WiFi Range Extension

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In addition to covering my immediate home, I'd like to also cover a
house located 1 mile from mine, both off my home DSL line.

The range extenders I see advertised on the Web appear aimed at creating
a larger single coverage area, while I need two different coverage
areas.  I'm looking for a way to connect my home DSL to both service
areas.  It seems unlikely that a directional antenna at my home would do
the trick because the path is obstructed, so I assume I'll need APs in
both areas.

Anyone able to recommend a solution?

Re: WiFi Range Extension



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Obstruction can be a *big* problem.  Assume you'll at least need in the
other house both (a) a client bridge with directional antenna wired to
(b) a wireless access point.

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First test with the client bridge.

See the links below for more information.

--
Best regards,   FAQ for Wireless Internet: <http://Wireless.wikia.com
John Navas      FAQ for Wi-Fi:  <http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi
           Wi-Fi How To: <http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi_How_To
Fixes to Wi-Fi Problems:  <http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi_Fixes

Re: WiFi Range Extension



John Navas wrote:
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Perhaps I'm missing something here, but why set up a bridge? Why not
set up two wifi box doing mac to mac, and just plug it into the DSL
router. It's not like this guy wants to offer a wifi service in
general, but rather just one to a particular house. I don't know if mac
ot mac is offered in every router, but it is standard on Dlink.


Re: WiFi Range Extension


On 14 Jun 2006 22:17:47 -0700, miso@sushi.com wrote in

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"mac to mac???"  Have no idea what you mean.  Macintosh to Macintosh?
MAC address filtering?  Big Mac to Big Mac?  Please elucidate.

--
Best regards,   FAQ for Wireless Internet: <http://Wireless.wikia.com
John Navas      FAQ for Wi-Fi:  <http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi
           Wi-Fi How To: <http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi_How_To
Fixes to Wi-Fi Problems:  <http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi_Fixes

Re: WiFi Range Extension



John Navas wrote:
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Mac as in the mac address of your router. I forget what it stands for,
but every router has a unique mac address. Dlink has a mode where you
can set them up to only talk to one specific mac address. Here is some
random link on the mac address:
http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/M/MAC_address.html

It is quite a pain that mac brings up all these apple links that are
quite irrelevant to the issue at hand. This mac to mac is probably not
found routers, only WAPs. I suppose you could get the equivalent
setting up a WAP and client, then use mac filtering to only allow those
two specific boxes.


Re: WiFi Range Extension


On 15 Jun 2006 09:33:30 -0700, miso@sushi.com wrote in

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Ah, MAC address filtering.  Essentially worthless because it's too
easily spoofed.  And WEB is too easily cracked.  So only use WPA with a
strong passphrase.

The reason for the client bridge and access point at the remote location
is that the OP wanted wireless coverage at the remote location.

--
Best regards,   FAQ for Wireless Internet: <http://Wireless.wikia.com
John Navas      FAQ for Wi-Fi:  <http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi
           Wi-Fi How To: <http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi_How_To
Fixes to Wi-Fi Problems:  <http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi_Fixes

Re: WiFi Range Extension



John Navas wrote:
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The way I read it, he wanted coverage at his house and at the remote
location, so the mac to mac would be for the remote location.


Re: WiFi Range Extension


On 15 Jun 2006 11:45:45 -0700, miso@sushi.com wrote in

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I must be dense, but that still makes no sense to me -- "mac to mac" is
a term I've never heard and can't find.  What exactly is it supposed to
mean?  If MAC address filtering, that isn't a way to connect a remote
site -- it's simply a means of security, and an ineffective one at that.
What exactly are you proposing?  Doing away with the remote client
bridge?  Doing away with the remote access point?  How?

--
Best regards,   FAQ for Wireless Internet: <http://Wireless.wikia.com
John Navas      FAQ for Wi-Fi:  <http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi
           Wi-Fi How To: <http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi_How_To
Fixes to Wi-Fi Problems:  <http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi_Fixes

Re: WiFi Range Extension



John Navas wrote:
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Actually, I'm  the problem here. Dlink now calls this PTP bridge.
However, in my quite limited experience in networking, when you bridge
a network, it looks like one network, sometimes creating headaches.
When I used this mac to mac (my term), the networks weren't bridged as
far as I know, but rather the wireless network just asked like a piece
of wire.

I just checked the manual, and back then they used the term wireless
bridge. The mac to mac was how I remembered the mode, as you had to
specify the mac address of each device. Sorry to waste your time here
or cause you a headache or two.



