Wireless Broadband router

Have a question or want to start a discussion? Post it! No Registration Necessary.  Now with pictures!

Threaded View


Can someone suggest a good fast Broadband wireless router, which is also a
cable modem? Does such a thing exist?

Can you get packs with PCI wireless cards for you PC too?


Many thanks
Gary




Re: Wireless Broadband router



Quoted text here. Click to load it

And why would you want such a thing? The cable modem goes out and then you
have nothing, because the router is combined with it. As opposed to both
being separate units and one unit goes down you can replace it.

Duane :)


Re: Wireless Broadband router


wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it


Agreed.  However, I have a different reason for making it seperate
packages.  

People move around.  You may end up with cable at one location, DSL at
another, wireless at a third.  The modem should be seperate to allow
such moves without throwing everything away and starting over.

The router should be seperate from the wireless for similar reasons.
Technology in wireless changes every few years.  You will eventually
see wireless devices (PDA's, laptops, Tivo, etc) with technology more
advanced than your existing wireless device.  You could upgrade with
just a wireless access point replacement, or you again might have to
toss the whole thing.  Routers and wireless devices also want to be in
different locations.  The CAT5 wires want the router to be near the
floor (usually under the desk) while the wireless wants to be as high
as possible for minimum obstructions and maximum range.  Seperate
boxes make it easier.  In addition, this gives you the ability to turn
off your wireless devices when you're not at home or at night to keep
the hackers to a minimum.

Note that you can use a wireless router as a wireless access point by
merely not connecting the WAN port and disabling the DHCP server.
Wireless routers are often cheaper than the equivalent wireless access
point.  It doesn't hurt to have an extra un-used feature.

PCI wireless cards are another problem.  The computah usually ends up
on the floor.  The antenna for the PCI wireless cards end up low to
the floor, sandwitched behind a big metal shield (the case), the wall,
and a mess of wires and cables.  I couldn't find a worse location for
an RF device if I tried.  Unless you're fairly close to the access
point, or fairly desperate, I don't think PC card wireless is a great
idea.  On the other hand, USB works well because you can reposition
the radio for best RF performance.

I can't suggest a specific router or PCI card as you haven't described
your requirements, computahs, or location.


--
Jeff Liebermann    jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D   http://www.LearnByDestroying.com">http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060    AE6KS  831-336-2558


Re: Wireless Broadband router



Quoted text here. Click to load it

Agreed ;-)

Duane :)


Re: Wireless Broadband router


All great points, in deed.

I can also concur that the most convienent place for my cable modem and
wireless router (802.11a/b) wasn't the best place for an AP.  Going the
other way, a wireless router (built-in AP) can also be used simply just a
router (with AP disabled) and then connected to a seperate AP.  I recently
ended up getting a seperate AP (802.11a/b/g) to do just this.  Well,
actually my intention was to use the new AP as a "repeater" (one of the
modes it can do) for the wireless router's built-in AP.  True, I could've
ran CAT5 between the router and new AP (at a better location), but whole
idea of using wireless equipment is to eliminate long cable runs. :^)

