Router Discrimination

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How does an internet company slow one users data feed while letting another  
user on the same router account faster speeds? They have sophisticated  
methods of determining exact location of signal/antenna to do this, if I am  
not mistaken. These ISPs play with your connection

Re: Router Discrimination
On 6/20/19 12:33 PM, hohum wrote:
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There are multiple ways.

Things like DSL modems actually have different line speeds that you can  
select between when subscribing to the service.

Things like cable modems combine different channels and different  
numbers of channels to make different aggregate bandwidth.  The system  
controlling a CMTS node tells cable modems what channels they can use  
when.  They simply tell your modem to use fewer channels if you  
subscribe to a lower speed.

It's possible to rate limit people on the router without any knowledge  
of the connection technology.  This is done by keeping a counter of how  
much traffic each IP address has sent in the last second / minute / hour  
/ day / week / month, and use that counter to decide if the next packet  
to or from that IP should be allowed through.  If you're under your  
speed limit, the packet goes through.  If you're at or over your speed  
limit, the packet doesn't go through (yet).

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They don't need to know where your signal is.  They likely want to not  
deal with that.  They only care about where to send the monthly bill to.

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Maybe.  Maybe not.  Maybe not in the way that you're thinking.



--  
Grant. . . .
unix || die

Re: Router Discrimination
On 6/20/19 11:33 AM, hohum wrote:
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A router you own or a router they own? If the latter, you could tailor  
it based on MAC address.

But, nobody is doing this. Nobody is making your connection slower than  
your wife/roomate/whatever's connection.

I'm always amused when some person thinks they're so special that the  
employee of some ISP is going to risk prison just to fuck with them a  
little bit.

It's FAAAAAR more likely that your two devices have different  
capabilities.  Take WiFi for example.. In the very early days of WiFi,  
we had the 802.11b specification. That spec afforded a maximum speed of  
11 megabits per second over a "WiFi" connection.

Any device that was manufactured during that time, can only do 11  
megabits per second over a wifi connection even today. And, that's only  
if your fancy new router has the capability to make fall back  
connections to old protocols, in the first place.

If your router will talk to it it doesn't matter one shit that you have  
a gigabit connection. Your device is going to communicate at 11mbps  
period.  Any devices manufactured during the 802.11a/g eras will be able  
to chat at 54mbps.  And so on and so forth.

It's also quite possible that you'll get worse speeds if your standing  
on the other side of a wall that is packed with foil-backed insulation.  
You might also be standing more closely to your neighbor's router that  
is broadcasting on the same damn channel. Maybe your device has a signal  
level of -70dbi and a noise floor of -80dbi.  You aren't gonna get  
awesome speeds out of a SNR (signal to noise ratio) of -10dbi.

You take two brand new iPhones, connect them to the same router, and  
then stick one on the other side of metal foil backed insulation and you  
sure-as-shit aren't gonna see the same download speeds.  Same goes for  
two iPhones with different signal qualities.  The one seeing the router  
at -50dbi is going to get vastly better speeds than one that sees it at  
-75dbi.


Re: Router Discrimination

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I am on a wireless connection so anything is possible, but I have seen  
them firewalling blocking my access to NNTP servers,where it is obvious  
the data is being immediately blocked by firewall rule somewhere. They  
frequently stall my connection right at the time a critical data transfer  
is to be made or hijack my DNS lookups.  When I change my MAC address I  
get the connection back. I have run multiple AV scans both online and off  
using the top rated av scanners and I find nothing, but it's possible I  
could be trojaned by corrupt OS files. I have not had these problems with  
other ISPs, only Globe Philippines. The router is very flaky and pings to  
public DNS servers are up one minute and down the next.  

Would running a IDS program help trace the cause of these interferences?  
Snort or other?

Re: Router Discrimination
On 6/20/19 10:05 PM, hohum wrote:
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Is this internet you pay for? Or are you "borrowing" someone else's  
connection?

Why would your ISP (assuming you are paying one) turn around and fuck  
with the connection they are selling you? To what end?

