Mitel SX-2000: how to (un)block area codes

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We have an SX-2000 that is (I think) currently blocking calls to area
code 809 (the Dominican Republic.) I haven't been able to find anyplace
in the switch that deals with this sort of thing, although I seem to
recall stumbling over it once while looking for something else.

I can't find any reference to such blocking in the Features and
Services binder so maybe it is not the switch doing this. Can it? And
where would I find its table in CDE?

Thanks for any pointers,

r



Re: Mitel SX-2000: how to (un)block area codes
reedl@tatteredcover.com writes:

>We have an SX-2000 that is (I think) currently blocking calls to area
>code 809 (the Dominican Republic.) I haven't been able to find anyplace
>in the switch that deals with this sort of thing, although I seem to
>recall stumbling over it once while looking for something else.

>I can't find any reference to such blocking in the Features and
>Services binder so maybe it is not the switch doing this. Can it? And
>where would I find its table in CDE?

>Thanks for any pointers,

There are a number of ways to block area 809 (or any particular digit
string or range of digits for that matter) on the SX-2000

First of all, blocked simply by omission. In other words, the digit string
'809' does not appear in the ARS table and there are no wildcard
combinations programmed to include this range.  Open the AU (automatic
Route Select) table, type in leading digit '8' and hit recall. With this
table open, look for the digits dialed 09 and # of digits to follow = 7
- OR leading digits 8 and "unknown" to follow, or leading digits '80' with
8 digits to follow.  If none of these combinations appear then 809 is
blocked by omission.  You dial 809-xx etc and the phone displays "invalid"

Secondly, blocked explicitly.  This time one of the above described
scenarios exists and is directed to a specific route. The route contains a
trunk group but the trunk group contains only 1 trunk. The trunk
assignment form shows an "Interconnect" number. You check the Interconnect
Restriction table to find that the interconnect number assigned to the
trunk is restricted from accessing all 64 other interconnects.  You dial
809-xx etc and the phone displays "CALL BARRED"

Thirdly, blocked permissively. In this scenario only specific numbers in
area 809 appear in the ARS table. Companies do this when they have a
business relationship there, i.e., with a bank, and so they wish to
"allow" only a handful of numbers, perhaps only one or two, and so the
entire digit string(s) of the ALLOWED numbers would appear in the ARS
table.

Fourth, blocked by a simple digit conflict.  Example, to place a call to
a/c 809 you might have to dial 9-1-809-xxx-xxxx. To stop these calls you
need only program up a DN on the pbx with the extension "91809".  Try to
dial a number in a/c 809 and you'll never get past the 91809 part of the
call. A really tricky to do this is to bury "91809" in the feature access
code table.

Fifth, blocked by customer request at the LEC or LD carrier. Here the
customer has requested their LD provider to block area 809 for them. This
is really simple to do and is usually provided as a free or no-charge
service. You can test this easily by dialing the Individual Trunk Select
feature code + the 4-digit trunk number of one of your outside trunks,
followed by 1-809-xxx-xxxx. If the call goes through, your LEC or IXC is
not the one blocking these calls.

I could go on, but you probably get the idea.

WDG



Re: Mitel SX-2000: how to (un)block area codes
And finally if you don't understand how COR works you shouldn't be dicking
around in your switch.

