How to list all devices on the Windows or Linux home network

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How does my Android phone figure out what's on my network
without logging into the home router?

I can see 8 devices on the network when I log into the admin account  
of the router using a web browser on a laptop.

However, I can see all those devices from my Android phone WITHOUT
logging into the router, simply by using "Fing" Android freeware:
 https://i.imgur.com/Szjbr5f.gif

My question?

How does the phone see both wired & wireless devices (such as a  
wired printer & a wired Ooma) without logging into the router?

More importantly, how can I get Windows & Linux to see the
same 8 or 9 devices on my network that the phone sees *without*  
logging into the router's admin account?

Re: How to list all devices on the Windows or Linux home network
On 02/18/2016 06:42 AM, Anda Lucite wrote:

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It's asking the network and the others replies.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

KDE's dolphin should be able to see all on the network.
Microsoft I don't know, it usually fussy about the domain name.

--  

 //Aho


Re: How to list all devices on the Windows or Linux home network
J.O. Aho wrote:
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Could it be some type of ARP cacheing with comparison to validate and  
provide the ip and MAC addresses ???
--  
...winston
msft mvp windows experience

Re: How to list all devices on the Windows or Linux home network
On 02/18/16 06:42, Anda Lucite wrote:
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I would guess it uses something like avahi or bonjour...

Re: How to list all devices on the Windows or Linux home network
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arp-scan - runs on Linux, needs root.

--  
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
--  Whiskers  
-- ~~~~~~~~~~

Re: How to list all devices on the Windows or Linux home network
On 2/18/16 8:43 AM, Whiskers wrote:
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Whiskers has the secret... "needs root".

I looked into this when I bought my Nexus 7 tablet.  From what I  
learned, basic Android users are "Standard" users, using Windows  
terminology.

Unless things have changed, you will have to "root" your phone.  That  
simply means giving yourself "Administrator" rights.  Never got abound  
to doing it, since I could transfer from anywhere on the network to the  
tablet.


--  
Ken
Mac OS X 10.8.5
Firefox 44.0
Thunderbird 38.0.1
"My brain is like lightning, a quick flash
      and it's gone!"

Re: How to list all devices on the Windows or Linux home network
Ken Springer wrote in message na5usc$agg$1@news.albasani.net

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I don't know yet if Whiskers has the secret because "my" Android
phone (which is NOT rooted!) can "see" all the devices on my network  
(9 of 16) where the other 7 of 16 used to be on the network in the past.

So, Android can see *everything* without being root!
https://i.imgur.com/Szjbr5f.gif

How Android does that, I do not know.

By way of contrast, if I *log* into my router as "admin" (essentially
root), then I can see all the current devices, which are the same
as what Android sees.  

Quoted text here. Click to load it

This is wrong.
Fing will show you EVERYTHING on your network (past and present), without
any need to be root!

Try it to see what I mean and post a screenshot.
  Fing - Network Tools, by Overlook
  https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.overlook.android.fing

HOW Android accomplishes what takes a router to be root is what I'm  
trying to do either on Windows or on Linux.

Re: How to list all devices on the Windows or Linux home network
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that looks like the results of some sort of scan, have you tried nmap.


--  
  \_(?)_

Re: How to list all devices on the Windows or Linux home network
Jasen Betts wrote in message na8i5f$8a9$4@gonzo.alcatraz

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The nmap program, run as the user, suffered a similar fate
in that it only found 7 devices on the network:
 192.168.1.{1,2,5,8,11,116,200)
 https://i.imgur.com/sSx7ue5.gif

Whereas Fing run on an unrooted Android at the same time
found 11 devices on the network:  
 192.168.1.{1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,11,116,200)
 https://i.imgur.com/x86hXcc.gif

Both devices were next to each other, and both were run at
the same time, both as the regular user.

Yet Fing found 4 devices that nmap couldn't find:
  192.168.1.{3,4,6,7)

3 = Ooma
4 = Apple
6 = Apple
7 = Windows

Re: How to list all devices on the Windows or Linux home network
On 2/18/16 9:45 PM, Anda Lucite wrote:
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Obviously, my info is dated.

That being said, Fing isn't the answer for me.  I'm not interested in  
monitoring the network.  I'm interested in file management across the  
network.  In my case, I'm using an Android tablet.


--  
Ken
Mac OS X 10.8.5
Firefox 44.0
Thunderbird 38.0.1
"My brain is like lightning, a quick flash
      and it's gone!"

Re: How to list all devices on the Windows or Linux home network
Ken Springer wrote in message nag3bq$77e$1@news.albasani.net

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A lot may depend on what you mean by file management.

