the lesser spotted Gigabit Ethernet port ?

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hi there

I am just wondering what the general view is of the astonishing number  
of wireless routers on the market (both xDSL and cable) which are  
offering wireless connections of hundreds of megabits, but have no wired  
connection faster than 100M.

I realise that most connections are directed toward the internet, and  
that that majority of customers have download speeds less than 100M so  
its not really a problem. However, for anybody using a media server or  
any other service on the LAN there's hardly any point in going wireless  
at all

There must be some rationale for this, apart from plain cost cutting -  
what is it ?

AT

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Re: the lesser spotted Gigabit Ethernet port ?
On 16/01/2019 18:33, Abandoned Trolley wrote:
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Apathy. Plus the belief of manufacturers that everybody uses wireless.  
I'm waiting for a router to come out with no Ethernet ports at all.


--  
Ria in Aberdeen

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Re: the lesser spotted Gigabit Ethernet port ?
On Wed, 16 Jan 2019 23:57:41 +0000, MissRiaElaine wrote:

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Has never bothered me. The router I use isn't even wireless. I use one  
wired connection into the main gigabit switches (with a firewall box in  
between, as it happens). I do have wireless APs hung off the gigfabit  
network. So the only thing that's on the 100Mb/s connection is the VDSL  
link - which is much slower than that.

Re: the lesser spotted Gigabit Ethernet port ?
On 17/01/2019 00:00, Bob Eager wrote:
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I have the Sky Q router for my sins, it's not the best by any stretch of  
the imagination, but it works. Only real drawbacks are no easy wall  
mounting fixings and only 2 Ethernet ports, but at least both are  
Gigabit. Only use one of them to link to the main switch in the rack  
anyway, and all I use wireless for is the occasional checking of email  
on the phone if there aren't any PC's switched on.


--  
Ria in Aberdeen

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Re: the lesser spotted Gigabit Ethernet port ?
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They're already making laptops without them: you have to buy an add-on  
USB-Ethernet port if you want one, just as you have to buy an add-on  
CD/DVD/BluRay drive if you want one.  


Re: the lesser spotted Gigabit Ethernet port ?
On 17/01/2019 09:15, NY wrote:

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It's sad to hear that, but I'm not surprised.


--  
Ria in Aberdeen

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Re: the lesser spotted Gigabit Ethernet port ?
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All three FTTC routers I've tried (a D-Link, a TP-Link and a Draytek)
recently have had four Gigabit ports, though my old Draytek 2820n has
only one Gigabit port and three 100Mb/s.  I think *modern* routers do
now tend to have all Gigabit.

--  
Chris Green


Re: the lesser spotted Gigabit Ethernet port ?
On 17/01/2019 09:14, Chris Green wrote:
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Given that Gigabit cabling and switches and PCs with Gigabit ports have  
all been widely and cheaply available for over a decade, I think it's  
reprehensible.  But you can only vote with your wallet  -  just don't  
buy kit with only Fast Ethernet capability.

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Agreed.  The moment you start backing up PC OS image files or media  
files over your LAN, Gigabit comes into its own.  As it happens I've had  
to revert temporarily to having my servers connected to the rest of the  
LAN via WiFi, and even though it's 802.11n accessing them is treacle slow.

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Yes.


Why?  Even though you may only normally use WiFi, sometimes unforeseen  
circumstances can make a faster cabled connection incredibly useful.

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Yes, same here  -  Cisco WAG320n and DrayTek 2830n.

Re: the lesser spotted Gigabit Ethernet port ?
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I didn't read that as "I'm hoping for a router with no Ethernet ports",
but rather as "I anticipate it's only a matter of time before routers
with no Ethernet ports come on the market."

Cheers
Tony
--  
Tony Mountifield
Work: tony@softins.co.uk - http://www.softins.co.uk
Play: tony@mountifield.org - http://tony.mountifield.org

Re: the lesser spotted Gigabit Ethernet port ?
On 17/01/2019 11:06, Tony Mountifield wrote:
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its a joke

Re: the lesser spotted Gigabit Ethernet port ?
On 16/01/2019 23:57, MissRiaElaine wrote:
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Already happened. Google IIRC.

Re: the lesser spotted Gigabit Ethernet port ?
On 22/01/2019 13:49, Chris Bartram wrote:
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TP-LINK TL-WR902AC

Re: the lesser spotted Gigabit Ethernet port ?
On Tue 22/01/2019 14:39, Tony van der Hoff wrote:
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That's because the original design of that unit is to provide a wireless  
access point on the end of a cable, to provide wireless to something  
that does not have the capability, or as a wireless repeater.

Consequently  it DOES have an RJ45 - I've got two of 'em!

--  
Woody

harrogate three at ntlworld dot com

Re: the lesser spotted Gigabit Ethernet port ?
On 1/22/19 6:39 AM, Tony van der Hoff wrote:

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No... That has an ethernet port...

