Tools to Make a Cantenna


I made my first Cantenna the other day using a 4 " diameter by 6 "
length
tin food can.
The gain was not great but it did allow me to focus the signal without
moving the laptop around and it did allow me to narrow down where a
signal was coming from which was difficult with just the laptop.
I struggled a bit with the tools and had to improvise a lot.
What tools do you recommend ?
Is there a tool kit on ebay I can buy ?
Reply to
sam1967
Loading thread data ...
do you have a photograph of the inside of the cantenna ? where does the USB adapator sit ?
Reply to
sam1967
For my tin cantenna, I needed only a pair of pliers and a drill. Pretty straightforward.
formatting link
formatting link
Bob
Reply to
Bob Alston
Sorry no photo of the inside of the can. Read the article carefully. The USB wi-fi adapter sticks into the can thru the drilled hole on the side. YOu calculate the distance of the hold from the end/bottom of the can. Then just stick it straight in, leaving the USB connector on the outside of the hole.
If you do some googling on "tin cantenna" USB you should find more info.
Bob
Reply to
Bob Alston
New Zealand uses mini-USBs in various parabolic reflectors.
formatting link
Bob Alston's coffee can
formatting link
Dold's coffee can
formatting link
used the turnpoint calculator to decide where to poke the hole.
formatting link
Taylor's standard USB cantenna
formatting link

Reply to
dold
David
My main problem was getting the n connector fitted properly on the can, I used the chassis mount connector and tried to solder it on but it fell off and i resorted to taping it on using gaffer tape.
do you screw yours on ?
ps
i liked the plastic duct cover . i am trying to get hold of some now.
Reply to
sam1967
formatting link
Actually! ;)
David.
Reply to
David Taylor
I used a 140 watt soldering gun, rather than a pencil type soldering iron. Once I get a corner tacked in place with the soldering gun, I can fill the gaps with solder, or at least seal all the way arond, if not all the way out to the points. I leave the N-connector oriented with two points touching the can, adn two waving out in space.
I've read some about using screws. You need to have the srew heads on the inside of the can, in order to avoid inserting little tuning stubs into the RF cavity, and unless you pad the corners of the connector with washers, you will probably deform the can, which I presume is not good.
Reply to
dold
But the rest of the site makes interesting reading.
Someone can always "Click here to go straight to mark 3 of the antenna".
Nice to see you back.
Reply to
dold
David
I am using the chassis/panel mount with 4 screw holes. I may try the other type you suggested.
I am trying to find a suitable cover for the cantenna and likde your kitchen ducting.
I believe it is also possible to cover it with PVC.
Can you tell me what I should search for ?
So far I have only come up with sticky back plastic.
Reply to
sam1967
There's a couple you could use, one which is the panel mount with 4 screw holes, that's easy as is the panel mount one with the single big nut so just drill a large hole and put the nut on the other side.
Not sure what type of connector you have?
David.
Reply to
David Taylor
Probably but given that it's all "fun" I'll offer that in the grand scheme of things, you probably won't see a huge difference.
David.
Reply to
David Taylor
Thanks even though the hosting co staff moved stuff around and have buggered up the site a bit. Haven't had time to sort it out.
I'll be mooching from time to time. :)
David.
Reply to
David Taylor
Personally I wouldn't cover it in PVC, but rather use the 4" vent ducting but to be honest, if it's a metal cantenna that you're making, just paint it if you want to stop it going rusty. :)
David.
Reply to
David Taylor

Cabling-Design.com Forums website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.