> reedl@tatteredcover.com writes:
>
>>We have an SX-2000 that is (I think) currently blocking calls to area
>>code 809 (the Dominican Republic.) I haven't been able to find anyplace
>>in the switch that deals with this sort of thing, although I seem to
>>recall stumbling over it once while looking for something else.
>
>>I can't find any reference to such blocking in the Features and
>>Services binder so maybe it is not the switch doing this. Can it? And
>>where would I find its table in CDE?
>
>>Thanks for any pointers,
>
> There are a number of ways to block area 809 (or any particular digit
> string or range of digits for that matter) on the SX-2000
>
> First of all, blocked simply by omission. In other words, the digit string
> '809' does not appear in the ARS table and there are no wildcard
> combinations programmed to include this range.  Open the AU (automatic
> Route Select) table, type in leading digit '8' and hit recall. With this
> table open, look for the digits dialed 09 and # of digits to follow = 7
> - OR leading digits 8 and "unknown" to follow, or leading digits '80' with
> 8 digits to follow.  If none of these combinations appear then 809 is
> blocked by omission.  You dial 809-xx etc and the phone displays "invalid"
>
> Secondly, blocked explicitly.  This time one of the above described
> scenarios exists and is directed to a specific route. The route contains a
> trunk group but the trunk group contains only 1 trunk. The trunk
> assignment form shows an "Interconnect" number. You check the Interconnect
> Restriction table to find that the interconnect number assigned to the
> trunk is restricted from accessing all 64 other interconnects.  You dial
> 809-xx etc and the phone displays "CALL BARRED"
>
> Thirdly, blocked permissively. In this scenario only specific numbers in
> area 809 appear in the ARS table. Companies do this when they have a
> business relationship there, i.e., with a bank, and so they wish to
> "allow" only a handful of numbers, perhaps only one or two, and so the
> entire digit string(s) of the ALLOWED numbers would appear in the ARS
> table.
>
> Fourth, blocked by a simple digit conflict.  Example, to place a call to
> a/c 809 you might have to dial 9-1-809-xxx-xxxx. To stop these calls you
> need only program up a DN on the pbx with the extension "91809".  Try to
> dial a number in a/c 809 and you'll never get past the 91809 part of the
> call. A really tricky to do this is to bury "91809" in the feature access
> code table.
>
> Fifth, blocked by customer request at the LEC or LD carrier. Here the
> customer has requested their LD provider to block area 809 for them. This
> is really simple to do and is usually provided as a free or no-charge
> service. You can test this easily by dialing the Individual Trunk Select
> feature code + the 4-digit trunk number of one of your outside trunks,
> followed by 1-809-xxx-xxxx. If the call goes through, your LEC or IXC is
> not the one blocking these calls.
>
> I could go on, but you probably get the idea.
>
> WDG
>




Re: Mitel SX-2000: how to (un)block area codes
Whats wrong with the scientific method ?


> And finally if you don't understand how COR works you shouldn't be dicking
> around in your switch.
>
>> reedl@tatteredcover.com writes:
>>
>>>We have an SX-2000 that is (I think) currently blocking calls to area
>>>code 809 (the Dominican Republic.) I haven't been able to find anyplace
>>>in the switch that deals with this sort of thing, although I seem to
>>>recall stumbling over it once while looking for something else.
>>
>>>I can't find any reference to such blocking in the Features and
>>>Services binder so maybe it is not the switch doing this. Can it? And
>>>where would I find its table in CDE?
>>
>>>Thanks for any pointers,
>>
>> There are a number of ways to block area 809 (or any particular digit
>> string or range of digits for that matter) on the SX-2000
>>
>> First of all, blocked simply by omission. In other words, the digit
>> string
>> '809' does not appear in the ARS table and there are no wildcard
>> combinations programmed to include this range.  Open the AU (automatic
>> Route Select) table, type in leading digit '8' and hit recall. With this
>> table open, look for the digits dialed 09 and # of digits to follow = 7
>> - OR leading digits 8 and "unknown" to follow, or leading digits '80'
>> with
>> 8 digits to follow.  If none of these combinations appear then 809 is
>> blocked by omission.  You dial 809-xx etc and the phone displays
>> "invalid"
>>
>> Secondly, blocked explicitly.  This time one of the above described
>> scenarios exists and is directed to a specific route. The route contains
>> a
>> trunk group but the trunk group contains only 1 trunk. The trunk
>> assignment form shows an "Interconnect" number. You check the
>> Interconnect
>> Restriction table to find that the interconnect number assigned to the
>> trunk is restricted from accessing all 64 other interconnects.  You dial
>> 809-xx etc and the phone displays "CALL BARRED"
>>
>> Thirdly, blocked permissively. In this scenario only specific numbers in
>> area 809 appear in the ARS table. Companies do this when they have a
>> business relationship there, i.e., with a bank, and so they wish to
>> "allow" only a handful of numbers, perhaps only one or two, and so the
>> entire digit string(s) of the ALLOWED numbers would appear in the ARS
>> table.
>>
>> Fourth, blocked by a simple digit conflict.  Example, to place a call to
>> a/c 809 you might have to dial 9-1-809-xxx-xxxx. To stop these calls you
>> need only program up a DN on the pbx with the extension "91809".  Try to
>> dial a number in a/c 809 and you'll never get past the 91809 part of the
>> call. A really tricky to do this is to bury "91809" in the feature access
>> code table.
>>
>> Fifth, blocked by customer request at the LEC or LD carrier. Here the
>> customer has requested their LD provider to block area 809 for them. This
>> is really simple to do and is usually provided as a free or no-charge
>> service. You can test this easily by dialing the Individual Trunk Select
>> feature code + the 4-digit trunk number of one of your outside trunks,
>> followed by 1-809-xxx-xxxx. If the call goes through, your LEC or IXC is
>> not the one blocking these calls.
>>
>> I could go on, but you probably get the idea.
>>
>> WDG
>>
>
>




