacturers, except 2Wire ship their
routers not very secure by default.  If you simply plugged the router
in straight out of the box, you have a wide open system, with well
know passwords, and an invitation for problems.  I've been trying to
get various manufacturers to change their evil ways and start shipping
routers that require the user to setup:
1.  A suitable router password
2.  A unique SSID
3.  A reasonable WPA-PSK encryption key
The wireless would be disabled until this is done.  None of them want
to do this for fear that it would diminish your "out of box
experience".

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I've been tempted quite often as there are plenty of other things I
detest about the WRT54G/GS v5 and v6 mutations.  The general lack of
RAM and NVRAM are my biggest gripe, which make loading alternative
firmware a PITA.  v5 and v6 routers also tend to lockup and hang for
no obvious reason.  The inability to simultaneously connect more than
a few clients:
http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/component/option,com_chart/Itemid,189/chart,124 /
(see bottom of chart) in v5 and v6 also sucks.  Yeah, it's a terrible
router.  If you're planning on recycling yours, please mail it to the
address in my .signature.

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The kid didn't tell you this?  First he breaks in.  He leaves remote
admin turned on so he can break in again.  Then he shows you how it
works, but doesn't tell you how to fix it?  Is he selling wireless
routers door to door?  Smart kid.

Perhaps you should try the Linksys support web pile:
<http://www.linksys.com/servlet/Satellite?c=L_CASupport_C2&childpagename=US%2FLayout&cid=1166859837401&packedargs=sku%3DWRT54G&pagename=Linksys%2FCommon%2FVisitorWrapper&lid=3740137401B01&displaypage=download
Your WRT54G hardware mutation number is on the serial number tag on
the bottom of the router.


--
Jeff Liebermann     jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann     AE6KS    831-336-2558

Re: Help my Linksys WRT54G router was broken into using the "curl" command
On Wed, 04 Jul 2007 08:03:13 -0700, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

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You are giving advice to hire someone just because they could search the
web and find some outdated information?  How does this qualify them?  You
are kidding right?  You don't happen to be in the computer business
yourself are you?

<one of the most lamest reason I have ever heard for hiring someone>


--

Regards
Robert

Smile... it increases your face value!


----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
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Re: Help my Linksys WRT54G router was broken into using the "curl" command

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The kid knew how to find the information and use it. That's the key to using
Information Technology is does one know how to go find the information when
needed and apply it.

Most don't know how to do it.



 


Re: Help my Linksys WRT54G router was broken into using the "curl" command

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Good questions that deserve an answer.

I've done some hiring in the past with mixed results.  I tend to judge
applicants and employees by their "willingness and ability to learn"
and not what they currently know.  This is currently not a very
popular method.  I have a variety of (illegal) tricks to test for
these attributes.  I've found it amazingly difficult to find someone
that is actually able to learn something new.  Who needs to learn
anything when you can just look it up on the internet?  I even find
myself guilty of such intellectual laziness.

At age 15, this kid hasn't experienced the alleged benefits or the
stultifying and regressive practices of the US secondary and college
educational system.  He seems to have initiative, which is a sure sign
that he is still able to think for himself.  He may be a script
kiddie, but he has the guts to show off what he knows, which suggests
he has pride in what he knows.  He mows lawns, which implies that he
knows what money is worth and how it's obtained.  He's trying to be
helpful, which is a substantial improvement over those that just try
to be destructive.

At age 15, I would not expect him to be particularly useful as an
employee.  I haven't hired anyone quite that young, but I've had some
experience hiring the local high skool and college inmates.  Results
have been mixes, but in general, the smart ones do very well, while
the intellectually lazy eventually screw up and do badly.

I'm self employed and have been successfully playing computer
consultant since about 1982.  Prior to that, I designed communications
radios for various employers, owned a communications repair shop, and
owned a print shop.  A minor reason why I'm self employed is my
unwillingness to deal with employees (and partners).  I currently hire
contractors as needed, but not employees.

I suspect that the OP could hire the kid to fix her wireless security.
However, that's not what's needed.  I think he might be more useful in
cleaning up the system security, including the desktops and laptops,
as well as possibly teaching the OP how it all works.  He may be
recycling stuff from the internet, but that's how kids learn things
these days.  In effect, she would be hiring him as her personal
security advisor and update manager, something a 15 year old could
easily do for a single small system.

