Enlighten the non-telephony savvy

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Hello group!

I ran across a peculiar situation.  Hopefully, I can describe it well
enough in a newsgroup post...

I was working on a site where some electricians had done the network and
telephone cabling.  All of the CAT5 network cabling terminated into a
cabinet which used a patch panel.  From the patch panel, there were
small patch cables connecting each live port on the panel to their
switch.  All of that seemed normal.  However, to one side of the patch
panel was a plastic box of some type.  It took in two CAT5 cables on the
front and then had some cabling come out of the back of it.  I am
guessing that they doubled up one of the cable runs to actually wire two
jacks and were using this box to split the line back into two lines
which could be connected to the switch.  Would this make sense on CAT5
for an ethernet LAN?  Is this the best way when there were open ports on
the patch panel?

Thanks for any info -- just curious about why this was done this way.

Jonathan

Re: Enlighten the non-telephony savvy


Jonathan Roberts wrote:
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How big was the plastic box?  Were there any kind of markings on it?

Take care,
Rich

God bless the USA

--
My parents thought I was a real wit, and they were half right.

                                               --source unknown

Re: Enlighten the non-telephony savvy


Rich Piehl wrote:
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It was not very big.  Roughly the size of a 'standard' rectangular
telephone jack (maybe 3x4 inches).  It had two ports instead of one
though.  I didn't notice any markings but there may have been some.

Thanks for the response,
Jonathan

Re: Enlighten the non-telephony savvy


Jonathan Roberts wrote:
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Hard to say what it was.  But have, on occasions where the patch panel
is full and the customer wasn't going to purchase a new one, terminated
new cat 5 runs to a cat 5 jack and put it in a surface mount box on the
backboard.  Not the best way, but functional.

Take care,
Rich

God bless the USA


--
My parents thought I was a real wit, and they were half right.

                                               --source unknown

Re: Enlighten the non-telephony savvy


Rich Piehl wrote:
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Thanks, Rich!

Re: Enlighten the non-telephony savvy


Jonathan Roberts wrote:


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My guess would be - they needed to split the cable but did not want to use
two patch panel ports for that. It makes for a non-standard solution and
so it was not certified by the installer and was best to be kept separate
from the rest of the system that's probably certified and warranted.
You can do the split for two Ethernet connections (here is the pinout:
http://www.cabling-design.com/references/pinouts/split.shtml ) but it is
much more often done for telephone.


--

Cheers!
D~
http://www.telecom-gear.com




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Re: Enlighten the non-telephony savvy


telecom-gear.com wrote:
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Thank you for the explanation and the link!

Jonathan

Re: Enlighten the non-telephony savvy


On Thu, 15 Feb 2007 21:02:57 -0600, Jonathan Roberts

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Evening Jonathan;

What you are describing seems like one of these items:

http://www.cyberguys.com/templates/searchdetail.asp?productID=2695

They can come in handy on a short term basis while you are getting
new cable/patch panels installed.  I have used them on  a couple of
day basis when I didn't have a small port density switch available to
put at the client end of the circuit.

Jeff Little

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