Application schematics which shown how to connect AP to the antenna to minimize loss!


I've prepared a small pdf which show how AP should be connected to the
antenna to avoid coaxial cable loss, with or without using a DC
injector to supply the amplifier (if needed).
The PDF document is available at the address
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, shown four
application schematics corresponding to the typical installations, and
refer to the WiFi ampilfier RAST2432, but can be generally exported to
any amplifier which can be supplied by coaxial cable using a DC
injector.
Bye. Paolo
Reply to
Mesfet
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"Due to its large power output, the RAST2432 can be used by licensed amateur radio only".
The large yagi antenna shown in the photo would certainly be illegal in the US with 1 watt output. The picture of the amplifier shows +26dBm output. Your data sheet says +30dBm. Looking at the board layout, it appears to have AGC on the input, but there are no specs as to the acceptable input range in order to calculate the maximum coax cable length. Also, no specs on tx/rx switching time. No FCC type certification number.
Incidentally, the file is two pages big but 430KBytes to download. That's because it appears to be a rather poor scanned image of each page, with no actual ASCII text. You might want to rework it into something more readable and smaller.
Reply to
Jeff Liebermann
Do you not have a restriction on the channels that can be used as I was under the impression that the 13m band terminated at 2.45GHz? NB. I am considering this from a UK/Eur perspective
Rob
Reply to
Rob
Snip.................................... It's a long time since I had anything to do with Amateur Radio so I had a quick browse.
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Reply to
Rob
Below is a snip from a John C. Dvorak PCMAG article regarding a wi-fi radio with a 1 watt radio.
"Pump Up the Power Dept.: If you're looking for an unusual wireless gateway router, check out the Bountiful Router from Bountiful WiFi out of Woods Cross, Utah (
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). I was most amused by the company press release, which goes on and on about this $600 device without ever mentioning its most interesting feature. Instead of the milliwatt radio found in most 802.11 gateway routers, this sucker has a full 1-watt radio. This is the legal limit allowed by the FCC for any radio running 802.11. And apparently there are all sorts of other requirements on top of this. As far as I can tell, it took a lot of work just to get this torch approved by the government. This has got to be a fun device for 802.11 hobbyists who want to experiment with antennas and long-distance 802.11."
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Jeff Liebermann wrote:
Reply to
DanR
Yep. $675 list price.
FCCID is TDK-BWR54G1 :
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'TDK-BWR54G1' Looking at the photos, the small circuit board appears to be the power amplifier, T/R switch, and RX RF amp. I can't tell for sure, but it appears that that one antenna is transmit, the other is receive. That might actually be a useful feature.
Reply to
Jeff Liebermann
Oh boy, here come the CB-style power wars.
Reply to
Neill Massello

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