Incidentally, in the distant past, when the internet was mostly usenet
news, I ran a Cnews server and BBS in my office.  A common initiation
rite at the local high school was to break into my system.  Some of
the methods used were amazingly clever and ingenious.  I learned quite
a bit.  I would later pay some of the better hackers to help maintain
my systems.  All of them did well after graduation, although not
necessarily in computing.

It's possible that you fear that your job in firewall security might
be in danger from a 15 year old.  I've seen some rather impressive IOS
configuration work done by 18 year olds.  I've also seen some
disgusting security holes found by kids who simply don't know that
you're not suppose to do this or that.  My former neighbors 12 year
old was an amazing "finger hacker" who could read my keystrokes almost
as fast as I could type.  How many older IT people do you know that
can spot a hacked and wiretapped KVM switch?  Are your server room
keystrokes being recorded by the security camera?  Are your backup
tapes and drives encrypted and/or secure?  Done any dumpster diving
lately?  None of this is particularly appealing to the typical IT
employee, but is stock and trade to a 15 to 18 year old.  What we gain
in knowledge and experience, we lose in imagination and initiative.

In case you're wondering, I got my start in tech as a 16 year old
phone phreak, which was the accessible high tech of the 1960's. You'll
probably find my name in some Ma Bell horror stories.  I was later
lucky enough to find part time employment with companies and
individuals that needed imagination and smarts more than experience
and knowledge.



--
Jeff Liebermann     jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann     AE6KS    831-336-2558

Re: Help my Linksys WRT54G router was broken into using the "curl" command
Jeff Liebermann wrote:
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My IT 'kid" is just turned 20. I turn him loose to fix customer issues - if
he can't fix it, he knows how to find the answer. There has never been a
service call that he hasn't cleared.

Its not what you know...its all in how to recognize what the problem is,
how to fix it or find the answer...and learn from it. And document the
whole episode for future references.

And he's starting up his own trucking business on the side.


Re: Help my Linksys WRT54G router was broken into using the "curl" command
On Wed, 04 Jul 2007 08:03:13 -0700, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
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Hi Jeff!
Yes. I am really concerned. And scared that it takes all of ten seconds to
break into my router by a fifteen year old cute kid who mows my lawn every
month. I believ him when he says I need to upgrade my router. You are the
only one here who believed me. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. For a
moment, I thought I was going crazy when the "experts" were telling me what
I saw I didn't see. I felt like I was being persecuted for reporting this.
I didn't realize that the Linksys WRT54G router I bought was so weak. Why
didn't Linksys TELL me about this in the package? I have never updated my
"firmware" before. Can you hand hold my hands a bit to tell me how to do
it. I don't want to ruin the router.

I'll first read everything I can find on updating the router and then post
back if I ruin it doing so. I can read well but I don't know how to debug
once I hit a problem. But I keep trying and that's why I'm here taling to
you!

Thank you - I love your post the best because I was beginning to wonder why
nobody else knew about this which seemed pretty bad that it took all of ten
seconds to wipe out all my hardware security.

BTW, my neighbor said to change my IP address and the hostname and media
address of my router and pc constantly because that's what he used to
figure out which was mine in the neighborhood. Is there a way to change the
router & PC hostname and media name automatically every day or do I have to
do it manually every day to be safe?

Re: Help my Linksys WRT54G router was broken into using the "curl" command

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You don't need a new router.  You need a firmware update.  No big
deal.  What I'm concerned about his how remote access got turned on
and who did it (and why).  You might want to interrogate the kid.

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Yes, but don't presume it's my good intentions or generous attitude.
The problem is that old bugs tend to come back.  One version fixes a
problem, the next version brings it back as sloppy coders recycle old
code.  In the software biz, it's part of regression testing.  

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Chuckle.  Ever see any magic tricks or sleight of hand?  It looks
real, but you just know something is going on in the background. Well,
hacking and breaking in are like that.  I derived considerable
entertainment at the expense of a few IT people (who now hate my guts)
breaking into their systems using social engineering, and then making
it look like some kind of vulnerability or systemic problem.  Yeah, I
know I have a warped sense of humor, but it keeps me entertained.  The
only problem is that the IT people now hate my guts.  Oh well.

