How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?

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Currently, we have two DSL lines:

EAST SIDE OF HOUSE: in an add-on "office" room separated by thick
walls).  This DSL line leads to a Linksys WRT150N router, which is
connected one computer and three TiVos.

WEST SIDE OF HOUSE: in the living room.  This DSL line leads to a
Linksys WRT300N router, which is connected to one laptop, and one
color printer.

We are about to get rid of Line #2, the DSL line in the living room,
leaving only the DSL line in the office, and we would like all devices
to be connected to that one router.  However, the wireless signal gets
very weak as it travels through the thick walls of the add-on room and
across the house.  

Can we increase that signal -- either by boosting it at the source, or
by adding something like a "repeater" somewhere in the middle of the
house?


Years ago, we had some kind of "booster" device that connected
directly to our old router.  The old router had removable antennae,
and this booster device sat right on top of it, connected to the
router by two wires.  The booster looked almost exactly like the
router -- blue, and about the same size.  It had its own antennae.

I notice that the antennae don't come off of our current WRT150N, so
that might hurt the "booster" idea.


Another solution...?  We're about to have a spare WRT300N just sitting
around.  Perhaps we could park that somewhere in the middle of the
house and it could pass the signal along...?

However, I've heard comments like "Adding a repeater splits the signal
in half."


The number one use for our bandwidth, by a longshot, will be from the
computer in the office, the one about six feet from the WRT150N.  The
only other devices that might even come close would be the TiVos --
say, if we watch YouTube videos, or decide to watch a Netflix movie on
demand.


I hope I've provided enough information for someone to help us with
our choice.  Do we already have all the devices we need, or do we need
to buy some additional "booster" or "repeater?"


Thanks in advance.

Re: How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?

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Best solution: Use powerline networking to connect the WRT300N as an
access point (not router) in the living room to the WRT150N in the
office.  Put them on non-overlapping channels with the same SSID.

Repeaters cut speed in half by retransmitting everything, and can be a
security hassle.

--
Very best wishes for the holiday season and for the coming new year,
John

Re: How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?
On Sat, 27 Dec 2008 16:48:20 -0800, John Navas wrote:

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http://bluwiki.com/go/WirelessPenisNavas

John, what is all of that about?
--
Meet Ari! http://tr.im/1fa3
"To get concrete results, you have to be confrontational".

Re: How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?
On Sat, 27 Dec 2008 16:48:20 -0800, John Navas

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Thank you for the reply.

I have some extra detail to offer about our house, and also some extra
questions.  But I find that I've already typed most of it in my reply
to Jeff Liebermann's post.

Still, I should ask:

If I tell you that the WRT300N router doesn't have to stay on the far
west side of the house, and that by moving it to the middle of the
house, it will get a not-bad wireless signal from the WRT150N router,
does that change your recommendation?

I'll paste my ASCII diagram, along with a summary of what signal
strength is carried along to each room.


============================================================


East: DSL Modem.  Signal starts here.

Middle: 25 feet away in a straight line (through thick walls).  Or
about 40 feet, through the door and around corners.

West: About 20 feet further than Middle.

South: 25 to 30 feet away from Middle.


                      25' or 40'

West -- 20' -- Middle --|    |-- East
                  |     |    |
                  |      ----
                 25'
                  |
                  |
                South


East (office):
"94% (excellent)" from a TiVo.

Middle (family & dining room):
"64% (good)" from a TiVo
"2 out of 5 bars" from a laptop

West (living room):
"2 out of 5 bars" from a laptop

South (exercise room):
"41% (marginal)" from a TiVo


============================================================

Re: How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?
On Sat, 27 Dec 2008 16:48:20 -0800, John Navas

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Now that I have purchased and received the Linksys PLE200 Powerline AV
Ethernet Adaptors, I see that configuring them is probably not going
to be the challenging part.

The challenging part will be figuring out to do with the WRT300N in
order to "turn it into an access point."

Please forgive me if my questions are a little fuzzy; they're a match
for my current thinking.  I'll tell you my current understanding of
what I need to do, and then the questions that I have based on that
understanding.


==================================================
MY CURRENT UNDERSTANDING:

based in large part on a couple of URLs:
http://forums.linksys.com/linksys/board/message?board.id=Wireless_Routers&message.id=17102
http://forums.linksys.com/linksys/board/message?board.id=Wireless_Routers&message.id=8768


Distilled (so far):

Hook up the [input source] to the 300N using the LAN port(s) [on the
300N]. Do not use the internet port on the 300N.