Re: the lesser spotted Gigabit Ethernet port ?
Johann Beretta wrote:
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yeah ... a 100M Ethernet port - in spite of the "Combined
simultaneous wireless speeds of up to 733Mbps
on the 2.4GHz and 5GHz bands" quoted in the manufacturers spec sheet.

Maybe that was the whole point of the thread ?

Fred

Re: the lesser spotted Gigabit Ethernet port ?
On 1/23/19 3:08 PM, Frederick Smith wrote:

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It was the point of the thread, but not the statement I was replying to.  
The GP said "I'm waiting for a router with no ethernet ports" Then  
someone cited the TPLink.. Which has an ethernet port...

Nevertheless, having a wireless router with a 100mbit port versus a  
1000mbit doesn't mean you can't transfer data at 1000mbps.. It just  
means that you can only transfer at that speed to another wireless device.




Re: the lesser spotted Gigabit Ethernet port ?
Johann Beretta wrote:
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Who is the GP ?



Re: the lesser spotted Gigabit Ethernet port ?
On Sat 26/01/2019 22:35, Frederick Smith wrote:
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Eh? You are confusing wireless and wired. A wired port running at 100Mb  
will connect to a wired port running at 1000Mb bit the data will only  
flow at the rate of the lowest speed port in use, in this instance it  
has NOTHING to do with wi-fi.

Agreed there are wireless routers that can achieve wireless speeds well  
above 100Mb (usually in the 5GHz radio band) but I don't know of any  
capable of 1000Mb. Indeed even routers with radio rated over 100Mb will  
be seriously limited by other factors such as signal strength, signal  
quality, and the rate at which the rest of system can handle the data flow.


--  
Woody

harrogate three at ntlworld dot com

Re: the lesser spotted Gigabit Ethernet port ?
On 1/27/19 12:22 AM, Woody wrote:
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I'm not confusing anything.  If you have a 1gbps wireless router with a  
100MB ethernet port, you can d/l stuff from the internet/wired lan at  
100mbps.  No faster..

But.. you can transfer data to another wireless device at 1gbps IF your  
devices can operate that fast.

My point was that a router with a 100mbit port isn't "strictly" limited  
to 100mbps.   Two wifi laptops, connected to a 1gbit wireless router can  
communicate with each other significantly faster than 100mbps, assuming  
you don't have client isolation enabled. i.e. the wired port never comes  
into play.

And yeah, I know that signal strength is a factor.

As for wireless routers that will achieve 1gbps, there are plenty..  
Granted, not your typical home setup, but a MikroTik 60GHz radio link  
will achieve that speed (of course it also has a gigabit port).  Mimosa  
B24s (24 GHz) will also clock in at 1gbps. Ubiquiti's AirFiber 5X uses  
multiple transmitters out of the same dish at 45 degree polarized angles  
to hit nearly 2GBPS when using 4 radios. (technically not a single  
router, but 5GHz radio waves can't physically carry 2gbit/s, hence the  
workaround.  I'd classify all of these as consumer radios due to the low  
cost ($700/ea for the Mimosas, $300/each for the MikroTiks, and about  
$1,100/each for a fully loaded AirFiber 5X) which certainly puts them in  
the hands of pros and hobbyists alike.


Re: the lesser spotted Gigabit Ethernet port ?
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Is it strictly true that a 1 Gbps wireless router can transfer data  
wirelessly from PC 1 to PC 2 at that speed? Even assuming that there is no  
other wireless traffic, doesn't the fact that the router is having to handle  
two data streams (PC1 to router, router to PC2) reduce the data rate - maybe  
to half the theoretical maximum.

I have found that my router, which advertises speeds of up to 400 Mbps,  
rarely achieves a link speed to a computer of more than about 80 Mbps (*),  
and the actual data throughput (time to copy file of known size to/from an  
SMB share) is dramatically less. Copy laptop (Ethernet or wireless) to  
desktop (Ethernet) achieves close to 100 Mbps for Ethernet for both legs,  
but about 50 Mbps if the laptop is connected by wifi. That's for hard discs  
which can achieve much higher disc to disc transfer rates, so that isn't a  
rate-limiting step.

For accessing the internet, this doesn't matter because the WAN (ADSL/VDSL)  
connection is the rate-limiting step, but for internal PC-to-PC LAN  
connections, it becomes important. If I want to access or copy a large file  
(eg a .TS video file) on my laptop, I always plug it into Ethernet because I  
get a dramatically better transfer speed. That has been the case for several  
laptops and for several routers over the years, so it's not just one dodgy  
laptop's or router's wifi adaptor.



(*) This is for a situation where there are no other wifi networks in range  
and the laptop is within a few feet of the router.  


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