Re: Router Discrimination

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Comcast used to send TCP resets when they saw something they didn't like. There was publicity and
they stopped. Sample link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TCP_reset_attack#Comcast_Controversy

As recently as a month ago, I helped troubleshoot a situation on Cable One in Mississippi where
connections were being reset after a significant amount of data usage between the local user and a
single remote endpoint. Using tcpdump and Wireshark, we could see the TCP resets, but it wasn't
until we did a test where we controlled both ends of the connection that we could see TCP resets
arriving at both the source and the destination simultaneously, each looking like it was issued by
the other end. In some of their literature, Cable One mentions something called 'active network
management', so we figure that's where the resets were coming from. Talking with Tier 2 support, he
confirmed that while there is no overall data cap (at this particular service tier), there *is* a
cap on usage to/from a single endpoint. Explaining that these large file transfers were work
related, he showed no sympathy so the customer switched to at&t UVerse. So far, so good. Higher
speeds, (390/390 versus 300/25), nearly the same monthly cost ($60 versus $55), but it's at&t so
it's probably no one's first choice.



Re: Router Discrimination

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I pay for it, it's my landlords connection and she knows it.

Re: Router Discrimination

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I am either being hacked by the ISP or someone on the network.

Lately I have had to change the mac address AND the user account to get  
back ability to ping the router reliably.

Very funny that changing the user account reestablishes my connectivity  
even after I have changed the mac address.

The globe routers have NEVER been any good. Have no idea why their  
system is so screwed up. I will have to go to DSL cable and do a hard  
reset of the router, but I am not sure I will not have problems with  
resetting all the parameters in the router. I hate to have to call these  
jackasses to come help me.

Really sucky ISP, everyone hates it and the online reviews are  
atrocious.


Re: Router Discrimination
wrote:

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Right.  The first step to solving a problem is to blame someone.

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I'm dealing with a similar problem that I can't seem to fix.  It's an
Arris SB-6141 cable modem and an Asus RT-AC66Uv1 router.  There are
about 6 assorted Thinkpad/Lenovo laptops all connected via Wi-Fi. Some
new, some old.  Only the Thinkpad/Lenovo laptops running Windoze 10
all have the same problem.  If the Comcast or the modem loses internet
connectivity, the Wi-Fi will disconnect, and remain disconnected even
if connectivity is restored to the modem.  Wi-Fi connectivity can be
temporarily restored by changing the MAC address or rebooting the
laptop or router.  ipconfig release/renew doesn't restore wi-fi
connectivity.  Running "network reset" and playing with various power
saving settings do not help.  Temporarily switching to a different
router doesn't fix the problem.  No problems with other machines
running Windoze 7, XP, Android, ChromeOS, etc.  My initial guess(tm)
is either a Windoze 10 problem, or a bad Wi-Fi driver.  I'll post
something when I visit the site in about 2 weeks.



--  
Jeff Liebermann     jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann     AE6KS    831-336-2558

Re: Router Discrimination

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get  
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connectivity  
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forgot to mention I am running win7 not 10

Re: Router Discrimination
wrote:

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So much for that great idea.  The customer with the aformentioned
problem has several Win 7 machines.  Only the Win 10 machines drop the
wi-fi connection when the cable modem drops the internet connection.
The Win 7 machines continue to work normally when the cable modem
reconnects.

--  
Jeff Liebermann     jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann     AE6KS    831-336-2558

Re: Router Discrimination
wrote:

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Problem solved and the problem had nothing to do with Windoze 10  
or a bad Wi-Fi driver.  So much for my initial guess(tm).

I did a Comcast internet service call Saturday that was rather
unusual.  I've been working on this customers computers for
probably 15 years, ever since he moved to Bonny Doon.  His Comcast
internet had always been unreliable and subject to erratic short
term outages.  Comcast has looked at his problem many times.
There were visits by installers, but since the cabling was installed
quite nicely, nothing was changed.  Last time I was there (about
6 months ago), I found an intermittent F connector, which I replaced.
In the last few weeks, the erratic outages became more frequent to
the point where the customer was sufficiently desperate to have me
work on it on a weekend and in rather hot weather.