Login to WRT300N (you may need to disconnect you modem/router for some
time).

Set up the Wireless Settings as you prefer.

  Configure the device in AP ("Access Point?") mode, you'll need the
wireless SSID, channel and security settings same as your wireless
router.

Change the local IP address of the router to the range of your router,
(specifically, set it to a static IP of 192.168.1.2)
Disable the DHCP server on the WRT300N.
  (and disable NAT on the WRT300N, I'm pretty sure)

Put the two wireless routers on different non-overlapping channels (1,
6, 11) so that they don't interfere with each other.

(Wide vs. Standard?  If you use "wide", it's fixed to channel 6 as it
now hogs the entire band.  The only way you can set the channel is to
use standard (narrow) bandwidth.)

Your WRT300N will work as Access point.


==================================================
MY QUESTIONS:

I just read through the WRT300N manual, and nowhere does it say
"Follow the instructions in this section if you plan to use the
WRT300N as an access point, rather than a router."

Do I need to do some global switcheroo, to tell the device "You are
now an 'access point.' You are no longer a router.  Some things that
you think you need to do, you will no longer be doing." ?

It just seems odd to me that both the router and the access point
("AP") might be trying to assign IP addresses -- especially in
different ranges.  After all, I'm sure that a couple of the Tivos will
be able to communicate with both the router and the AP; do I really
want both devices trying to assign IP addresses?

(By "router," I mean the WRT150N, and by "AP," I mean the WRT300N, now
being used as an access point.)

Does the AP assign IP addresses?  Should I give the first router
permission to assign 101 through 120, and give the AP permission to
assign 121 through 140?

I'm setting the AP to a hard-coded 192.168.1.2 ?
What do I set Subnet Mask to?  255.255.255.0 ?

Do I retype our ISP's settings (Default Gateway, DNS, etc.) into the
AP to make them match what we have entered into the main router?

Of all the existing settings in the Linksys configuration screens, how
many do I have to go into and think about?
Should I basically go through every tab of settings on the AP and set
them to match the router?  (e.g., if uPNP is off on the router, then
it's off on the AP, etc.?)

Since I have N devices, don't I want to keep "Wide?"  Isn't that more
throughput?  Or am I better off changing to "Standard?"

Are there any special steps to take to make sure that our devices (a
laptop and two iPhones that I forgot to mention) can roam, presumably
meaning that they'll get their signal from whichever router or AP is
closer?

==================================================

Basically, I'm just not clear on how to think about two devices -- one
router and one access point.  Are they nearly identical, with nearly
identical settings?  Or is the access point "dumb," with far fewer
settings, and all of the "heavy lifting" is handled by the main
router?


If someone (and I guess by this point, I'm thinking it'll probably be
a someone named Jeff or John) wants to help unfuzzy my thinking, it
would be much appreciated.


Happy New Years!  :-)

Re: How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?

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<http://wireless.navas.us/wiki/Wi-Fi_How_To#Use_a_wireless_router_as_a_wireless_access_point


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Yes,




Yes.




Won't matter.




Yes.




Use narrow.




Yes.




Not surprising.




No.  Just do the above.


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No,  That's why you need to turn off the 2nd DHCP server.


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The router assigns addresses through the access point.


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255.255.0.0





No.  The access point is transparent.


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Just the above.  


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No.  Don't make it harder than it is.


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Wide can cause interference.  Stick to narrow,


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They should automatically select the stronger signal if the two have the
same SSID.


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The access point is dumb, and the router does all the lifting.


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--
Very best wishes for the holiday season and for the coming new year,
John

Re: How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?
Thanks for the quick reply.  A couple questions on the FAQ...


On Wed, 31 Dec 2008 19:20:12 -0800, John Navas

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The FAQ says:
"Set IP address (manually)."  

By "manually," I assume you still mean using the I.E. and the Linksys
config tools.  Can I set the IP address once it's already separated by
the main PC by a router and the Powerline network, or do I need to
temporarily connect it directly to the main computer?

OR...  I could do it right now, before I disconnect the WRT300N from
the laptop it currently talks to.  Set the IP address and THEN connect
it to the Powerline adapter... ?

By the way, I assume it's "IP Address," not "Internet IP Address" that
I'm setting to 192.168.1.2?  (and that I'm changing Internet IP
Address to 0.0.0.0 or something null like that?)



