how to see all pc's on my wireless

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Hi I think someone is using my wireless connection that I have only had for
2 weeks I set it up as in the cd and manual but now im upto 25gig out of
50gig is there a way to see who is using my connection by wireless? I have
setup a wap key and I know it is needed to connect to my modum as I tried it
with my laptop but I cant see how I downloaded so much in just 2 weeks.

I have an edimax ar (xxxxxxxxxx) type though I dont know if its safe to
include the whole model name to the internet.

GK



Re: how to see all pc's on my wireless
wrote:

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<http://home.comcast.net/~jay.deboer/airsnare/
--
Jeff Liebermann     jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann     AE6KS    831-336-2558

Re: how to see all pc's on my wireless
wrote:

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Hey "Miso".  If you have questions or comments, please send them from
a working email address.  Thanks.


--
Jeff Liebermann     jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann     AE6KS    831-336-2558

Re: how to see all pc's on my wireless
On 9/3/2012 8:34 AM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
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Freaking Thunderbird. I could of sworn reply went to the group. I see
how you need to hit "followup". This was a working email addesss at one
time. I sometimes use it from google groups on machines where I don't
have a mail client installed.

My comment was airsnare sounds no more secure than mac filtering.


Re: how to see all pc's on my wireless

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Yeah, yeah, yeah.  Switch to Forte Agent.

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Here's your comment:

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Right.  However, Airsnare detects any unauthorized MAC address.  If
someone spoofs a normal user, than it won't sound the alarm.  However,
if someone just randomly starts changing their MAC address, it will
alert the owner that someone's trying to break in.

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It's called "AP Isolation".  An intruder can only get to the internet
and not to any of the PC's on the LAN.

--
Jeff Liebermann     jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann     AE6KS    831-336-2558

Re: how to see all pc's on my wireless
On 9/3/2012 2:40 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
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The AP isolation as I read it keeps wireless clients from sniffing other
wireless clients. To keep the wireless client off your system, you need
to "unbridge" it. I haven't got that part working. It looks more
complicated than the menu would indicate. Reading the DD-WRT manual, you
need to set up a virtual access point. This is on my list.

Back to airsnare, you could get the MAC address via kismet, so no change
of MAC would be detected. But kismet has a feature where it can detect
spoofing by seeing the same MAC have different signal levels within a
given period of time. The idea being a MAC in your house and the same
MAC by an outside intruder. Even then the intruder could crank up the
juice to match your signal.

I think keeping the wireless units off of your wired lan is the best
bet. If you need to transfer data, just use a thumb drive or temporarily
hook up the devices on the wired router.


Re: how to see all pc's on my wireless
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Your router will probably have a page that lists current connections. You
/do/ have anti-virus installed AND uptodate, don't you...?

Chris

Re: how to see all pc's on my wireless
Yes I have AV and all updates I used the settings away from the cd and made
it so there can be only one wifi connection and the SSID is now invisable
with a new key. What is the advantages of using WPA and WPA2 - WPA2 on mine
has WPA2-PSK and WPA2-Enterprise which one should I use, I only use the WiFi
for my Playstation 3 and I am about to buy a Playstation Vita so I will bump
up the max WiFi connections to 2. I hear that using a switch is good but I
have no understanding of them would I have to plug my ethernet cable into
the PC and then to the switch and the switch into my wireless modum? Will
the switch work for the wireless too? I have a button on my modum/wireless
to enable WPS but im using a key and I dont think the PS3 has WPS enabled or
avaliable, should I continue using the key or try to get the WPS working?

wow many questions, thanks all

GK


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Re: how to see all pc's on my wireless
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No point making the SSID invisible. It's still discoverable (but harder)
and just irritates other people around you trying to find a clear
channel.


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WPA2-PSK is good for a home-based setup.


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The switch is like an outlet multiplier for your mains electricity, but
it's for networking. Typically a home/consumer-grade switch will have four
(or maybe eight) ports on it. Each port is directly equivalent to any
other - you can imagine that there's a set of wires connecting port
to evry other. You plug one device into each port - including the AP
and Router.


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If you don't think the PS3 will work with WPS, don't use WPS. Continue
using the key. (WPS is for people who can't/won't enter a key.)

Chris

Re: how to see all pc's on my wireless
On 9/4/2012 5:53 AM, Chris Davies wrote:
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I recall WPS is compromised, i.e. it can be hacked.

I didn't quite follow if a switch was being added to a router or not. By
some magic, at least with this Dlink I have, you can put the switch on
the router and the DHCP knows how to assign IP address to what is on the
switch. What you do have to keep in mind is that one port on the router
is now shared with all the clients on the switch, so the bandwidth could
be reduced to those clients if they are all busy. If you had a device
that you wanted to have minimal ping time or the best streaming, you
would use a port on the router.


