How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house? - Page 3

Have a question or want to start a discussion? Post it! No Registration Necessary.  Now with pictures!

Threaded View
Re: How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Follow-up post:

   Newegg will sell you two LINKSYS PLE200 (up to 200Mbps) PowerLine AV
   Ethernet Adapters for $130 (much less than Jeff's $200).

Please do keep up.  ;)

--
Very best wishes for the holiday season and for the coming new year,
John

Re: How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?
John Navas wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
Quote from same post:-
"I'm willing to bet you'll spend less money and I know you'll have a lot
less hassle with powerline networking."
The fact that Newegg will sell Powerline AV adapters does not alter the
fact that you SAID " Powerline Networking" in that post as well and in
neither post did you specify a recommendation only for the use of
"Powerline AV adapters".

Re: How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?

Quoted text here. Click to load it


That's a pretty lame comeback.  :)
Whatever.

--
Very best wishes for the holiday season and for the coming new year,
John

Re: How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I've never played with a HomePlug AV 200mhz system.  The above article
shows "typical real world" performance to be 45mbits/sec.  That's good
enough for the OP's applications (video and general web browsing).

Also, they use PCATTCP for benchmarking:
<http://www.pcausa.com/Utilities/pcattcp.htm
which works ok.  However, I find the IPeft and JPeft to be more up to
date and far more accurate for higher speeds.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Yep.  I get the same thing with IPerf and JPerf.  I have no idea why
or what's going on.  (Yet another project).  In general, TCP is
accurate, while UDP is a crap shoot.  Incidentally, you have to set
both the server and client to UDP (the default is TCP).  If different,
the program still belch results, but the thruput is really low.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Those were one of the first HomePlug products.  I agree on the
overheating problem.  Not good.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I was trying to work with products that one can actually.  However,
it's great to know that everything available is now instantly obsolete
thanks to the standards process.  Argh.

Drivel:  A neighbor calls complaining that his router is acting weird.
I tell him to "unplug the router, wait about 30 seconds, plug it back
in, and try again".  4 tries spaced over an hour time and no luck.
When I arrive, I find that he's unplugging the ethernet cable.  I can
tell this is going to be a bad week.

--
Jeff Liebermann     jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann     AE6KS    831-336-2558

Re: How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?

Quoted text here. Click to load it

That's why I tell my clients to wait until the lights go out (and stay
out for at least 20 secs) before plugging it back in.  ;)

--
Very best wishes for the holiday season and for the coming new year,
John

Re: How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?
wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

They stacked the number slightly in their favor:
They're using
  64K socket buffers.
  5000 source buffers (twice normal)
  8760 buffer size (slightly larger than the 8192 default)
My guess(tm) is that using more realistic values, the thruput will be
noticably less.  Hmmm... no numbers, no test results, very strange.



--
Jeff Liebermann     jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann     AE6KS    831-336-2558

Re: How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?
Jeff Liebermann wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
When I returned my Netgear adapters I considered getting a couple of
"Piggy's" from Solwise
<http://www.solwise.co.uk/net-powerline-av-push-piggy.htm#SPECS
However I put it on hold due to a variety of info on their Forum.
They use the Intellon chip in the unit and towards the end of 2007 a
f/ware upgrade was issued to comply with "new" CE reg's and the comments
were:-
1."Well it turns out that, in order to meet new CE regulations, the
newer f/w version has got a different emc calibration file. By that I
mean they have some slightly different frequency notching and also
changes to the frequency power densities in order to comply with these
regulations. The effects are that it's possible to get a small amount of
radio interference on the old f/w but with more power and speed. The
newer f/w is less likely to cause interference but has reduced power and
slightly lower speed."
2."Our in house tests show the AV units with ver 2 or later f/w to be up
to 20% slower. TBH it depends upon the quality of the mains. With good
mains the difference is quite small."
3."Okay... I've spoken to Intellon and they say there are no tools
available to end users to do a f/w downgrade. However, we (Solwise),
have managed to get hold of the engineers only tool so that we CAN do
this downgrade for you. Sorry but this software is NOT for general
release - Intellon will NOT be happy at all if we let this software out
of the door."
They were from
<http://www.solwiseforum.co.uk/archive/index.php?t-8391.html

I suppose like most things you pays your money...

Re: How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?


wrote:

12:30AM.  My appologies if my brain is not quite functional.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Thick walls are bad for RF.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Yep.  This is not a good use for wireless.  Some other method of
connecting the two routers will be necessary.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Nope.
1.  It probably won't go thorugh the thick wall any better. Increasing
the power at one end of the link doesn't magically do the same for the
other end.  You would need two of these repeaters (one at each router)
in order for it to work.  
2.  MIMO (802.11n) doesn't like repeaters.  That's another reason why
the antennas are non-removeable.  MIMO requires seperate paths between
the antennas with slightly different delays.  Unfortunately this only
increases the speed, not the range.  As soon as you have a marginal
signal quality, the wireless access point will revert to 802.11g
speeds ( <54mbits/sec).  If the signal quality really sucks, then it
can easily go down to 802.11b speeds, and finally hit bottom at
1Mbit/sec.
3.  Store and forward repeaters reduce the maximum speed by half for
each hop.  Actually, it's usually worse than half.  I don't think
you'll like that.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Those are still around.  As previously mentioned, you'll need one at
each end.  Even so, I don't think it will work through the thick wall.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Yep.  MIMO (802.11n) routers usually do that.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Sure, lots of alternatives.  Have your credit card handy.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

It reduces the MAXIMUM speed in half (or less).  For example, if you
manage to squeeze a 12Mbit/sec wireless direct connection through your
thick wall, you'll get a theoretical maximum thruput (50% reduction
due to protocol overhead).  Add a repeater in the middle, and you cut
that in half again for a maximum thruput of 3Mbits/sec.  As I
mentioned, that's under ideal conditions and is usually somewhat less.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

That's a fairly typical mix.  Netflix is a big bandwidth user.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Yeah, fairly good description.  The distance between the two routers
would have been useful.  Some suggestions:

1.  Run CAT5 ethernet cable between the two routers.  This is the best
and fastest alternative.  The WRT150N goes to the DSL modem and gets
to play router.  The WRT300N acts as an ethernet switch, wireless
access point, and has the router section disabled.  Note that any
wireless router can be uses as an access point:
<http://wireless.navas.us/wiki/Wi-Fi_How_To#Use_a_wireless_router_as_a_wireless_access_point
Having a wireless connection at each end of the house might be handy
if you have laptops and PDA's with wireless.  Also, put the two
wireless routers on different non-overlapping channels (1, 6, 11) so
that they don't interefere with each other.

2.  If you have any other runs of wire between routers (i.e. phone
wire, 25 pair bundle, alarm wire, CATV coax, zip cord, junk wire,
barbed wire, etc), you can run ethernet over the 4 wires.  Various
common technologies are:
- HomePNA   phone line networking
- HomePlug  power line networking
- 10Base2   ethernet over coax cable
- 10baseT   ethernet over CAT5 or whatever else you can scrounge.
Just about any kind of wire can be bludgeoned into carrying ethernet.
There's also fiber optic cable and media converters, which will work
if you have access to a source of cheap fiber.

I don't wanna explain how all of these work and are used.  If one or
more looks interesting, post a reply and I'll fill in the blanks.

--
Jeff Liebermann     jeffl@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann     AE6KS    831-336-2558

Site Timeline