The FAQ says:
"Connect (Ethernet) cable to LAN port, not WAN/Internet port."

By "LAN port(s)," you mean the 4 ports that I think of as output
ports?  as opposed to the one port labeled "Internet" that I think of
as the only input port?



The FAQ says:
"May need to use crossover type cable."

Should I assume that with the Powerline networking in place, I won't
need to use a crossover type cable?  (Two cables came with the two
powerline devices; I don't think either is crossover.)



The FAQ says:
"Disable any wireless-to-wired isolation feature."

I don't really know what this means at all.


Other little notes:

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Ah, so that's what I'm doing when I turn off DHCP.  Okay.


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Won't there still be form fields on the config screens to enter all
these values?  (In fact, they'll probably be populated full of the
old, out-of-date values.)

If I'm *not* entering any values, then do I make sure the form fields
are blank, or set to 0.0.0.0?


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Excellent.  Thanks again.

Re: How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?

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Correct,


Temporarily connect it to any computer, or

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Correct.


The access point must have a non-conflicting address on the same subnet,
one that isn't being handed out by the DHCP server, so if router DHCP is
handing out (say) 192.168.1.2 - 192.168.1.254, then the access point
could be 192.168.2.1, with the subnet mask 255.255.0.0 configured in the
router.

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No need to mess with the Internet address.

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Correct.


Probably not.


Look in the menus of the WRT300N for any isolation features, and turn
OFF any that you find.

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Correct.


Just ignore them -- they don't matter.

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1. Before you start on the WRT300N, wire a computer to the remote
powerline adapter and test it thoroughly to be sure powerline networking
is working well.

2. Then wire the computer to the WRT300N (LAN port) to the powerline
adapter to be sure that is working well.

3. Then test the wireless on the WRT300N with all security (router and
access point) turned OFF.

4. Then turn security ON.  Use the same strong WPA PSK key on the router
and the access point.  No other security matters.

5. Test everything.  

6. Roaming between router and access point may not work seamlessly with
a computer still powered up -- you may have to power down and back up,
or just disable and re-enable Wi-Fi, to change associations.

--
Very best wishes for the holiday season and for the coming new year,
John

Re: How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?

Here's my status, as of 1/1/09, 2:20 PM.

I have this much of the signal connected:

from DSL modem
to router
to powerline network adapters (connected via powerline)
to access point (AP).

From there, I'm getting a little iffy -- about whether the access
point is transmitting wirelessly, about whether the iPhones are able
to roam, and what to do about our 6-year-old laptop not supporting WPA
or WPA2.


I'll post a couple comments below, then ask a couple more questions.


On Wed, 31 Dec 2008 21:13:53 -0800, John Navas

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I had no choice but to put something in.  The Linksys software demands
5 fields of information (under "Setup > Basic Setup," with the
dropdown set to Static IP).  I'll list them here and tell you what I
put in each one.

Right under the "Static IP" dropdown:

Internet IP Address: 192.168.1.2
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway: 192.168.1.1 (my best guess)


Under "Network Setup > Router IP":

IP Address: 192.168.1.2 (should this have been "192.168.1.1?")
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0

I think I might have screwed up with putting a 2 instead of a 1 in
that second "IP Address" field.



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Okay.  The only place I saw the word "isolation" is under "Wireless >
Advanced Wireless Settings > AP Isolation."  That is disabled on both
the router and the access point.



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Okay.  They have been ignored (left at their default settings, which
is 0.0.0.0).


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Hmm...  More on roaming in a minute.


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I did this.  Streaming YouTube over the powerline connection was no
problem.


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I can now connect to both routers from the one main computer in the
office.  I've got their configuration screens open right now.  ".1.1"
in IE and ".1.2" in Firefox, just to keep my own head straight.


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Hmm.  Actually, I went straight to secure mode.


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Hmm...  More on WPA, WPA2, PSK, PSK2, etc. in a minute.



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Notes (starting with the biggest issue, then working down):


I discovered that our 6-year-old laptop doesn't seem to support WPA or
WPA2.  However, a networking friend once gave us a WPC300N wireless-n
notebook adapter which I'll research.  If it seems that it will offer
us any kind of WPA, then I'll install it.

If not, then I think the laptop will have to settle for simply
plugging into ethernet cables (attached to powerline adapters) in each
of the two main rooms it likes to visit.