For me, when I am on Windows or Linux and I want to access files on Android  
or on iOS, what I do is start a freeware FTP server on Android or on iOS,  
which then allows the File Explorer on Linux (Dolphin or Nautilus, for  
example) and on Windows (Windows Explorer I think it's called) to see the
entire mobile device in the file explorer GUI.

Re: How to list all devices on the Windows or Linux home network
On 2/23/16 5:00 AM, Anda Lucite wrote:
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I prefer to have things networked, so I can open Windows Explorer,  
Finder (OS X), or ?????? on the tablet, and just move/copy/store/ etc.  
as I wish.

All I have to do is start the system, nothing extra.


--  
Ken
Mac OS X 10.8.5
Firefox 44.0
Thunderbird 38.0.1
"My brain is like lightning, a quick flash
      and it's gone!"

Re: How to list all devices on the Windows or Linux home network
Ken Springer wrote in message nahpa6$71o$1@news.albasani.net

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If you have that working, it's better than what I have working, because
what I have working is that I have to manually start the FTP server on
the iOS or Android mobile device first - and only after doing that - then
I can access any file on Android and any "available" file on iOS from
either the Linus or Windows default graphical file explorer.

So how do *you* manage to do what I do, but automatically?
What software are you using on which platform?

Re: How to list all devices on the Windows or Linux home network
On 2/23/16 9:09 AM, Anda Lucite wrote:
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All my computers that I normally use are networked, so I can move files  
among them as I please, using any of the computers.  In the case of this  
Mac, it's a PITA to get working, and I actually just mapped the drives I  
wanted to use.  I never have figured out how to open the Mac in Windows  
Explorer, even though the Mac shows up under Network in Windows Explorer.

My tablet is a Nexus 7, Marshmallow 6.0.1  When everything was fully  
working like I would like, I was running Kit Kat 4.4.  But 5 and newer  
broke my Bluetooth mouse.  I've switched file management programs on the  
tablet.  When I was using ????????? on the tablet, I could move files  
between the Mac and tablet no problem.  But I found out that file  
manager calls home, so I dumped it and installed X-Plore.  It has never  
been able to talk to the Mac, and I even reported it to the author.  I  
like this program because it uses a treeview, not just a list of items  
that take some sleuthing to figure out where what is.

To get around that issue, I found a program called Android File Transfer  
for the Mac.  Worked great until Google broke it with an update.

My uses for the tablet have diminished to the point where the problems  
created by updating don't really bother me, so I've not made any effort  
into tracking down the problem.

But I had it backwards in my original post.  I can't see the tablet on  
the Windows computers, that's why the tablet needs to be rooted.  But  
every windows computer is there, and I can copy/move/etc. between tablet  
and computer till the cows come home.


--  
Ken
Mac OS X 10.8.5
Firefox 44.0
Thunderbird 38.0.1
"My brain is like lightning, a quick flash
      and it's gone!"

Re: How to list all devices on the Windows or Linux home network
Ken Springer wrote in message nai30q$ous$1@news.albasani.net

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If you run a freeware FTP program, on Windows or Linux you can easily explore
Android or iOS file systems using the normal Windows or Linux point-and-click  
graphical file explorer.

There's nothing to it.

(I don't have a Mac so I can't tell you anything about the Mac.)

Re: How to list all devices on the Windows or Linux home network
Whiskers wrote in message
slrnncbpkd.v2.catwheezel@ID-107770.user.individual.net

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$ which arp-scan
/usr/bin/arp-scan

$ arp-scan --version
arp-scan 1.8.1

$ arp-scan
You need to be root, or arp-scan must be SUID root, to open a link-layer socket.
link_open: Operation not permitted

$ sudo arp-scan
ioctl: Cannot assign requested address
WARNING: Could not obtain IP address for interface eth0. Using 0.0.0.0 for
the source address, which is probably not what you want.
Either configure eth0 with an IP address, or manually specify the address
with the --arpspa option.
Interface: eth0, datalink type: EN10MB (Ethernet)
Usage: arp-scan [options] [hosts...]