Anyway, be careful that what you're seeing is actually a breakin or
vulnerability in progress, and not the residue from a previous
breaking.  The fact that remote access was apparently enabled makes me
VERY suspicious.

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Well sure.  Blame the victim and all that.  Nobody wants to be told
their network is full of holes and vulnerable to attack.  Why bother
fixing the problem when you can simply discredit the person that found
the problem?

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It's old firmware.  Someone goofed and it's been fixed.  All vendors
have their security holes and problems.

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Actually, that's a good point because I couldn't find it in the
firmware release notes.  It's fashionable to disclose vulnerabilities
only after the fixes are available.  That's a fair method, but doesn't
work if users like yourself do not perform ritualistic firmware
version checks and updates.

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There are instructions on the Linksys web site (somewhere).  It's
basically very easy.  Download the firmware image file.  Make an extra
effort to be sure you have the correct version and file.  You still
haven't bothered to disclose your WRT54G hardware mutation, so I can't
offer specific advice, filenames, and URL's.

Uncompress the download if it's a ZIP file.  Go to the firmware update
page:
<http://www.linksysdata.com/ui/WRT54G/v5/1.00.6/Upgrade.htm
and browse merrily to the .bin (or whatever) file.  Hit update and
wait.  When you think it's done, wait some more.  Figure on about 2
minutes to be safe.  With v5/v6, I don't think you have to reset
anything.  That's it.

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Don't bother.  Almost all of that manner of improving security
consists of either obscuring your setup or introducing additional
obstacles.  Those are good if you enjoy complicating your own life as
well as that of the prospective hacker, but are generally near
worthless.  See the FAQ at:
<http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi#Wi-Fi_Security
Your real security is in:
  WPA-PSK or WPA2-PSK encryption
  Password for router access
  Firmware updates
Most of the tweaks are of marginal value.  

If you want real security, setup a VPN and a RADIUS server.  The
RADIUS server provides a login and password per user, but also
delivers a unique one time WPA encryption key which cannot be leaked.
If I wanted to attack your system, I would not attack the router, but
would try to extract the WPA key from your Windoze registry.  See:
<http://www.wirelessdefence.org/Contents/Aircrack-ng_WinWzcook.htm
A RADIUS server eliminates the use of a shared key, but preventing it
from being leaked.  Ummm... Don't tell the 15 year old brat.

As for your other questions....

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You can't do that with the stock Linksys firmware.  There's only one
user and that's admin.  Other routers allow additional users and even
user levels, such as read-only users.  If you really want this
feature, the alternative firmware (DD-WRT, OpenWRT) all have
additional users.  However, again, this is nothing but security by
obscurity and doesn't provide any real security.  Anyway, user names
are suppose to be publicly accessible and not hidden like a password.

Incidentally, one of my accomplices decided that I should test his
system security.  He did all the right things, but I still managed to
break in.  I tricked him into using his laptop to "test" the security
by claiming my laptop was dead.  He stupidly saves all his passwords
in his Firefox browser.  It was a simple matter to connect,
automatically login with the saved password, and collect my free
lunch.  This is again why I don't like shared keys, stored passwords,
and other convenience features.

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Lack of sufficient RAM and NVRAM in the router limits the features
that can be crammed inside.  Again, the login name is suppose to be
publicly known and accessible and should not be treated as yet another
password.  It also doesn't add much security as the same mechanisms
I've previously listed to bypass passwords will work with login names.

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1.  You didn't specify WRT54G hardware mutation after being asked by
multiple people for this information.
2.  You didn't search with Google to see if it was a known problem.
3.  Declared the WRT54G to be worthless BEFORE asking if there was a
fix.
4.  Trusted my advice.  Don't trust ANYONE about security without
first understanding what you're doing, why it's necessary, and
verifying that it's considered a reasonable thing to do.
5.  Posted far too many replies.  I'm lazy and don't like hopping from
message to message.

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That's been asked before, but with no definitive conclusion.  The
current guess is that a hostname is required for syslog to work.  It
can be anything, but not blank.