=====

In an attempt to solve some early problem I was having, I reset the
WRT300N to factory defaults, then began entering fresh settings from
there.

=====

After saving certain changes on the new 192.168.1.2 (usually changes
on the Wireless tab), I can no longer connect to it until I go
manually reboot it (by unplugging it).  (Could this in some way be
related to setting one of the IP addresses incorrectly on the Basic
Setup tab?)

=====

My WRT150N has these (wireless) Security Mode options:
WEP
WPA Personal
WPA2 Personal
WPA Enterprise
WPA2 Enterprise
(and a couple others)

The WRT300N has those same options, except that it lists "PSK" in
place of "WPA" for those 4 options.

I'm thinking that PSK2 and WPA2 in some way synonymous or
compatible... ?  But I don't know why the two Linksys routers would
report them differently.

=====

I don't know a perfect way to test that the access point is actually
providing any wireless signal.  Walking around the house with our
iPhones, trying to read their signals, is a little flaky.  It seems
like the ideal way to test would be to somehow turn off the wireless
signal on the main router (without just unplugging it from the wall).
But I don't know how to do that.

Instead, I just walked out the front door, across the street and down
one house, to the limit of where our WiFi network will reach, then
asked my girlfriend to unplug the access point.  When she did, I lost
my connection to WiFi, so I'll take that to mean that the wireless
signal is working.

I'll do some more tests in a bit, such as checking the signal strength
of the Tivos to see if they've improved since last reporting in at
"Good" and "Marginal."

=====

For now, it seems like the number one question involves what to do
about the WEP-only laptop, and will the Wireless-N Notebook Adapter
get us some WPA-level security?


I'm open to any input (especially if I've made any obvious errors),
but otherwise I think I'm well on my way to getting this handled.

Thanks again.

Dave

Re: How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?

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Easily tested with the SSID -- change it to "my access point" on the
access point, and see if that's visible (along with the SSID of the
router) in your wireless clients.  Go back to the same SSID when you
have it all working, or stick with different SSIDs for manual roaming.

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Seamless roaming is problematic -- many clients try to stubbornly hang
on to a uselessly weak signal even though a much stronger signal is
available.

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Seriously consider getting a PCMCIA or USB Wi-Fi adapter that supports
WPA PSK (Personal).

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Put anything in -- doesn't matter.

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Follow my instructions.

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Great.


That's not what I said.  Make sure a computer wired to the WRT300N (LAN
port) can access the Internet.

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Bad idea.  Follow my instructions to the letter.

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Did wireless work or not on both the router and the access point?

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Good.


OK.


I really don't know.  You didn't follow my instructions, and I can't
follow what you posted.

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Don't mess with security until it's completely working.

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Unique SSID.  See above.

Take things one step at a time.

--
Very best wishes for the holiday season and for the coming new year,
John

Re: How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?

Okay, it's all done!  We now have all of our devices connected, in
some way or another to a single DSL line, and they're all receiving a
nice, strong signal.

I doubt that anyone is waiting with baited breath to hear about it,
but I figured I should post one final time to give feedback and
thanks.


On Thu, 01 Jan 2009 15:24:27 -0800, John Navas

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A few times in this thread, we bumped into a problem that happens when
an expert tries to explain things to an amateur: their level of
understanding is so different that it's hard for each of them to
picture what the other one knows.

The amateur can't see which detail is important and which isn't, so
he'll fixate on something that the expert knows he can ignore.  And
the expert has such a deeply ingrained knowledge, that he literally
can't picture which parts the amateur doesn't know.

In this case, I got all the way through the process without realizing
that it was even possible to change the SSID on the access point to
something other than the same one on the router.

However, I found other ways to test that the access point was sending
a signal.  For example, the Linksys adapter software I had to install
on the laptop gives a clear display, showing the router's SSID at
channel 1 as a different entry than the access point's channel 6
entry, each with different signal strengths.


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I'm still not sure how the access point will know which router it is
supposed to talk to if I give them different SSIDs.  Through the
passphrase maybe?  Or maybe my understanding of how they work together
is still too incomplete.  In any case, everything is working with them
using the same SSID.


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This is definitely an "expert vs. amateur" issue.  I started this
thread, simply looking to boost the signal from one router.  Then
suddenly found that I was learning about how to configure wireless
access points across powerline networks, and issues like manual vs.
seamless roaming.  