Re: Mitel SX-2000: how to (un)block area codes

>Whats wrong with the scientific method ?

Okay, I'll bite. Explain the 'scientific method' to us.

With a PBX the class of the SX2000 and which is supported by a technical
staff with at least half a brain, you're apt to find all of the "manual
pic" (i.e., the 10-10 stuff and 800# direct carrier access) blocked and
find the 0 and 0+ stuff either blocked as well or redirected to an
internal attendant (or requiring use of an independent account code). I
like the acct. code method personally as it places accountability directly
on the employee who thereafter can no longer claim that, "its the cleaning
people using my phone at night."

When programming your routing tables to block the Dominican Republic, one
has to first realize that today area Code 809 hardly resembles its former
self. The original AC 809 now includes more than a dozen splits and
overlays, including: 242, 264, 268, 284, 345, 441, 473, 664, 758, 767,
784, 787, 809, 868, 869, 876. Where shall we begin?



Re: Mitel SX-2000: how to (un)block area codes

>
>>Whats wrong with the scientific method ?
>
> Okay, I'll bite. Explain the 'scientific method' to us.
>
>
1. Observe a phenomenon
2. Form a theory
3. Design an experiment
4. Dick with the switch
5. Refine the theory
6. Go to 3.

TerryS




Re: Mitel SX-2000: how to (un)block area codes
>
>> Okay, I'll bite. Explain the 'scientific method' to us.

>1. Observe a phenomenon
>2. Form a theory
>3. Design an experiment

3a. make a backup of the active config

>4. Dick with the switch
.... making notes of -eveything- that you change (screen prints are
    your friend)

>5. Refine the theory
5a. undick whatever was changed in step 4

>6. Go to 3.

7. restore backup.

Not that I've ever skipped 3a and 5a...

z!



Re: Mitel SX-2000: how to (un)block area codes
Of course one could also take the one-week Mitel system admin course, aka
CDE School. But that'd be too easy, besides you might accidentally learn
something.


Zwanzig) writes:

>>
>>> Okay, I'll bite. Explain the 'scientific method' to us.
>
>>1. Observe a phenomenon
>>2. Form a theory
>>3. Design an experiment
>
>3a. make a backup of the active config
>
>>4. Dick with the switch
>... making notes of -eveything- that you change (screen prints are
>    your friend)
>
>>5. Refine the theory
>5a. undick whatever was changed in step 4
>
>>6. Go to 3.
>
>7. restore backup.
>
>Not that I've ever skipped 3a and 5a...
>
>z!



Re: Mitel SX-2000: how to (un)block area codes
Catching up on net news...

>Of course one could also take the one-week Mitel system admin course, aka
>CDE School. But that'd be too easy, besides you might accidentally learn
>something.

If I was working with the boxes on a regular basis, you can bet that I'd
take as much training as I could get. Since I'm not, I have to rely on the
practices when I can get them, intelligence when I can find it, and a
healthy paranoia all the time :-). But, then again, I know what RTFM
stands for. Pity so few people do.

First question of the SYS$UPDATE:VMSINSTAL script (VMS):
"Are you satisfied with the backup of your system disk?"

z!
-who just found where he'd hidden his BSPs from the '70s


Re: Mitel SX-2000: how to (un)block area codes

>And finally if you don't understand how COR works you shouldn't be dicking
>around in your switch.

Good point ;)

In fact even some "Certified" techs wind up getting confused and befuddled
trying to program and implement COR. So many in fact that -M- has recently
published a brief tech bulletin solely devoted to the subject. I think
what confuses people is that the COR feature functions on reverse logic in
both the SX2K and SX200, in spite of the fact that the core in each was
independentally written by separate teams who did not (were not permitted
to) collaborate.




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