--
Jeff Liebermann     jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann     AE6KS    831-336-2558

Re: Help my Linksys WRT54G router was broken into using the "curl" command
On Wed, 04 Jul 2007 09:59:06 -0700, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

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This recommended reference says the Linksys WRT54G firmware update only
fixes half the problems in that something called "authentication bypass
vulnerability" was fixed but not something called "the CSRF vulnerability"
(http://www.securityfocus.com/archive/1/452020 ).

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Yes. It was enabled. I don't know how as I never touched that before. Web
access, whatever that is, was also enabled, as was pnp and a zillion other
things.

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I understand but I would have thought this would warrant a recall like they
do with cars where you bring it in and they bring it back up to safety
specifications. There's no way they should have sold that router to me with
such an unsafe vulnerability. Why do we recall cars but not routers that
have safety problems?

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Hmmm... that's not one of my options. I have WPA2 Personal on the Linksys
WRT54G router (which I looked up to be the same thing as WPA2 PSK) but I
don't have WPA2-Personal or WPA2-PSK options on my Windows XP fully
updated. Something must be wrong with my windows setup so I will keep
looking to see what I need to fix. At least Microsoft constantly updates my
operating system automatically so I don't have to worry about "flashing"
the computer! :)

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I thought I did. It's version 5, and firmware version v1.00.6.
Is there ANOTHER version I need to be aware of?

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I did search for "curl" but I didn't know what to look for. I did find the
linksys forums and searched there and posted there the exact same question.
They said to upgrade the firmware and tell them if it worked or not to stop
the next curl attempt.

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The fix seems good but (see prior) it only fixes "authentication bypass
vulnerability" but not "the CSRF vulnerability" according to the references
cited above.

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Huh. I trust you. Aren't you trying to help me?

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Oh. I was trying to be responsive and courteous to my friends who were
trying to help me. I'll stop replying so as to prevent the confusion and
allow you to get me to the point I need to be.

Thank you!
Debbie

BTW, which is the "right" newsgroup forum for this kind of Linksys WRT54G
security vulnerability solution type of question?

Re: Help my Linksys WRT54G router was broken into using the "curl" command

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I'll look at it later.  It's a holiday and I'm lazy.

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Easy.  Because no router manufacturer has been successfully sued for
damages resulting from security holes, while automobile manufacturers
tend to get sued for anything and everything.

Please note that there are literally huge number of vulnerabilities in
various computer products.  Given time and limited resources, it's
impossible to just TEST for these vulnerabilities, much less find the
time to fix them.

Open Source Vulnerability Database
<http://osvdb.org

Security and Vulnerability announcements
<http://secunia.com
Here's the statistics for MS XP Home:
<http://secunia.com/product/16/?task=statistics
Note that 15% of the 155 vulnerabilities announced since 2003 has NOT
been patched.

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WPA-PSK is exactly the same as WPA-Personal
WPS-RADIUS is exactly the same as WPA-Enterprise
I traced back where the name change came from.  The Wi-Fi Alliance is
more consumer oriented and went for the Personal and Enterprise.  The
IEEE is addicted to acronyms and elected to use PSK and RADIUS.

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<http://support.microsoft.com/kb/893357/
<http://support.microsoft.com/kb/917021/

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Wrong.  Microsloth only automagically updates *CRITICAL* updates or
those that compromise security.  Optional updates must be downloaded
manually.  
   Start -> Run -> wupdmgr
It should start IE6 or IE7 and run Windoze update.  If it suggests you
upgrade to "Microsoft Update", do it.  Then, hit the "Custom" button.
It will grind the hard disk for perhaps 10 minutes deciding what needs
to be updated and present you with a list.  Check EVERYTHING, download
and install.  Shutdown when it demands and reboot.

You're not done yet.  MS Office might need some updates.  Start IE6 or
IE6 and go unto:
<http://office.microsoft.com
In the upper right hand corner, is a tiny obscure well buried button
for Office Update.  Pick your version of MS Office and do the updates.

There are also plenty of applications on your machine that could use
an update and may have vulnerabilities.  Quicktime, Itunes, Winamp,
etc as well as your favorite virus and spyware scanners all need to be
updated.  

If you think this is a drag, you're right.  There should be a unified
update and notification mechanism.  Not this week.  Meanwhile, this is
a good thing for your 15 year old prospective hacker to do after
butchering your lawn.