I had previously never used the work "roaming" except when thinking
about how much it costs to make a call from my cell phone while I'm in
another state.

Again, fortunately, everything is working with both devices using the
same SSID.


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Done.  Thanks.


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Another "expert vs. amateur" issue.  I found myself looking at a
screen that looks something like this:

http://www.cnet.com.au/story_media/339274148/wireless-network-setup-5.gif

The screen demanded that I enter some value into every field, and I
couldn't tell which fields were important and which weren't.  They
were already populated with numbers (from the access point's previous
life as a router) and I, the amateur, couldn't see how to *not* fill
them out with numbers.

On the other hand, you, the expert, know that...  well, I'm not sure
what you know.  Hence the "expert vs. amateur" situation.  But I
*think* that what you know that the device will ignore the numbers
entered into certain of those fields.


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[I'll delete a couple of paragraphs here.]


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This was definitely an "expert vs. amateur" moment, where, to the
expert, it's clear what the amateur should do when reading an
instruction that says "test the wireless on the WRT300N with all
security (router and access point) turned off."

The amateur doesn't know what it would mean to turn the security off.
(maybe simply deleting the passphrase in each setup screen?  but
somewhere here, my mental model of how the router and the access point
know that they're supposed to be on the same network is falling
apart.)

In any case, the amateur has already taken a couple days of the
expert's time, and suddenly finds that he's got two choices: Leave it
all working as it is now, or start asking a whole new round of
questions.


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Wireless works on both devices.  Thanks.


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I can believe that you can't follow what I posted.  "Expert vs.
amateur" again.

In any case, things are working well now.  I was a little shaky on
what exactly I was doing at certain steps, but it's all okay now.

Everything is working.  The Tivos are getting much improved signals,
we have two iPhones that can receive wi-fi from more rooms than
before, and even a couple printers that are now on the single network,
accessible from both computers.


By the way, I've been on both sides of the "expert vs. amateur"
spectrum.  When I'm helping my mom or dad do something on their
computer, and I have to trust their descriptions over the phone of
what they're seeing, it can be difficult.


So I thank you again for your time.  And as a little extra thanks...
Have you seen this video?

The Website Is Down: Sales Guy vs. Web Dude:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BcQ7RkyBoBc


When I first started watching it, my jaw dropped at its 10-minute
running time, but after about 60 seconds, I realized that it was worth
the running time.

I guess I'll leave that video as my final thought on the "expert vs.
amateur" topic, and my final thanks as well.

Re: How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?

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Great!

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Fair criticism -- guilty as charged.  I'm often too terse, depending on
the other party to ask questions as needed, and I tend to assume you've
read the Wireless Wiki.  ;)

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Good.


If a device has profiles of two different SSIDs, it should select the
network with the stronger signal.  What it won't do is roam from one to
the other -- it will stay connected unless and until it loses that
connection whereupon it will start over on a new connection.  With the
same SSID there is at least some chance that a device will roam
seamlessly to the strongest signal, although implementation of roaming
is imperfect and spotty.

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Then don't mess with it.  ;)

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They won't come into play in your configuration, so it doesn't matter
what you have to put in them -- just do whatever it takes to make the
interface happy.

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Most interfaces have a setting for "security off" or "open network".
That, plus not setting MAC address filtering, SSID off, etc, all of
which are non-default, so they would only be on if you did it.

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Cute, all too true, and thank you for taking the time to say "thanks" --
most users don't bother.  Here's my own favorite on the expert vs
amateur issue:

A Day in the Life of Phone Support

[Based on a true story. Names have been changed to protect the not so
innocent.]

HOTLINE: Cut-rate Computers -- we cut corners to cut prices -- how may I
help you?

CALLER: My computer won't work!

HOTLINE: What seems to be the problem?

CALLER: It won't work.

HOTLINE: What do you see on your screen?

CALLER: Nothing.

HOTLINE: Is the screen dark?

CALLER: No.

HOTLINE: What does it look like?

CALLER: Black.

HOTLINE: OK -- are there any lights on the front of the system unit?

CALLER: I have no idea.

HOTLINE: Why not?

CALLER: What's a system unit?

HOTLINE: That's the other big box that you got from the computer store.
Are there any lights?

CALLER: No.

HOTLINE: Try pushing the power button. That's the round button right in
the middle.

CALLER: Nothing.

HOTLINE: Are you sure it's plugged in?

