Apple Plans to Stream Children's Shows From Sesame Workshop [telecom]

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Apple Plans to Stream Children's Shows From Sesame Workshop

With 15 series underway, the tech giant moves closer to its streaming
future.  On Monday, one of its scripted shows is scheduled to start
filming.

Apple's slate of original programming will now have something for the kids.

In its first foray into children's programming, Apple announced on
Wednesday that it has ordered two shows - one live-action, the other
animated - from Sesame Workshop, the maker of "Sesame Street." In
addition, Apple has put a Sesame Workshop series centered on puppets
into development.

The announcement brought the number of series publicly confirmed by
Apple to 15. The company has said it will start streaming its
offerings next year, when it will begin competing in earnest against
Netflix, Amazon and Hulu.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/20/business/media/apple-streaming-children-sesame-workshop.html

Re: Apple Plans to Stream Children's Shows From Sesame Workshop [telecom]

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Dare I ask the question that ... with all these business deals,
just why is Sesame Workshop still holding onto tax exempt status?


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Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key
             dannyb@panix.com  
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Re: Apple Plans to Stream Children's Shows From Sesame Workshop [telecom]

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It's fairly easy to be a not-for-profit corporation: it's a matter of
structure, not line of business.  There are many non-profits which are
quite enormous businesses (the American Red Cross and many health
insurers, for example).  All non-profits must file an annual tax
return on IRS form 990, but providing they meet the structural
requirements, they are exempt from taxation.  This category includes
far more than just charities: there are labor unions, chambers of
commerce, certain kinds of mutual insurance companies, political
parties, political action committees, and so on.  (The principal
structural requirement is not having owners or beneficiaries who are
entitled to a share in the assets of the corporation should it be
dissolved.)

It's only somewhat more difficult to be a charity, which is what
allows *donors* to claim a tax deduction.  A charity has to have a
specific charitable purpose, but those can include providing health
care services, supporting the development of free software, or
operating nationwide religious radio networks.  Charities are somewhat
limited in how much they can directly earn from "unrelated business
activities", so a large charity -- like a university, for example --
may place some of its operations in a taxable subsidiary, and then
receive the profits as dividends after paying tax; this is treated as
an investment.

-GAWollman
(IANAL,TINLA)

--  
Garrett A. Wollman    | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
wollman@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future.  This is
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my employers.         | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)

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