How many computers (sequentially) can a Windows license be re-used

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I have a Microsoft store-bought version of Windows 7 professional.
It was installed on once machine, which was retired; and then on another.
I'm about to retire the second machine, which had to be activated by telephone
when I activated it last (as it was a totally different machine than the
original one).

I'd like to use the Windows 7 Pro on another machine (and I'll put WinXP
on the current machine - so it will be a swap - but that's not the question).

The question is whether there is a limit to the NUMBER of machines that
SEQUENTIALLY can have the same product key.

To clarify, there will NEVER be more than one machine with the same product
key at the same time. The question is simply whether there is a limit to  
the NUMBER of machines that used the license, over time?


Re: How many computers (sequentially) can a Windows license be re-used
On 8/24/2013 1:34 PM, Eddie Powalski wrote:
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If it is the Windows 7 retail version, there is no expiration on the
number of times the particular product key can be used for a Windows 7
installation.  However, the only restriction is that this key can only
be applied to just one Win7 installation at a time, i.e., no concurrent
installation, including a virtual machine.

For the Windows 7 OEM ("system builder") install, its product key can
only be applied to the system with which it was built and restricted
permanently to that system.

Note that if the purchased Windows 7 Professional is an upgrade install
and not a full-install, then the Windows XP install going into the old
machine cannot be the qualifying OS.

I think this covers all of the fine points.

GR

Re: How many computers (sequentially) can a Windows license be re-used
On Sat, 24 Aug 2013 14:38:53 -0700, Ghostrider <" wrote:

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It's a full retail version!  
So, that is good news.
The gist is that I can put it on as many machines, sequentially,
as I like.
Thanks!


Re: How many computers (sequentially) can a Windows license be re-used
On Sat, 24 Aug 2013 23:08:04 +0000 (UTC), Eddie Powalski wrote:

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Actually, you can install the retail version on as many machines as you
want, that you own.
If you were to install that item on machines owned by friends, and M$ sees
them operating from several locations, then that is a violation.
Then again, M$ may see it as a violation if you are using two machines with
the same license and key at the same time.

Re: How many computers (sequentially) can a Windows license be re-used
On Sat, 24 Aug 2013 18:10:04 -0700, richard wrote:

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Now that's interesting.

I have the box in front of me. It says:
 Windows 7 Ultimate
 Microsoft Company Store Purchase
 Do not lend or make illegal copies.
 32-bit software (and 64-bit software)

There is a proof of license card, with a product key, which says
"Label not to be sold separately".

There is also an orange booklet for Windows 7, and an upgrade card.
But the actual license terms don't appear to be printed.

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Hmm... doesn't that contradict your first statement that I can
use it on any number of machines that I own at one location?


Re: How many computers (sequentially) can a Windows license be re-used
On Sun, 25 Aug 2013 04:09:16 +0000 (UTC), Eddie Powalski wrote:

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No. I'm just saying don't be online with more than two at the same time.
They will know how many machines are online through your MAC address.

Re: How many computers (sequentially) can a Windows license be re-used
On Sat, 24 Aug 2013 23:15:09 -0500, richard wrote:

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I don't think a MAC address makes it through the router.
Does it?

Plus, you can set all your PCs to have the same MAC address if you like.
Right?


Re: How many computers (sequentially) can a Windows license be re-used
On Sun, 25 Aug 2013 00:41:56 -0400, Paul wrote:

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I wonder if they really use the NIC address because that can be  
trivially easily spoofed with freeware...

I looked at their privacy statement, and it didn't say:
 http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?Linkid=104609


Re: How many computers (sequentially) can a Windows license be re-used
Eddie Powalski wrote:
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This is the only article I have on Activation.

http://aumha.org/win5/a/wpa.htm

The MAC is stored in hardware somewhere, which is where
the computer gets the value when booted for the first
time. Some motherboards, the BIOS flasher has a
command line option to change the value, but not
all motherboards do that. My NVidia Nforce2 based
motherboard, is the only one I have where the MAC
can be changed via the BIOS flasher. And retail
motherboards, sometimes have a sticker with the MAC
printed on it, in case the hardware value ever needs
to be corrected (by say, the factory).

Not many boards, allow this sort of thing...

http://vip.asus.com/forum/view.aspx?SLanguage=en-us&id=20080226233500937&board_id=1&model=A7V8X-X&page=1&count=17

This topic doesn't seem to be documented very
well, and perhaps that is on purpose.

    Paul

Re: How many computers (sequentially) can a Windows license be re-used
On Sun, 25 Aug 2013 09:59:46 -0400, Paul wrote:

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Why not just change the MAC address in freeware software?
http://www.mydigitallife.info/how-to-change-or-spoof-mac-address-in-windows-xp-vista-server-20032008-mac-os-x-unix-and-linux/
http://www.zokali.com/win7-mac-address-changer/
http://www.softpedia.com/get/Tweak/Network-Tweak/MAC-Address-Changer.shtml
http://www.addictivetips.com/windows-tips/change-mac-address-in-windows-7-with-win7-mac-changer/
etc.


Re: How many computers (sequentially) can a Windows license be re-used
Eddie Powalski wrote:
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http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/it-security/how-to-spoof-a-mac-address/

    "MS Windows: On Microsoft Windows systems, the MAC address is stored
     in a registry key. The location of that key varies from one
     MS Windows version to the next, but find that and you can
     just edit it yourself."

The OS can probe for the "burned in hardware value", when
doing a WPA check. I don't think the spoof software you
quote, will fix that. It's for changing the MAC which is
stored in some intermediate location. Windows WPA won't be
reading a registry key for this. They're not that dumb.

*******

And the hard drive serial number, the hard drive manufacturer
doesn't want you to change that. (They check the serial, when
determining whether your warranty claim is valid.) So they're
not going to leave that out in the open. It's probably
not "burned in hardware" and ultra-secure - you might need to
overwrite "track -1" to get at it. Just a guess. "Track -1"
contains the body of the drive firmware and data structures.
And it just might have the serial as well. Using the firmware
flasher, should not be overwriting where the serial is stored.
As far as I know, there is some provision in the ATA/ATAPI
spec for updating firmware. And it's not likely to trash
other areas of storage.

Even if you did a Secure Erase of the drive, it should not
touch the serial number.

    Paul

Re: How many computers (sequentially) can a Windows license be re-used
On Sun, 25 Aug 2013 12:11:39 -0300, nemesis wrote:

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This makes no sense to me - but maybe I'm missing something.
First, what's a "MB" number?
Second, a MAC address, on both Linux & Windows, is trivial to change.
It's also trivial to change a MAC address on (most) routers.

I have no idea how to change the hard drive serial number though.

Can it be done with freeware?


Re: How many computers (sequentially) can a Windows license be re-used
wrote:

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No, not by normal networking means, but nothing prevents an application from
picking up the MAC and transporting it as data to a distant endpoint. Maybe
that's what richard is talking about, but I don't know.

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You could, but if they're on the same LAN you won't get very far. Duplicate
MAC addresses will prevent intra-LAN communication.


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