CALLER: Of course I am -- what do you take me for?

HOTLINE: Calm down, sir. Please humor me just to be sure.

CALLER: I can't tell for sure.

HOTLINE: Why not?

CALLER: I can't tell.

HOTLINE: Look around behind the system unit -- er, the big box -- and
see if there's a cord plugged into the wall.

CALLER: I still can't tell.

HOTLINE: Why not?

CALLER: It's too dark.

HOTLINE: Turn on a light.

CALLER: Can't do that.

HOTLINE: Why not?

CALLER: The power has been out for over an hour.

[long silence]

HOTLINE: Sir, I know how to fix your problem.

CALLER: You do? Terrific!

HOTLINE: Do you still have all the boxes your computer came in?

CALLER: Yes.

HOTLINE: Pack it all up and take it back to the computer store.

CALLER: What should I tell them?

HOTLINE: Tell them you're too dumb to own a computer!

<<>>

Re: How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?

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what series tivos? series 1 and  2/3 until the fall update s2's only did
wep,  now 2 for sure does wep/wpa, i hear 3 does too, haven't heard about
1's yet)
(i have 3 S2's, 2 with wireless only b/g supported, and one with a
usb/ethernet converter).. I use the wireless for the devices that support
wpa, 2 s2 tivos, 3 laptops, tablet, pda, and the wired as an ethernet bridge
from the linksys wrt to one tivo in the sunroom that won't get wireless (one
part of the powerline bridge plugs into the router part of the 300 and an ac
outlet, other upstairs in an ac socket and to the ethernet/usb port of the
3rd tivo, not wireless so it doesn't need wpa or wep)

among other things to keep in mind, want wep or wpa, are you lucky enuf not
to need wireless for all your devices?



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http://forums.linksys.com/linksys/board/message?board.id=Wireless_Routers&message.id=17102
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http://forums.linksys.com/linksys/board/message?board.id=Wireless_Routers&message.id=8768
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at any rate, is there some reason you want to complicate things? do you know
if you need wep or wpa? why do you want to figger out how to hobble/kill one
of your devices? Do you need/want seamless roaming on the same ssid? rather
than roaming on two ssid's? Forget n, tivos are b/g only (not sure about
iphone), and your unamed laptop(s) may/may not do n either.....you say you
have 'N' devices, there are no N standards yet, and shile some are actually
pre-n and will play nice with other pre n's.. some won't.... i'd suggest you
consider what exactly you do have first and set it up to work with what you
have, rather than what you'd like/heard about.....



Re: How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?

I'm pretty sure I'm done with all this.  (Please check out the long
reply I just posted.)  However, you put some time into typing a few
thoughts, so I'll respond to them.


On Thu, 1 Jan 2009 18:27:33 -0500, "Peter Pan"
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Two series 3's (well, HD Tivos anyway) and one series 2.

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They all do WPA.


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I'm not sure what you're asking, but each of the three TiVos has its
own Tivo-branded wireless G adapter that gets it on our home network.


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I believe that I want WPA for any device that has to get on our
network wirelessly.


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I'm not sure which device you were referring to here.  I'm hesitant to
take a guess and then type an answer based on that guess.  (Do you
mean connecting the Tivos to the network wirelessly?)

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Now that you mention it, the Tivos certainly aren't going to do much
roaming.  Nor are the printers.  But I think the iPhones enjoy getting
a good connection in each room.


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For the moment, we have three "N devices," each from Linksys.  They
seem to play nice with each other.


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Thanks again for the input.  If you want to elaborate on which device
you think I'm hobbling, I'd be interested in reading your thoughts,
although I suspect that I'm done finessing this for now.

For now, I think it's time for us to learn how our new Panasonic
phones work.

Re: How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?
dgates wrote:
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no biggie, heck it works, and since you have s2's and s3's you don't have to
worry about gotchas.. until the fall update, the tivo wireless only
supported wep (they added wpa in the fall software update, don't know about
s1 tivos, nor directivo's)... (my pda only supports wep, so when I changed
from wep to wpa after the tivo software update had to figger out what worked
and what didn't anymore)

That unit (both the 150 and 300 default to b/g/n (compatibility with b/g
devices), it's only when you make them n ONLY that the tivos won't see/work
with em, and you run into the my n and their n definitions problems)

not sure what version of iphone you have, but the one i have works on b/g
compatibility, not n only.... same with my tablet and pda (and the pda only
work on b/g wep)

at any rate, the hobbling was in reference to your making changes for
seemless roaming... I just have two different ssid's and plug the second
into the router part of the first (no changing ip addresses, or
disabling/hobblng, parts of a wap/router to make it a wap only)

like i said, heck it works for you, there is no right/wrong/only one way to
do it, just wanted to warn you about some gotchas I ran into, in case they
applied/made sense in your situation.....

just out of cuurioity, what Panasonic phones?



