CCNA Exam Sim Questions

I am preparing to write the CCNA 640-801 exam. I am wondering if anyone can
tell me approximately how many Sim Questions I can expect and, how well the
sims recognize command shortcuts (ex. sh instead of show). I am using the
selftest simulation exam and It only has 2 or three different simulation
questions and they are pretty basic. Setting password on vty and console
ports etc. Should I expect anything more elaborate on the real exam?
Thanks!
Reply to
The Dude
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the exam and I would expect them to be a lot harder than setting console/vty passwords. You maybe asked to configure various routing protocols, NAT/PAT etc etc
Cheers Dilan
Reply to
dilan.weerasinghe
Yes, the sim questions on the exam are much more complicated. They will not be solvable through simple memorization of command sequences. They were multi-part in my exam, and multiple steps were required to solve some parts. You fix A, to find out that B is also broken, and then fix B. (And debugging doesn't work)
Looking at the network will tell you more than the question will. The questions will be more along the lines of "its broke, fix it", and a console will be provided to one or multiple hosts.
You need to know how the protocols make decisions and pass updates (OSPF in particular), not just what commands are required to configure them.
Command shortcuts seemed to work fine. But advanced editing commands did not. ^a and esc-b were not functional for example. Though I believe filtering output with "incl" was functional.
I found the the exam questions on cisco.com/go/prepcenter to be most usefull.
-FWIW -Matt
Reply to
shrike
I have taken the exam twice and failed both. The first time I was thrown off by the interface and how it worked. The second time I took it I was more confident and I got through two of the simulations without a problem. However when I got to the third simulation I wasn't able to access one of the serial interfaces. I had twenty minutes to work on it but I could not get it to work. I feel that the simulations are key and you must pass them all. I was very confident as to the multiple choice and felt I didn't miss many of them but I didn't pass. The last simulation was the final question as well. I think that if I had done a "copy run start" and submitted the question with what changes I had made already I might have passed. But time ran out and I don't think the work I had already done was submitted.
Good Luck
Reply to
Frank
You can get between 2-3 simulation questions and they are definately much harder than setting passwords and so on. You will more than likely be a given a network that is not working correctly and be asked to configure it so that it does work. Each simulation takes about 20mins to complete and you effectively cannot pass the exam without getting these correct.
My advise is to take your time reading the question and, if need be, writing down the key pieces of information, rather than rushing into it.
If you take your time and work methodically you should be ok.
And remember to save your config after you make the changes. You will lose marks if you don't execute a copy run start and the question asks for your changes to be saved.
Frank wrote:
Reply to
dilan.weerasinghe
That's not true! At least, not with PIERCE AND VUE. You have to do each simulation in less than 5 minutes and blitz out the rest of the questions. The exam itself recommends that you do not spend more than 10 minutes per simulation!
On the other hand, the simulation is not setup to test your knowledge. It's a confusing interface set-up on purpose to fail you!
Thank you! It's funny to see that I wrote the same thing above. I am replying as I am reading.
Make sure to test the pen and paper they give you. It's very hard to take notes using that garbage! Ask for as many sheets as you can get. They will give you only one at a time.
The Dude
Reply to
The Dude

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