Unfortunetly, the new AP wasn't fully compatible (as an over-the-air
repeater) with the wireless router.  It wouldn't repeat the router's 802.11a
(54 MBS or 108 MBS) at all, and would only repeat the router's 802.11b (11
MBS).  I couldn't get 802.11b (22 MBS) to repeat.  Both are D-Link, which I
thought should be capable of working their "turbo modes" together.
Actually, what I think was preventing it from working as a repeater wasn't
the "turbo" but the "WDS functionality" of the new AP (which the router
doesn't have).  Router (DI-764) was from D-Link's "AirPro" (802.11a/b, turbo
capable) family while the new AP (DWL-7100AP) was from D-Link's "Air Premier
AG" family (802.11a/b/g, static/dynamic turbo and SuperG capable).  Plugging
the new AP directly into one of the router's LAN ports, it works great as an
AP.  To solve my initial problem, I ended up purchasing a second DWL-7100AP
and now use it as a repeater (repeating the DWL-7100AP now hooked up
directly to the router).  I now have a strong 802.11a/b (static/dynamic
capable) and 802.11g (SuperG and static/dynamic turbo capable) where I most
need it.  This ended up costing more than originally intended, but it also
added 802.11g into the loop, which I didn't have before.  It also freed up
the router's built-in AP, which I'm now using as an open (no encryption or
MAC filtering) "hot spot".  (I don't have my LAN accessible from the
router's AP, you can only get out on the internet. The DWL-7100AP's, which I
use for internet and LAN, are encrypted/filtered though.)  I just opened it
up the router AP so family/friends can easily use it with their
laptops/PDA's.  I consider the distance from the open SSID's to the street a
"security feature" against malicious outsiders anyway.  I could care less
about my neighbors using it to get on the internet, which (in fact) they
have (from their back porch) after I told them it was open if they ever want
to use it.  Openly sharing the internet should be one of the key things with
802.11, unfortunetly there are probably many no-life-having malicious
outsiders who think that open access translates into taking advantage of the
opportunity to do malice (i.e., trying to screw with someone's private LAN).
They probably have the mind set that doing such is to "teach the person a
lesson" and to "one up the person", but I look at it as they are a
no-life-having ahole.  I have my LAN protected, but I shouldn't have to
watch over internet acesss with clenched fists holding a shotgun.  In fact,
if a stranger uses my open internet from the sidewalk (signal is adequate
enough to connect there) for some simple web browing and emailing, I still
don't even care.  With these particular SSID's, I have included the text
"-OPEN" with their broadcast name -- stating that they are freely open.  My
philosphy is that I may be out in public and want to do same thing with
someone else's.   I think the adding the text "-OPEN" would be a great
convention for those with the same mind sets.  Note, however, that I am
logging everything going on with the open SSID's.  For the paranoid (but
still wanting to be open), a good idea would be to have an online printer
that automatically prints out new entries to the logs as they are added.  My
only "nightmare scenerio" would be someone using my open SSID's to send out
spam or to download child porn.  In my suburban neighborhood, I really doubt
this would be happen -- but, if it does, life will not be good for that
person.  I'd have zero tolerance for spam or child porn and wouldn't think
twice about pressing charges.  Adult porn, I could care less about --
athough if an outsider were to be download adult porn and my
girlfrield/fiance were to look at the logs, I'd have to explain MAC
addresses to her, "It wasn't me!".  LOL.  Anyway -- didn't mean to get off
on another subject.  :^)

Also, another great advantage of seperate modem, router, AP's, etc is that
you can also just disable portions of your network by simply turning the
stuff off.  As for router/AP built into computer, I'd hate that because that
would require that particular computer to always be powered in order to get
the network alive.   Whenever I have to leave for several days, I power down
my PC's, but the internet can still be accessed by friends/family.

Just some random cents to throw into the wind.

Cheers!






Re: Wireless Broadband router


Quoted text here. Click to load it

That was more than a cupile of cents. ;-)

Duane :)


Re: Wireless Broadband router




Quoted text here. Click to load it

My apologies.  Fingers got carried away.  I'll try to keep them under
control.   :^)




Re: Wireless Broadband router


Draytek Vigor 2900G is what you need, however this is an 'office class'
equipment and isn't cheap,
but it is reliable, unlike the cheap(er) consumer stuff.
You at least should consider the 2900VG, which has two VoIP ports, as
telephony is moving to the net already, it will be handy,
free calls available NOW.
I second the use of USB adaptors on a an end of a cable, e.g. Vigor 530.
Available from broadbandbuyer.co.uk and other online shops.
Regards,
Martin
Merely a satisfied customer, my Vigor 2600We hasn't missed a bit since
May2003.




Site Timeline