Re: how to see all pc's on my wireless
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The switch is an un-necessary confusion in your description. When a
device (your PC, your mobile phone, Wii, whatever) wants an IP address it
shouts across the wire (or wireless) for one. In your case the Router is
responsible for allocating these IP addresses so it gives one out. The
switch itself will not have an IP address and will not know anything
about IP addresses.

Like I said last time (or tried to say), consider it simply as a device
for plugging cables together.

    Router ----[        ]
    AP --------[        ]
    Device 1 --[ SWITCH ]
    Device 2 --[        ]
    Device 3 --[        ]


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Technically true, but unless you're maxing out 100Mbit ethernet you're
unlikely to see this as a problem.


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best streaming, you would use a port on the router.

Er, no, not really. See above.
Chris

Re: how to see all pc's on my wireless
On 9/4/2012 2:46 PM, Chris Davies wrote:
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The switch must have some measurable latency and certainly an effect on
BW if the clients on the switch are busy. So I stand by that statement
unless you can explain otherwise.


Re: how to see all pc's on my wireless

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While it wouldn't be hard to set up a theoretical test case that
supports the argument of the single-port bottleneck, I think it would
be unusual to see it in practice. It depends on things like a real
definition for "busy", and careful consideration of the two endpoints
of this so-called 'busy' conversation. BW considerations, where one
endpoint is on the Internet, must also take into account the fact that
most of us don't have a 100 Mbps (let alone 1000 Mbps) Internet WAN
connection, so the test would have to be heavily favored toward LAN
traffic, and would also have to be engineered in such a way as to
saturate the link between the switches, rather than exist as
intraswitch traffic on either switch A or switch B.


Re: how to see all pc's on my wireless
On Tue, 04 Sep 2012 22:46:34 +0100, Chris Davies


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I've run tests to see what a cheap ethernet switch can handle.  The
common problem is that two ports are occupied by a high bandwidth
application, such as running a backup or massive file copies, while
users on the other ports are trying to surf the web.  The basic setup
requires 4 computers and at least a 4 port switch.  I run iPerf or
preferably jPerf between two computers on two pairs of ports.  

I don't have numbers handy, but I'll do this from memory.  The
performance really varied with different switches and routers,
especially at gigabit speeds.  At 100baseT-FDX (full duplex), the
average router would deliver 80Mbits/sec on a single pair of ports and
75Mbits/sec on two pairs of ports.  My guess is these are crossbar
type ethernet switches.

However, I found a few ancient bus type ethernet 5 port switches
(Dlink something) that split the bandwidth in half when run on two
pairs of ports.  That sucks but fortunately is not very common.

Things got really messy with gigabit.  With a typical 5 port 1000baseT
switch, I could usually get about 800Mbits/sec thruput for a single
pair of ports, but only after considerable optimization (tweaking) of
packet sizes, window sizes, and such.  (The stock Windoze XP system
barely delivered 300Mbits/sec).  However, when I ran two pairs of
ports, the results were all over the map.  Some switches cut the
bandwidth in half, others only dropped a little.  A rather expensive
16 port gigabit switch (Linksys something) did great.  Hardly any
slowdown.  The gigabit switch inside a Netgear N600 router cut
throughput by more than half.

Adding an external gigabit switch to the router makes things worse.
With two pairs of streams running through one port on the external
switch and through the switch on the router, it's going to bottleneck
at half the speed of each stream.  The simple solution is to buy an
external switch which has enough ports to handle all the wired
connections, and run exactly one cable to the wireless router, which
is unlikely to run at gigabit rates.

--
Jeff Liebermann     jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann     AE6KS    831-336-2558

Re: how to see all pc's on my wireless
.Conversely, couldn't you put the clients that you want to have
bandwidth on the wifi/router, saving one port from the wifi/router
feeding the switch, then put printers and nodes where you don't care
about speed on that switch.

I will admit your solution is simpler, but 8 port switches are about all
you can find for cheap, so the extra ethernet ports on the wifi/router
will be needed.

Say you have 4 ports on the wifi router and 8 ports on the switch, Just
hooking them together means you have 3 + 7 ports available. I have a lot
of thin clients that really don't need the speed, so putting them on the
switch makes sense for my case.

If all the clients were as demanding, then putting them all on the
switch makes a lot of sense. If you have a few thin clients that aren't
speedy, doesn't it make more sense to take the slow pokes, put them on a
switch, and then create a higher bandwidth stream by summing them all
together, and have that feed off the wifi/router.


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