$ sudo arp-scan --interface=wlan0 --localnet
Interface: wlan0, datalink type: EN10MB (Ethernet)
Starting arp-scan 1.8.1 with 256 hosts (http://www.nta-monitor.com/tools/arp-scan /)
192.168.1.1     84:1b:5e:xx:xx:xx       (Unknown)
192.168.1.3     00:18:61:xx:xx:xx       Ooma, Inc.
192.168.1.7     00:1f:3b:xx:xx:xx       Intel Corporate
192.168.1.2     5c:0a:5b:xx:xx:xx       (Unknown)
192.168.1.5     40:b0:fa:xx:xx:xx       (Unknown)
192.168.1.5     40:b0:fa:xx:xx:xx       (Unknown) (DUP: 2)
192.168.1.116   00:10:83:xx:xx:xx       HEWLETT-PACKARD COMPANY
192.168.1.200   00:16:b6:xx:xx:xx       Cisco-Linksys

8 packets received by filter, 0 packets dropped by kernel
Ending arp-scan 1.8.1: 256 hosts scanned in 1.543 seconds (165.91 hosts/sec). 8 responded


The good news is that arp-scan found many of the same devices that
Fing found in a scan at the very same time.

The really BAD NEWS is that arp-scan totally missed *all* the Apple
devices that were on my network - which Fing easily found!


Re: How to list all devices on the Windows or Linux home network
Anda Lucite wrote:
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"ARP versus ICMP/ping"

http://archive09.linux.com/feature/50596

    "One possible drawback to this system of using ARP to ping
     a host is that the ARP protocol is not a routed protocol.
     If you are not on the same subnet as the host you are
     trying to connect to, then this method is not going to
     work without first joining that subnet, which may or may
     not be physically possible."

Probably time for a Networking 101 class at
school, then get the instructor to cover
all the possibilities for you :-)

A purpose built tool, might need more than one method.
And if nameservers were involved (Bonjour, Avahi,
SSDP, NetBIOS, UPNP, DLNA, kitchen_sink), you might
actually need a daemon or DLL or something added to
the system, to aid in participation in the scheme.
So what you're looking for, a heterogenous solution,
might be a little more complicated to build, than
a solution that only needs to work with its own OS
partners.

Having a nameserver, allows perhaps determining what
services a device offers. Whether it's a printer
or a TV set that plays streamed movies.

Ping used to work fine, until someone considered it
a security risk, and servers started disabling ICMP.
There is partial or full disable-ment possible. For
example, my former ISP did such a good job, the
email server could no longer handle fragmented packets,
and you could only send very short emails (ones that
fit in a single packet). I was required to change the
maximum packet size on my end, to make email work again.
And the tech support at the ISP, swore up and down,
that their end had nothing to do with it :-)

I never took Networking 101. But I have known people
who have tried to study this stuff in detail. Our
masters grad at work, it took *two years* to assemble
a document listing all the protocols and a thumbnail
of details for each one. I never got to see the
resulting document. I'm sure he benefited from the effort,
paid for by our employer. Software architect class individuals
would use that document for product planning.

*******

The listing in your router, is the DHCP list.
Computing devices needing a dynamic address, use
a "lease" with the router. The router keeps a pool
of addresses for the purpose. It might be
reasonably complete, except for static addresses
you assign to devices, which is on the same subnet,
but outside the range of pool addresses. The
presence or absence (powered off) state of a
static device, wouldn't show up in the router list.

Some protocols, require the participants to "cache"
recently seen objects. For example, using Windows file
sharing, I can see references to items that are no longer
on the network. There will be some "wheel spinning"
on Windows, if it is required to try to find a
non-existent file sharing device. A disadvantage of
caching references to them.

And if I could find a decent article on heterogenous
environments, I would have pasted it into this
posting by now :-) I don't know if this is a
popular topic, or why any web site would bother
carrying the information needed. For example,
a Macintosh site is not likely to entertain articles
about Windows, or vice versa.

    Paul

Re: How to list all devices on the Windows or Linux home network
Paul wrote in message na70t0$t3$1@dont-email.me

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Me neither. I wish they taught that in high school
instead of algebra.

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The router (as admin) is accurate.
The (unrooted) iPad (with Fing) is accurate.  
The (unrooted) Android (with Fing) is accurate.

Yet, the (root) arp-cache on Linux is missing all my
iPads!

The question is what Linux program (or Windows) can
list *all* the devices on the network?

Re: How to list all devices on the Windows or Linux home network
Anda Lucite wrote:

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Any method that will work, will need to use
multiple methods. While a single, simple method
will "mainly" work, it's the exception cases
that need to be covered with more methods.

Try to track down the source code for any
program (on any platform), that is doing
a good job for you. Check the comments in
the code, to see how many network features
it is using to identify all devices.
That's the best I can suggest, to get
a handle on what alternate set of tools
might work.

    Paul

Re: How to list all devices on the Windows or Linux home network
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if you only want to find the devices fing finds do an arp scan.  
if you want to find all devices attached to your network (including
those fing does not find) you could try a MAC scan, but you'd  
die before it completed.


--  
  \_(?)_

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