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Re: WiFi Range Extension


miso@sushi.com hath wroth:

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That's the correct term.  Point to Point bridge.  There's also Point
to Multipoint bridging which is actually a wireless switch.  (A switch
is a bridge with more than 2 ports).

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Ummm... the whole idea behind connecting two networks with a bridge is
to make it look like one big network, while offering some control over
the traffic at the bridge.  With two networks, you wouldn't want ALL
the traffic to cross over the bridge.  Just the packets that need to
cross.

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Wrong.  Wireless bridges are the same as wired bridges.  Only packets
with a destination MAC address that's across the bridge, go across the
bridge.  Packets with no destination address (i.e. broadcasts) go
across anyway.  If you plug an access point into an existing network,
with LOTS of traffic, and connect to it with an ordinary wireless
client (or wireless bridge client), you would not want to get
innundated with all the traffic on the network.  The access point and
client work together to act exactly as a wired bridge and only pass
traffic with destination MAC addresses on the other side of the
bridge.  If it were to act like your "piece of wire" it would pass
everything.

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Never heard of MAC to MAC.  Please don't invent any new terms.  There
are plenty of confusing bridge types to chose from.
  http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi#Wireless_Bridge

--
Jeff Liebermann     jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann     AE6KS    831-336-2558

Re: WiFi Range Extension



Jeff Liebermann wrote:
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Now Jeff, really, was this comment called for? Geez. Chill.


 There
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Re: WiFi Range Extension


On 16 Jun 2006 10:07:40 -0700, miso@sushi.com wrote in

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Speaking only for myself, it's frustrating to needlessly waste time
trying to figure out what some invented term is supposed to mean, thus
taking time away from more productive exercises.  That's part of why
correct terminology is so important, and why Jeff was so right on.

--
Best regards,   FAQ for Wireless Internet: <http://Wireless.wikia.com
John Navas      FAQ for Wi-Fi:  <http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi
           Wi-Fi How To: <http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi_How_To
Fixes to Wi-Fi Problems:  <http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi_Fixes

Re: WiFi Range Extension



John Navas wrote:
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He would have been right on if I didn't apologize and post both the old
and new term that Dlink was using. Given my mea culpa, right on is not
a phrase I would use for his antics.


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Re: WiFi Range Extension


On 16 Jun 2006 14:38:55 -0700, miso@sushi.com wrote in

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With all due respect, I found your further explanation to be pretty much
unintelligible.  In fact I still don't know what you meant in your
original response, in part because you didn't answer my follow-up
questions.  It's been a frustrating waste of time.  No offense intended.

--
Best regards,   FAQ for Wireless Internet: <http://Wireless.wikia.com
John Navas      FAQ for Wi-Fi:  <http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi
           Wi-Fi How To: <http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi_How_To
Fixes to Wi-Fi Problems:  <http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi_Fixes

Re: WiFi Range Extension



John Navas wrote:
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I replied to each of your posts. Perhaps you need to be more specific
regarding your questions.



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Re: WiFi Range Extension


On 17 Jun 2006 18:59:36 -0700, miso@sushi.com wrote in

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As I wrote, and with all due respect, I found (and still find) your
further explanation to be pretty much unintelligible.

--
Best regards,   FAQ for Wireless Internet: <http://Wireless.wikia.com
John Navas      FAQ for Wi-Fi:  <http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi
           Wi-Fi How To: <http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi_How_To
Fixes to Wi-Fi Problems:  <http://wireless.wikia.com/wiki/Wi-Fi_Fixes

Re: WiFi Range Extension


miso@sushi.com hath wroth:

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Yep, I think it was appropriate.  In case you haven't noticed, I'm not
into diplomacy.  

Google does not show anything for "MAC to MAC".  I've never heard of
the term.  It does sorta make sense, but "point to point" bridging is
already adquate.  If you want to defend the term, please cite a
situation where it would uniquely describe the topology.  Otherwise,
please use one of the existing terms.

What I'm trying to avoid is something like a:
  "wireless workgroup bridge client game station infrastructure
  ethernet adapter"
which is the result of yet another company adding their contrived term
(station) to an existing definition.  I also made an attempt to
untangle the various terms for wireless bridging in the FAQ, to try to
undo some of the damage.  Yes, I think my comment is justified if for
no better reason than it makes more work for me.  

Oh, by the way, you're welcome.

--
Jeff Liebermann     jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann     AE6KS    831-336-2558

Re: WiFi Range Extension



Jeff Liebermann wrote:
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Yes. I noticed. Well, it gains Ann Coulter so much respent, so you go
girl.

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Re: WiFi Range Extension


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How obstructed is it?  Unless you've got a good line of sight, any
2.4GHz gear is very probably going to fail.

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