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Sorry.  You did in another message that didn't arrive until after I
posted my reply.  This is why I don't like a large number of messages.
I get easily lost.

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Ok, you're partially forgiven.  If you had typed in the curl command
(wrapped in double quotes), you would have found all the security
advisories.

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I think we have different criteria for acceptability.  The
authentication problem (curl example) is serious and if unpatched, I
too would consider the WRT54G to be dangerously insecure.  However, I
know of other vulnerabilities and oddities that also might be used to
compromise security that do not warrant such a drastic action like
recycling the router.  
Is the WRT54G useful and fairly safe (after patching)?  Methinks so.
Can Linksys do better?  Probably.
Would a different router do better?  No way to tell.

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Nope.  I'm just a wolf in sheeps clothing.  In may spare time (usually
under the cover of darkness), I join the forces of evil in a never
ending effort to uncover security holes and screwups in computing.  As
a side effect, security does gradually tend to improve.  However, it's
the challenge that gets my attention, not the side effects.  I tend to
do best with social engineering and physical security, but when those
fail, hacking will suffice.  Try not to let it bother you as many of
those that really know what they're doing, didn't learn security from
a book, and also tend to have a checkered past.

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I don't know.  I only infest alt.internet.wireless.  One technical
newsgroup is all I handle in my ever shrinking spare time.

--
Jeff Liebermann     jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann     AE6KS    831-336-2558

Re: Help my Linksys WRT54G router was broken into using the "curl" command
wrote
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 >
I remember your post in uk.telecom.broadband about a month ago where
you'd forgotten the admin password for your router, and wondered how it
could be reset (I remember your name cos it's the same as someone I know
from work).  Did you let your neighbour friend configure your router for
you then?
--
Mike News

Re: Help my Linksys WRT54G router was broken into using the "curl" command

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Go unto the Google Advanced Search:
<http://groups.google.com/advanced_search?hl=en
Inscribe uk.telecom.broadband into the Group field.
Then try various versions of her name and email address in the Author
box.  Nothing found.

Try a Google Profile for Debbie Hurley at:
<http://groups.google.com/groups/profile?enc_user=TBQePxQAAAB_rhC7c_-l3__fLxfOjJrWANzlI28YMOqJoqdK4hA-xw&hl=en
This could be more than one person, but it does list all the groups to
which Debbie Hurley has posted.  57 groups in the pull down box and
uk.telecom.broadband is NOT among them.

Interestingly, her email address changed from dhurley@ieaccess.net to
debbie.hurley@yahoo.com along with a change in IP address in the last
message.  Both appear to be valid.  That should add some additional
fuel to any conspiracy theories.

Punch her IP addresses of 69.110.27.48 or 69.110.17.91 into:
<http://www.geobytes.com/IpLocator.htm
Located near San Jose on SBCglobal/at&t, not in the UK.

Is this really a security newsgroup?


--
Jeff Liebermann     jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann     AE6KS    831-336-2558

Re: Help my Linksys WRT54G router was broken into using the "curl" command
On Wed, 04 Jul 2007 08:03:13 -0700, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
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One thing I'd like to do is change the login name!
I asked on the linksys forums and will check to see if there is a way to
change the login name from just a dumb blank stare to something interesting
so others can't get in so easily through the front door of the router.

I will also read up on how to upgrade the firmware of my router using your
links. Thanks. I love you!

Re: Help my Linksys WRT54G router was broken into using the "curl" command
On Wed, 04 Jul 2007 08:03:13 -0700, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
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What I don't get is why the Linksys WRT54G router has a password but not a
login name. Wouldn't it be MORE SECURE if I could change the login name?

I can type anything I want into the login name field but it doesn't take.

Am I doing something wrong?

Why does the Linksys v5 WRT54G router have a login name if it isn't used?
Likewise with the host name. Why does it have a host name that isn't used
and why can't I just set the hostname to a blank.

It seems topsy turvy to me. Am I wrong?

Re: Help my Linksys WRT54G router was broken into using the "curl" command
wrote:


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Quite, I get the distinct stench of troll......
--
?Ħaah, los gringos otra vez!?

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