Re: How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?
On Sun, 4 Jan 2009 14:57:08 -0500, "Peter Pan"

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==============================

(pasting from another post)


I was about to spend $50 or more to replace our handset for our old
Panasonic phone ( (Amazon.com product link shortened) ) when I
realized that for $71, I could buy a whole new system -- with three
handsets, rather than the two we have now:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)

I considered spending a little more for "digital," but I didn't know
exactly what it would get me and I didn't like the reduced battery
life.

==============================

New thoughts:

I'm not sure we're happy with the sound quality of the new phones.  I
guess that I was so busy thinking about networking that I was hoping I
could just take it easy on the phone decision, figuring that any
new-ish phone with good Amazon reviews would be good enough.

Now that they're here, I'm starting to wonder.  For example, our old
phones were 5.8 GHz.  The new ones are 1.9 GHz.  Does a higher number
of GHz mean better sound quality?  I hadn't even considered that when
I was purchasing.  (In fact, if you had asked me, I would have
reported that our old phones must be 2.4 GHz.)

I was just so happy to see that over 500 reviewers gave the phone an
average rating of 4.5 stars that I figured I was done.  I read up a
bit, mostly comparing this phone to a model that was similar but
"digital," and decided that I didn't know what digital would get me,
and that I wanted 17 hours of talk time rather than 5 hours.

I didn't read up on whether the new phone had more than one voicemail
box, or what exactly I was giving up by not going "digital," or
whether the GHz was an indication of signal strength, or simply what
frequency it broadcast on, etc.


Now that I've got the network set up, I'll probably see if there's a
Panasonic that seems to stomp the one we bought, and consider doing an
exchange.

Re: How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?
wrote:

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Just in case you can't get enough on the topic of Panasonic phones,
here are the two Panasonic phones I see at Amazon that are probably a
little better than our new one.

Ours:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)

$15 more and "digital":
(Amazon.com product link shortened)

$30 more and "titanium":
(Amazon.com product link shortened)


These other two models offer some features that ours don't:

- talking caller ID, which I hear is actually handy
- call block, which would help with any callers who bug us repeatedly
- backlit keypads
- phone book stored in base (rather than in each handset)
- programmable night mode (certain phones won't ring during certain
hours)
- Clarity Booster ("combines two voice paths helping the handset to
improve clarity in an area where there may otherwise be interference")

I can't be sure if "Clarity Booster," or any of the other features
mean better sound or not, but the features themselves sound good
enough that we should probably upgrade, if we don't mind the shipping
hassle.

They all use the latest "Dect 6.0" technology.  I don't know if that's
good or not.
They're all 1.9 GHz, rather than 5.8 GHz.  I don't know if that's bad
or not.

Re: How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?
wrote:

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Worth its weight in gold if you ever try to dial where there is not
lots of light!!!!!!!!

I _really_ miss this feature as its missing from my current home
phone.

Re: How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?
dgates wrote:

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the GHZ says what frequency it works on, not usually a major problem, but
they used to use the same freq's (2.4 GHZ) as networks, some are still sold
at that freq, and sometimes caused errors in wireless networks, and
interference with tivo wireless g's.....

just an aside, something I found sort of handy, some have headset jacks
(work with some of the same headsets/earpeices for cell phones).. nice to be
able to put it in your pocket and still talk hands free while you
cook/clean/watch tv/putter...

At any rate (Another aside) they now make combo cell/wifi phones, since you
are movin on up in technology, thought you may be looking at those (new app
for iphone does cell when away from net, voip when network
available/connected... you (I think/I forget a lot) mentioned something
about already having iphones, thought you may have checked out that app)



Re: How to boost our Linksys WRT150N's signal -- across the house?

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The best phones are digital spread spectrum.
I use and recommend Panasonic Gigarange.
Some of the analog and basic digital phones are pretty bad.
Be sure any cordless phones are not on 2.4 GHz,
or they can cause serious grief with your Wi-Fi.

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