What's Actually Involved In Provisioning A Cable Modem?

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Does the head-end see anything other than the MAC?

The reason I知 asking, is that I知 planning to replace the RCA modem
Roadrunner provided with a Linksys WCG200.

I was thinking of simply cloning the MAC from the RCA and swapping the
units.  No mus, no fuss, and RR doesn稚 have to get involved.

Anybody know if this will work or not?

Thanks,

A_C

Re: What's Actually Involved In Provisioning A Cable Modem?


Agent_C wrote:
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What makes you think you can clone a MAC address to a new cablemodem?

Even if you were able to do this, why would you think a Linksys modem
would work with a RCA firmware and an RCA config file? It's more likely
that the Linksys would be permanently trashed than it is that it would
work.

So what's the point of it all if you're going to continue to rent the
RCA?

Why is it that you don't want the cable company to know what modem it is
that you're really using? What do you think you're trying to accomplish?
What is it that you're trying to cover-up? What do you think you'd be
gaining, or what do you think you'd be avoiding by circumventing
something as simple as getting a new cablemodem provisioned?

--
Warren H.

==========
Disclaimer: My views reflect those of myself, and not my
employer, my friends, nor (as she often tells me) my wife.
Any resemblance to the views of anybody living or dead is
coincidental. No animals were hurt in the writing of this
response -- unless you count my dog who desperately wants
to go outside now.

     Power Lawncare Tools for Spring Clean-up:
   http://www.holzemville.com/mall/blackanddecker /




Re: What's Actually Involved In Provisioning A Cable Modem?


wrote:

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Geessss... Paranoid a little????

I'm converting to the Linksys because it's a modem/router combo. Less
clutter on my desk.

If at all possible, I'd simply like to do it myself. The less you have
the 'techs' at Roadrunner involved, the less chance they have of
messing something up.

Are you always so accusatory?

A_C





Re: What's Actually Involved In Provisioning A Cable Modem?



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DOCSIS is DOCSIS.

I've called my cable company a couple times as I've switched out cable
modems, and all they ask for is the MAC address.  Period.  They don't
care about brand name or model number.

DOCSIS is DOCSIS, period.


Re: Re: What's Actually Involved In Provisioning A Cable Modem?


On Fri, 14 Apr 2006 15:30:35 -0400, "Elmo P. Shagnasty"


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That would have been my impression, but I've never done this before.
Who's your cable company?

A_C


Re: What's Actually Involved In Provisioning A Cable Modem?



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WOW.


Re: What's Actually Involved In Provisioning A Cable Modem?


"Elmo P. Shagnasty" wrote:
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    That may vary with the ISP.  In my area (S. Cal), Comcast
    wants to know the brand and model no. so they can verify
    that it's on their extensive list of approved equipment.  I
    guess they don't trust a manufacturer's declaration of
    DOCSIS compliance, or more likely, they don't trust a
    customer's claim that his/her modem is DOCSIS compliant.
    But that may also vary whether you speak to a technician
    or a front office rep.  The technician didn't seem to care
    and he took my word that the modem was DOCSIS 2.0
    compliant   The front office rep wanted to know the make
    and model no., but when she couldn't find it, she just agreed
    with me that if the manufacturer said that it was DOCSIS 2.0
    compliant it was OK.  I suspect also that since the MAC nos.
    are assigned to manufacturers in blocks, the MAC no. may
    tell the ISP the make and model.

    Anyway, withing a couple minutes of the tech taking down
    the MAC no., the modem was functioning.

*TimDaniels*

Re: What's Actually Involved In Provisioning A Cable Modem?


Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

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That is because from the MAC they can tell all they need to know.. maker..
and maybe even model....

hell.. I can at least look up the maker now....



Re: What's Actually Involved In Provisioning A Cable Modem?


lars wrote:

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Once you have the MAC address, you can query the modem via SNTP and determine
just exactly what it is.  So I doubt they need any more than the MAC address
to do the provisioning.  Asking for the make/model is just giving them info
they're about to find out on their own shortly.

Re: What's Actually Involved In Provisioning A Cable Modem?


Elmo Wrote: "DOCSIS is DOCSIS.

I've called my cable company a couple times as I've switched out cable
modems, and all they ask for is the MAC address.  Period.  They don't
care about brand name or model number.

DOCSIS is DOCSIS, period."

Well, sort of. Yes, there are minimum standard things that all DOCSIS
ceritified modems have to do. And, yes, most cable companies have a
generic provisioning file that can be used by any modem. However, there
are a whole slew of vendor-specific options that can be implemented
(anyone remember the RCA DCM105 e-mail light? It could be activiated by
the .cm file and an SNMP trap). Most of the time, it has to do with
port blocking and snmp traps, but just about anything can be done and
labeled "vendor specific." We once had a problem that only affected 1
brand of modem, because someone at corporate added a bunch of blocked
ports to the config files and all 2000+ of this model decided to quit
working one Saturday morning. The modems in question could only handle
blocking a few ports, so they just locked up.

The other big problem is when there is a firmware upgrade. This is a
flag set in the .cm file telling the modem that a new version is
available, and the release ID. The ID is compared to the firmware in
the modem, and if they don't match, the modem will retrieve the new
file. If you got the wrong type of modem, even a different make from
the same vendor, you stand a very high likelyhood of trashing your
modem.

Now, there are a few other ways to determine the manufacturer of a
cablemodem. One is to use the MAC address
(http://coffer.com/mac_find /). Theoretically, one could determine the
manufacturer and product by decoding the assigned MAC address and
passing that info on to the provisioning system.

It is also possible to read the make and model number from an SNMP
browser, and pass it along to the provisioning system. While this would
be very cool, it would require another server to be maintained, and
there is the very real possibility of having a MIB report back an OEM
instead of the real manufacturer (I recall this happening with Zyxel
modem/routers, which reported a totally different modem and would have
made them useless as a modem/router had we provisioned them using the
other modem's config).

But, why bother? It is much more accurate and reliable to get a human
in the loop to read off the model number on the box and get it to the
billing system, which then will pass it on to the provisioning system.

Agent_C Wrote: "The reason I'm asking, is that I'm planning to
replace the RCA modem
Roadrunner provided with a Linksys WCG200."

I can't speak for TW Roadrunner, but with Comcast, this modem will not
work without Comcast's firmware (which is not available unless you go
with the home networking option). The reason is because the retail
version of the software will not pass on a second DHCP request for the
router, and will attempt to route using the CM's internal address. They
do say " While Comcast will support this modem's connectivity to the
Internet, please direct any issues with the router or wireless Internet
functionality to the vendor." It will provision, but that's all you'll
be able to do (at least as of last summer). Again, this is on Comcast's
network. You should really check with TW before you buy it, unless you
know you can return it.


Re: Re: What's Actually Involved In Provisioning A Cable Modem?



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Thanks, that was extremely helpful.

A_C

Re: What's Actually Involved In Provisioning A Cable Modem?


Agent_C wrote:

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I don't know specifically what RR does when provisioning a modem.

It could be as simple as plugging the new modem in and supplying
your info to a web page.  Or you may have to actually call them.

I would plug the new modem and and see what happens.  If it's not
obvious that it's being provisioned, make a call and/or put the
old modem back until you can.

Re: What's Actually Involved In Provisioning A Cable Modem?


As far as I am aware, you cannot clone the RF MAC on the cable modem as you
would with your router's LAN MAC to make it appear to be that of your NIC.
Should just be able to have the cable co. put your new modem on your account
and provision it as opposed to the one they issued you.

--
Jimbo

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