I spent 4 hrs systematically replacing everything possible to see
what happens.  The SB6141 was upgraded to an SB6183, which
improved the download speed to about 75 Mbits/sec, but didn't do
anything for the erratic drop outs.  I was down to my laptop
plugged directly into the SB6183 and it still screwed up.  The
Rigol DSA815 spectrum analyzer showed nothing unusual and the
SNR and signal levels in the modem diagnostics were well with
acceptable limits.  Nothing interesting in the modem logs.  Yet,
every 5 to 20 minutes, the error rate dramatically increased,  
stayed there for about 5 minutes, and then returned to normal.
Several times, I thought I had fix it, only to have it crap out
by simply waiting a few minutes.  Maximum frustration for me.

A quick check of the neighbors showed that none were having any
manner of similar problems with their Comcast internet.  So, the
problem was somewhere on the customers property or in his  
equipment or computahs.

I was about to give up when I looked more carefully at what was
inside the cable box.  The cable entered the box via some F barrel
connectors, and then went to a -6dB tap.  It continued through
the tap via RG-6/u which eventually went to the TV and the rest
of the house.  I had that branch of the cable disconnected and
replaced with a 75 ohm termination, so I knew it wasn't in that
part of the house cabling.  Connected to the -6dB tap was a
-8dB attenuator which continued to about 20ft of RG6/u coax to
the cable modem.

It was at this point that I was getting desperate.  Despite the
good readings on both the modem and spectrum analyzer, something
didn't seem right with this arrangement.  I had never seen that
much attenuation in front of a cable modem.  -6dB was about right
for the tap, but the -8dB attenuator was far too much attenuation.
I removed the attenuator from the system, and immediately things
started to look much better.

The first thing I noticed was that all the download speed tests
had stabilized to a solid 90 Mbit/sec, which indicated that it
could go much faster, but was being rate limited either at the  
CMTS or my 100baseT ethernet cable.  We tested it every way I  
could think of and the dropouts seemed to be gone.  The mysterious
wi-fi disconnects also disappeared.  So, the extra attenuator  
that had been in the system for at least 10 years was the  
apparent culprit.

Of course, not everything went perfectly.  I forgot to take photos.
I forgot to close the lid on my fishing box full of coax connectors
and dumped half the contents on the ground.  Dinner at a local
restaurant was awful.  It was much too hot and I was dead tired.

Unfortunately, two questions remain un-answered for the now.  Why
was the modem signal levels and SNR normal, when it was obviously
having a difficult time dealing with the low signal levels?  That's
4 different modems that I tested (3ea SB6141 and 1ea SB6183).  There
were some errors appearing in the statistics pages, but nothing
unusual.  After removing the attenuator from the system, the SB6183
still showed some errors, but not as many as with the attenuator.
I need to take a closer look at the numbers and the effects of
excessive attenuation in front of the cable modem.  Also, why did
excessive packet loss and errors cause only the Lenovo Win 10 wi-fi
driver to disconnect and not automatically reconnect?  Yet another
project.



--  
Jeff Liebermann     jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann     AE6KS    831-336-2558

Re: Router Discrimination
On 6/20/19 10:05 PM, hohum wrote:
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And uh, an IDS won't tell you shit if the blockage is external to your  
computer. In IDS, the I is key. I=Intrusion. A blockage is not internal  
and it's not an intrusion.

How is it obvious you are being blocked by a firewall rule? Is it  
possible that the source of your internet is simply a shitty ISP with an  
unreliable connection itself?

Is it possible that changing your MAC address causes your connection to  
reset? (it's actually more than possible, it's mandatory) Resetting your  
connection may be what is resulting in it working again. It's entirely  
possible you have a flaky wifi chip.  I had one go out on my HP laptop.  
My connection became increasingly unreliable until one day it failed all  
together. Once I replaced the wifi assembly, I never had a problem again.

Re: Router Discrimination

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I already tried resetting without changing mac, it does not work.

Lately When I exit sleep mode on the laptop, and previously had  
disconnected the connection to the ISP, I see the connection as been made  
immediately after I exit sleep mode. Can they download data when the  
computer is at sleep and the connection has been terminated? Did not  
think that was possible. Lately I have resorted to d/c the cable so it's  
impossible to activate a connection while the computer is at sleep.

The way I know it's a firewall block is because firewall blocks act  
IMMEDIATELY. You can tell that the blockage is immediate/fast, indicates  
a firewall block by ruleset.

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