Clock Rate command

If I issue a command such as
clock rate 128000
and this particular command is used on a T1 line, does this mean the
T1 line will transmit date at 128kbps instead of the full capacity of
1.5Mbps???
-DigiExistence
Reply to
DigiExistence
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I think - it means it won't work.
The clock rate comand is used mostly when you need to connect two routers with a cable and are not using a real T1.
Normally the Telco provides a clock signal (DCE side) which the router (DTE) locks on to when it is receiving or transmiting. If you don't have a telco you need to provide your own clock. You then get to choose the clock rate.
Reply to
Bod43
Use 1440 as a clock rate on a full T1 (1544) leaving 64K for circuit overhead.
peace t0
Reply to
t0
You don't use the "clock rate" command on T1 controller. Clock rate is used only on serial interfaces where the router is the DCE device. DCE devices derive the clock rate from the DTE. If you are connecting to a T1 via a CSU/DSU, then router will use a V.35 connection serial connection to the CSU in which case the CSU is the DCE and the router is the DTE. If you are connecting two routers back to back via a V.35 cables, one router would be the DTE and the other the DCE. You would configure the "clock rate" on the router that is the DCE. The role of the serial connection on the router is determined by the cable you use. Cisco serial cables are either a DTE cable or a DCE cable.
Scott
Reply to
Thrill5

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