Antiques are here (Orionics Splicers)

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Splicers got here today. No manuals, so I'm either limping along without
or raising the ante considerably (66% more) to get those. If anyone has
them and a bit of sympathy for a low-budget school project, please feel
free to contact me.

The 303 appears to be fully manual, and has this odd arrangement of
pointing the fibers down (30 degrees or so) to the splice zone, then
bending them as they enter it.

The 304A is much more similar to "modern" units, in that the fiber path
is straight through, and there appear to be electric as well as manual
positioners. That also has a T&B 92208 cleaver bolted to it.

I haven't turned either one on yet. They are filthy in a way that you
never want to see fiber equipment be, but which is far from unusual in
26/7 year old equipment that's knocked around a college, which is
supposedly what it's been doing. Doesn't help that the 'Bay vendor
didn't bother to zip the inside pouches closed before dropping them off
at the UPS Store - who did a fine job packing them, but of course they
would not have opened them up. So various things from the pouches were
rattling around in the cases... I think I'll start with opening them up
and removing the (likely very dead) internal batteries and whatever
small junk (I see fiber scraps) has fallen down in the the lower case,
as well as looking for signs of magic smoke escape before I apply power.

I might also see about fabricating some namby-pamby new-fangled stuff
like an arc shield...I could even be cuter than most of the new machines
and use a welding filter for that so you can see a little of what goes
on (and still see afterwards) ;-)

They both appear to have spare electrodes, though one set looks like
it's probably used "spare" and the other looks more like a new set. The
303 has a large packet of power transistors and some other chips, which
implies that it might be a little needy in that department.

I'm a long way from splicing yet, but looking pretty good for the amount
invested so far.

--
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Please don't feed the trolls. Killfile and ignore them so they will go away.

Re: Antiques are here (Orionics Splicers)
Interesting find. Some of the old fiber magazines are in google books
with preview. Which means I finally went from "Nothing useful on the web
at all" about the FW-304A to finding an advertisement for it on page 23
of the fiber optics magazine 1987 handbook and buyer's guide. It's got
LID (analog LID, but still LID, circa 1987!) Whether LID will work at
all with my RBR fiber remains to be seen, as well as whether it works,
period.

Managed to find ads for the FW-303 and TD9950 as well - neither quite as
informative in terms of new info as the FW-304A ad, but that's partly
because those have a bit more info available elsewhere.

--
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Please don't feed the trolls. Killfile and ignore them so they will go away.

Re: Antiques are here (Orionics Splicers)
In article

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What's LID?

Re: Antiques are here (Orionics Splicers)

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Light (or Local) Injection and Detection - a way of measuring splice
loss (now more commonly estimated by camera systems looking at the
spliced fiber). The fiber beyond the splice region is bent, light is
injected through the side of the fiber at one bend, and detected at the
bend on the other side of the splice (rather than needing a light source
and power meter hooked up to the ends, or or OTDR hooked up to one end
of the fiber being spliced.)

More explanation and graphics at (scroll down a little):

http://www.thefoa.org/tech/ref/termination/fusion.html

or here (watch the wrap):

http://ccswebapps.corning.com/web/library/litindex.nsf /$all/EVO-773-EN/$f
ile/EVO-773-EN.pdf

I rather doubt it will work too well with Reduced Bend Radius fiber (at
least as implemented on a machine that long predates the invention of
RBR fiber) since it does not become so lossy at small bends as standard
fiber, but it's interesting to see it at this early point in splicer
development.

--
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Please don't feed the trolls. Killfile and ignore them so they will go away.

Re: Antiques are here (Orionics Splicers)
In article

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Thanks!  That's a really nice link.  

What impressed me most, watching the guy working with one of those
splicers on the tailgate of his pickup truck at the back of my lot a
few days, installing the fiber pigtail that will eventually bring
Google's Gb fiber into my house, wasn't actually the fusion splicer,
which I knew existed, and which looked just like those shown on the
web page.

It was the rough-and-ready character of the fiber strippers, with the
guy yanking the coating off the fiber as if it were just another piece
of #10 copper wire.  I know glass is supposed to have a lot of
strength -- I'm just not used to seeing it demonstrated in this way.

   --AES

Re: Antiques are here (Orionics Splicers)

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Google Gb makes me green with envy. We are stuck in the hinterlands of
fiber access - 20-30Mb down/1 up is as good as I can get here without
HUGE piles of money - 100Mb would be $7000/month on local loop costs
plus $900/month at the fiber hotel, last I checked. 40 days of that and
my annual budget would be gone...Way, way out of my league.  I couldn't
even get a number for gigabit.

We supposedly have a middle mile project coming in 2 years, but I don't
even know if that will really get last mile and provider costs down to
something reasonable here in practice (when they said they would connect
it to "schools and libraries" it turns out they only meant public ones.)
I have gigabit all over campus, but when it hits the edge (to/from the
rest of the world) it goes to molasses.

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Yes - it is a lot less delicate that you might think - in certain
orientations, and with the right tools. Try that with actual wire
strippers and you come to grief quickly. Most fiber strippers are the
same basic technology as wire strippers, just a lot more precise.

Push too hard sideways on the stripped fiber and it snaps quite readily.
What's actually surprising there is just how much difference even the
smallest 250um (OD) plastic coating makes on the 125 um (OD) glass in
terms of toughening up for handling. While you can easily break 250 um
coated fiber, IME you have to be deliberately trying or utterly
careless. It will even go a long way into a knot before suddenly
snapping. But bump the stripped end on a cabinet and it will happily
snap off (and send you looking for fiber scraps so you don't find them
in parts of your anatomy later.) I learned to leave stripping until just
before I put on connectors, after having started by pre-stripping a lot
of fibers the day before I finally gritted my teeth and epoxied on my
first batch of connectors.

--
Cats, coffee, chocolate...vices to live by
Please don't feed the trolls. Killfile and ignore them so they will go away.

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