Networking

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What is the difference in ad-hoc, infra-strustrue

and wich one is best for over all coverage?

Sincerely
Chris



Re: Networking


@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com:

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Ad-Hoc allows two wireless NIC(s) to share resources between machine like
ICS and File & Printer Sharing. While infra-structure allows for the
connection to a wireless router and ICS with the router and File & Print
Sharing.

Duane :)


Re: Networking


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Ad-Hoc allows two clients to connect in a point to point link.

Typically a "managed" network has one, or more with WDS
repeaters, Access Points to which *multiple* clients can
connect.

Whether the clients can then communicate with each other or with
any other services on the network is a matter of configuration.

--
Floyd L. Davidson           <http://web.newsguy.com/floyd_davidson
Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska)                         floyd@barrow.com

Re: Networking


Is it like with ad-hoc everybody talks to everybody and infra-structure,
everbody has to go back to the ap's??


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Re: Networking



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Exactly.  In infrastructure mode, all connections go between the
clients and the central access point.  If you wanna copy a file
between two clients, the data has to go through the access point.


--
# Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
# 831.336.2558 voice  http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
#                         jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
#                           jeffl@cruzio.com     AE6KS

Re: Networking


Thank You , that is the way I like my questions answered.

how about another..

If your system is setup as infrastructure does everybody go back to the AP
to get to the Internet or can they go thru the closest / best connected
computer to get to the internet. or do they all //always have to go to the
AP to get out of the building.


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Re: Networking



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Everything goes through the access point in infrastructure.  The
wireless clients don't even know other clients are there.  I think it
would be helpful if you disclose what you are trying to accomplish and
what you have to work with.  If it's to extend your in-house network
to other locations, there are security and performance complications
which require knowing these things.

Incidentally, some wireless routers (WRT54G) have a "client
protection" or misnamed "access point protection" feature, where the
clients can't even communicate with each other, while are still able
to access the internet through the access point.  The idea is to
prevent the spread of worms and viruses.

What you're describing is a "mesh network".  No access point.  Each
client is effectively acting in ad-hoc mode, and can pass store and
forward packets to the next node.  Eventually, it will make it to node
that has an internet connection.  The obvious benifits of this is
improved coverage without a mess of access points and expensive
backbone bandwidth.  I have a pile of not-so-nice things to say about
the efficiency of such mesh systems.  That will take too long to
explain.

There are also hybrids.  WDS (wireless distribution service) offers
both the features of an access point (i.e. connectivity to internet)
as well as store and forward bridging, in one box.  The WDS access
point can act as both an infrastructure bridge, and a store and
forward repeater at the same time.  You can also plug a PC into the
ethernet port and effectively use it as a client radio.  The down side
is that it has many of my complains about the efficiency of mesh
networks with the added bonus of proprietary implimentations.
Basically, you have to have all one brand of chipset or it will not
work.


--
Jeff Liebermann    jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D   http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060    AE6KS  831-336-2558

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