Use a wireless router as a repeater for a laptop? - Page 2

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Re: Use a wireless router as a repeater for a laptop?

Quoted text here. Click to load it

yeah - you got it backwards.....
it's the Access Point that is sending the "broadcast"
which then can be "repeated".
not the other way around.

That's why it's best to just ask the simple question...
Which - you still have not really shared -
There are several different ways to "extend" the range to a WiFi Access  
Point.
or - even bypass the WiFi with other networking devices..



Re: Use a wireless router as a repeater for a laptop?
On Sun, 01 Dec 2013 14:56:37 -0800, Jon Danniken wrote:

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If I understand you correctly, I just did exactly what you want to do.
The "router" I used to connect to my laptop was a Ubiquiti NanoBridge M2.
It connected to a standard Netgear N600 home broadband router.

Here are the details that I had posted to a recent thread:

On Fri, 13 Dec 2013 01:48:52 +0000, Danny D'Amico wrote:

UPDATE:

After many hours of trying to get the settings just right, just now
I was able to tremendously extend the WiFi range of my laptop, as a test,  
simply by connecting a Ubiquiti NanoBridge M2 feedhorn (sans dish antenna)  
to the Ethernet port.
  
Here is my signal strength at the feedhorn, as seen through the laptop:
 http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2869/11399128184_ebab5e1de1_o.png

Notice the noise is a tiny at -99dBm while the signal strength is huge
at -44dBm (with a SNR of -44 - -99 = 55, if I did the math right).

This gets me 130Mbps between my Linux laptop & the home broadband router.

Here are the network settings that were necessary to make this work:
 http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2854/11399127954_02139418fd_o.png

And, here are the access-point specific wireless settings to make it
connect to my home broadband router's SSID:
 http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3733/11399100445_af45bef4c0_o.png

With the dish antenna, that Nanobridge M2 has a gain of 41dB (i.e.,  
23dBm transmit power + 18dBi antenna gain), which is far too powerful.

Since that calculates (if I did the math right?) to over 12 Watts, I  
had to lower the gain by removing the dish ... which dropped the gain  
down to 23dBm + 3dBi, or 26dB (which is a 0.4 Watts).

Even that was far too powerful for use in my house, so I dropped the  
transmit power of the feedhorn radio down to 6dBm, so with the 3dBi  
feedhorn-only gain, the screenshots above are at 6+3=9dB (0.008W) EIRP.

Even with the gain reduced as low as I could make it, I still got
a connection strength of -44dBm and a connect speed of 130Mbps, so,  
it's at least a proof of concept that this is one way to extend the  
WiFi range of your laptop.

My goal will be to try to connect to my home broadband router from a  
mile or two down the road... so that's what I'll try next.

PS: Jeff Liebermann should be proud of me!

Here's the howto I wrote up ... (it can also be used at coffee shops!)
BEGIN: How to use a Nanobridge M2 as your laptop wireless NIC!

0. I reset the Nanobridge M2 radio to default settings as per this video:
  
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0-h48wELJtw


   I connected the POE to the Nanobridge M2.
   I reset the Nanobridge M2 back to factory defaults by holding the reset button down for 10sec (until all LEDs flashed)

1. I set the Nanobridge M2 to be the Linux laptop wireless NIC as per this video:
  
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LIRHEwDOD5g


2. I turned off the wireless NIC inside the laptop with the hardware switch.
   Note: I could just as well have run this command on Ubuntu 13.10:
   $ sudo ifconfig wlan0 down  

3. I set the IP address of the laptop to be on the 192.168.1.XX subnet.
   $ sudo ifconfig eth0 192.168.1.99
   $ ifconfig (make sure eth0 is 192.168.1.something & that wlan0 is not up)

4. I physically connected the Nanobridge M2 to the eth0 port of the laptop.

5. I pinged the Nanobridge M2  
   $ ping 192.168.1.20
   PING 192.168.1.20 (192.168.1.20) 56(84) bytes of data.
   64 bytes from 192.168.1.20: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.572 ms
   64 bytes from 192.168.1.20: icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=0.460 ms
   64 bytes from 192.168.1.20: icmp_seq=3 ttl=64 time=0.286 ms
   etc. (control C to escape)

6. I logged into the Nanobridge M2
   $ netscape 192.168.1.20 (ubnt, ubnt)

7. I set the "Network" tab as follows:
   AirOS:Network
   Router (default is Bridge)
   WLAN Network Settings->DHCP (default is DHCP)
   LAN Network Settings->IP Address->192.168.10.20 (default is 192.168.1.1)
   [x]Enable NAT
   [x]Enable DHCP Server
   Range Start=192.168.10.100
   Range End  =192.168.10.200
   Change->Apply

8. I rebooted the Ubuntu PC (with the wlan0 card still turned off)

9. I set eth0 to be on the same (new) subnet as the Nanobridge M2:
   $ sudo ifconfig eth0 192.168.10.101

10. I pinged the radio:
    $ ping 192.168.10.1
    PING 192.168.10.1 (192.168.10.1) 56(84) bytes of data.
    64 bytes from 192.168.10.1: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=1.15 ms
    64 bytes from 192.168.10.1: icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=0.255 ms
    64 bytes from 192.168.10.1: icmp_seq=3 ttl=64 time=0.310 ms
    etc. (control + C to escape)

    $ ping 192.168.10.20
    PING 192.168.10.20 (192.168.10.20) 56(84) bytes of data.
    64 bytes from 192.168.10.20: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=1.71 ms
    64 bytes from 192.168.10.20: icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=0.308 ms
    64 bytes from 192.168.10.20: icmp_seq=3 ttl=64 time=0.242 ms
    etc. (control + C to escape)

11. I logged into the Nanobridge M2:
    $ netscape http://192.168.10.20 (ubnt, ubnt)

12. I set up the "Wireless" tab to connect to the home broadband router SSID:
    AirOS:Wireless
    SSID->Select (I sorted the signals by signal strength & encryption)
    I selected my WPA2-PSK encrypted network SSID.
    I scrolled to the bottom & hit select.
    Change->Apply

    Note: I also had to set the DNS server by turning off DNS proxy
          Primary DNS server = 8.8.8.8
          Secondary DNS server = 4.4.4.2

Voila!

Once I set up DNS (which wasn't described in the video), I was able to
connect to the Internet, and, in fact, am using this connection to type
this up to help myself (in the future) and others.

END OF: How to use a Nanobridge M2 as your laptop wireless NIC!


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