Do you turn off "location access" in all the apps that don't need it? - Page 6

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Re: Do you turn off "location access" in all the apps that don't need it?
On 2016-09-24 08:12, tlvp wrote:

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No, it was an spelling error by Horace, not by the application.


--  
Cheers, Carlos.

Re: Do you turn off "location access" in all the apps that don't need it?
On Sat, 24 Sep 2016 16:15:49 +0200, Carlos E.R. wrote:

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I would rather plead nolo contendere to the charges, but, in light of the
facts, my plea is mea culpa.

Re: Do you turn off "location access" in all the apps that don't need it?
On Fri, 23 Sep 2016 18:03:05 -0700, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

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Thanks Jeff.
What I love about *your* responses is that you *back up* what you say.

So, you can be *believed* because you have credibility.

I believe you when you say that the Android clock gets its time zone and
time from the carrier signal.

And, the fact you *tested* that (on WiFi) is great proof of that.
And, that GPS doesn't help the clock drift (I can't see how it would since
the admittedly extremely accurate atomic clock *in* the satellite isn't
sending *that* signal to the phone, is it?).

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That confirms what I had thought.
So, in effect, the clock (and all those other apps) don't *need* location
access.

So why do they bother to force users (who don't know any better) to allow
location access when the clock (system) app is first installed by the
manufacturer?

What *advantage* is it to the clock app, or to the system manufacturer (who
installed the clock app in the first place) to *require* location access?

Makes no sense to me.
Does it make sense to you?

What do they gain?
What can they do with it in a clock app?

Re: Do you turn off "location access" in all the apps that don't need it?
On Sat, 24 Sep 2016 01:23:53 +0000 (UTC), Horace Algiers

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Demographic information (where your customers are located) is very
important for marketing a product, even as small as a smartphone app.
It's also useful for targeting ad campaigns by location.  Location
information is also valuable to marketing research firms, that pay
well for such data.

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Perhaps they want to send a GPS guided missile to your last known
location and exterminate you and the neighborhood for failing to meet
their financial expectations?

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Information is power (and money).  
More information is more power (and money).

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I think it was originally the various free flashlight apps that were
just crammed with data sucking features that would collect data on
almost everything they could find on your phone.  A 20 MByte
flashlight app is almost certain to be doing something evil behind the
curtains.  So, why did they bother?  Because the information was
valuable.  

The one I liked best was the flashlight app that groveled through the
users pictures and videos skimming for the EXIF data, which included
the GPS lat-long when the photo was taken.  That's a fairly good
history of where you've been (and when you were there).  Anyway,
pretend that you're evil and devious (like me).  Think of what you can
deduce from the metadata (everything except the actually file) on your
smartphone.

Fun and Games:  Click on some of the sample photos:
<http://www.pic2map.com
I just uploaded a dumb photo and was presented with my location when
the photo was taken.  Nice.


Topic drift:  This should pin your paranoia meter to full scale:
"Lenovo, Intel, and PayPal Team On Fingerprinting Tech For Online
Payments"
<http://fortune.com/2016/09/23/lenovo-intel-paypal-fingerprint-biometrics/


--  
Jeff Liebermann     jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann     AE6KS    831-336-2558

Re: Do you turn off "location access" in all the apps that don't need it?
On Fri, 23 Sep 2016 18:58:48 -0700, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

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I agree with you Jeff, that knowing *where* you are when you run the clock
app (and the other apps that I mentioned, such as ES File Explorer) is
useful to *them*; but location has nothing to do with *most* of the apps
that I have that require it.

That's why I asked if YOU (plural you) turn off location access in all the
apps that don't need it (which is the vast majority of the ones that
require it, IMHO).

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That would be bad news for the Santa Cruz mountains!
Maybe I can spoof *your* location instead.
You're only a dozen miles distant over the hill!
:)
  
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Yup. But that's why I asked if everyone else turns *off* the location
access of their apps that don't need it!

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Heh heh ... I use Exifer and other proggies on Linux but that site is
useful for all the chest-and-baby photos I get from Anthony Wiener when I
pose as a 15 year old girl. :)

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Yikes. My old single-USB-port WinXP laptop may have to be retired some day,
so that I can get fingerprinted while I type my next Usenet post!

Re: Do you turn off "location access" in all the apps that don't need it?

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it already does with apple pay and android pay.

Re: Do you turn off "location access" in all the apps that don't need it?
On 2016-09-23 21:35, AL wrote:
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To change to the local time of the location you are at.

--  
Cheers, Carlos.

Re: Do you turn off "location access" in all the apps that don't need it?
On Fri, 23 Sep 2016 23:47:54 +0200, Carlos E.R. wrote:

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While a clock app *might* need to know the GPS location in order to figure
out what time zone it's in, "my" clock is doing fine without having access
to the GPS location.

Of course, I haven't changed time zones in the past two days, but, there
*is* a "Date and time" setting in Android 4.3:
XXXXX

Notice that I have set:
[x] Automatic date and time (Use network-provided time)
[x] Automatic time zone (Use network-provided time zone)

So, um, er ... can't the clock get the time and time zone from the
so-called "network-provided" time and time zone?

If the clock is not getting the time and time zone from the network, how
does it get the *time* merely from the GPS location? [It can't.]

Re: Do you turn off "location access" in all the apps that don't need it?
On 2016-09-24 02:04, Horace Algiers wrote:
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It may do fine, but that doesn't mean that the designer of the clock
programmed it that way. As there are location services in the system,
and network time (notice: telephone network, not internet) is not always
accurate, if I were the programmer I would also ask the system for the
current location.


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Yes, so what? That it can does not mean it does. As I said, if I were
programming for Android I would use anything I have available that I
like. I know that I'm not breaking any privacy, so do it.

Telephone network time is known to be problematic, anyway.

--  
Cheers, Carlos.

Re: Do you turn off "location access" in all the apps that don't need it?
On Sat, 24 Sep 2016 00:04:40 +0000 (UTC), Horace Algiers wrote:

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I forgot to include the screenshot:
http://i.cubeupload.com/PGzaHa.png

 Notice that I have set:
 [x] Automatic date and time (Use network-provided time)
 [x] Automatic time zone (Use network-provided time zone)

I don't know where the clock app gets its time and time zone from, but it
would seem to me it would just need to get it from the system clock and
system location, which can be provided by the carrier, it seems.

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