wifi to cover large house


Hi.
I need to set-up a wireless network to cover a rather large house, 3
stories, approximately 4500 square feet. To further complicate matters,
the cable modem is at one end of the house and wiring the house is not
an option.
I've done several hours of research online and the best solution I've
come up with so far is the LinkSys WRT54G with several WAP54G's in
"wireless repeater" mode.
So basically, my questions are:
1) does this seem like a reasonable solution?
and
2) can anyone recommend a better solution?
Thanks!
Dale
Reply to
Dale I. Green
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"Dale I. Green" wrote in news:Xns98DD2E78625Adigatnotmaildotcom@216.196.97.142:
Continued research led me to another option, HomePlug. I'm thinking I could purchase several HomePlug adapters and locate them strategically about the house then attach a wireless access point to each. I've had success using multiple access points over CAT5 and it seems the HomePlug would simply be replacing the CAT5. Do I have this right?
Thanks again.
Dale
Reply to
Dale I. Green
It may work but have someone check the wiring just in case there is a phase split .
Reply to
atec 77
In article , atec 77 wrote:
Please elaborate on phase shift WRT data over residential power.
Thanks
Reply to
Al Dykes
Homeplug aka powerline networking will work perfectly in your scenario (probably cheaper too). Even easier, netgear makes a unit that goes by the cable modem, plugs into that a power strip and the wap/router, and the second unit (that is also a wireless access point) plugs in anywhere else in the home and uses powerline networking to bridge to the router, and then uses that to create a wireless signal in whatever area it is plugged into...
see Powerline Wireless Access Points (54 mbps about $130 for two/both units)
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if you want to do wired instead of wireless, same scenario (wap/router by the cable modem, and one of these plugged into the wap/router by the cable modem, and then the second unit plugged in wherever you want it bridged too)
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(85mbps about $120 for both units)
In case you are wondering, yes, you can have both types at once (I have both, and a linksys wrt54g wap/router) all plugged into my cable modem and a powerstrip.. I use the wired at one end of the house on a laptop with no wireless, and the wireless one in my sisters room (or the backyard when it's armer out) since she has wireless on her laptop... If you are wondering about multiple units, yes, I essentially have two units (one wired one wireless) connected to my wap router at all times, and during the winter use two plug in transceivers, but when warm have the ones that are like an ap and that I plug in (so I can use the sunroom or backyard)
If you decide to have multiple wap/routers and each one bridged via the second above, turn off the dhpc server on the additional units (so you only have one on the unit by the modem) and just plug into the router ports - *not* the wan input port on the additional units (essentially turning the extra units into just wap's)
Reply to
Peter Pan
"Peter Pan" wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@mid.individual.net:
Thanks Peter! I think I will give this a try, but will use my own WAPs. This will allow me to more easily upgrade the wireless coverage later.
Reply to
Dale I. Green
atec 77 wrote in news:45daffb4$0$1150$61c65585 @un-2park-reader-01.sydney.pipenetworks.com.au:
Thanks atec, but how would someone check the phase between 2 outlets? Is there a tool to do this? Or would simply trying a HomePlug device make it obvious? (i.e. same phase, HomePlug works / different phase, HomePlug does not work)
Reply to
Dale I. Green
the house being large may be wired with two separate phases , you need someone who knows about such things to check the board , although plugging some of your units will also tell/
Reply to
atec 77

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