How to find out mobile carrier's web-to-sms gateway address?

Is there anyway to find the e-mail to SMS gateway a mobile carrier
uses to route email as SMS messages? I am talking about any carrier: I
found some lists on the internet, but they don't cover all the countries.
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If I can send sms messages from a web interface my carrier provides
this means that this carrier has a gateway of the ones I am talking
about. I need a way to find these addresses regardless of the carrier
and the country.
Reply to
steven acer
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I wouldn't pay too much attention to lists like that. A lot of the entries are obviously wrong, networks that don't even offer service in the countries listed, and I did a few spot checks trying to send messages to my own mobile number in the UK, which didn't work.
Outside North America, SMS is caller pays, but there's no caller to charge for an e-mail gateway. That means that free gateways tend to be very limited, typically only available to a carrier's own customers.
If this project is urgent enough to be worth spending a small amount of money, Clickatell's paid SMS gateway works great. They offer a zillion ways to send messages, including their own email gateway (where messages have to include your account number and a password) and a nice HTTP POST interface that I use.
Regards, John Levine, snipped-for-privacy@iecc.com, Primary Perpetrator of "The Internet for Dummies", Information Superhighwayman wanna-be,
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ex-Mayor "More Wiener schnitzel, please", said Tom, revealingly.
Reply to
John Levine
Dummies",
well no it's not urgent, i am just doing it for the pleasure of hacking into the greedy carrier's own palace :D. If I am able to send sms from my carrier's web interfaced app. this should mean that it has a web to sms gateway. I just want a way to find its address or name.
Reply to
steven acer
And I'd particularly welcome such data for the Polish providers Idea, Plus, Era, and Orange. Even better would be the added information, which 3-digit cellular prefixes are proprietary to which of these various providers.
Thanks, and cheers, -- tlvp
Reply to
tlvp
Let me try and answer your questions.
Do you need to receive SMS? If you need to receive SMS, you will need to host your own GSM device or modem so that people can send you SMS.
If not, you can just use internet SMS gateways like clickatell to do the work, and post to them by HTTP, XML or email. The cost is about 6-8 cents per SMS. There are cheaper services, but not always reliable. If you need to host your own GSM device, you can use software like
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(GPL Open Source) or
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Regards.
Reply to
John
Thanks for the kannel and sms-gateway URLs, John: they're most welcome.
Here's the reason behind my query, though: my cellular service provider lets me send/receive (from/to my handset) up to 300 domestic SMS messages per month, free of charge, including outgoing "cellular email" messages, i.e., messages of the form
snipped-for-privacy@node.TLD # subject # body
... sent to the "gateway" phone number 500. But outgoing SMS to an international destination used to be 15 cents a pop, is going up soon to 25 or 30 cents.
If I knew the "node.TLD" component for the PLUS, ERA, IDEA, and ORANGE cellular providers in +48-land, I could send "cellular email" rather than "international SMS" messages, and save those few cents per message -- if I knew from the first three digits of the +48 cellphone number which of those Polish carriers was involved.
Until then, of course, 6 cents per SMS sent still beats 15 or 25 or 30 cents, so your info was most welcome; again, thanks.
Cheers, -- tlvp
Reply to
tlvp

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