Yes, It's Bad. Robocalls, and Their Scams, Are Surging. [telecom]

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Yes, It's Bad. Robocalls, and Their Scams, Are Surging.

The volume of automated phone calls has skyrocketed this year over last,
according to a service that tracks them, and complaints have also risen
sharply.

Those pesky robocalls - at best annoying disturbances and at worst
costly financial scams - are getting worse.

In an age when cellphones have become extensions of our bodies,
robocallers now follow people wherever they go, disrupting business
meetings, church services and bedtime stories with their children.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/06/your-money/robocalls-rise-illegal.html

Re: Yes, It's Bad. Robocalls, and Their Scams, Are Surging. [telecom]
Per Monty Solomon:
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Does anybody know if some of the perpetrators are spoofing CallerID on a
call-by-call basis?

Last several months I have been getting more and more calls where the
CallerID is on the same exchange as my cell phone.

If so, it seems like a workable way to defeat NoMoRobo and other
crowd-sourced solutions.
--  
Pete Cresswell

Re: Yes, It's Bad. Robocalls, and Their Scams, Are Surging. [telecom]
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Almost certainly, yes.  I've noticed this pattern for roughly a year.
In particular, there's a "This is the Marriott Hotel, you've been
selected for a special deal" scammer who uses this a lot.

Certainly seems intended to help get by any "accept local calls but
reject calls from out-of-state" phonespam blockers.

Re: Yes, It's Bad. Robocalls, and Their Scams, Are Surging. [telecom]
Per Dave Platt:
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I figured it was intended to defeat crowd-sourced solutions like
NoMoRobo: spoof a different number on each call stay ahead of the
reports to the NoMoRobo DB.

--  
Pete Cresswell

Re: Yes, It's Bad. Robocalls, and Their Scams, Are Surging. [telecom]
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Yes definitely.


Like that.  These days if a call on my mobile isn't from someone in my
phone book, I don't bother to answer because it's all junx.

***** Moderator's Note *****

No! NO!! PLEASE DON'T DO THAT!!!

Sigh. (Takes deep breath, considers changing above to lower case,
decides against.)

When you get a marketing call, *please* do what I do: Take One For The
Team! *You* have already been bothered. *You* have already had your
quiet enjoyment of your day stolen. Fight Back!

There are now two layers of screening between you and the actual
salesmen whose time is valuable:

1. An auto-attendant that tries to get you to punch a digit to be
   "removed," although all the advice I've read says that it's just a
   ploy to get you to confirm that your number is valid.

2. A voice-from-India that asks you screening questions designed to
   separate the smart from the gullible. If you miss a question, they
   hang up.

IMNSHO, you should do anything it takes to get to the closer and waste
as much of his/her time as possible. Their minions have lied to you
already, and treated you like a fool - it's only fair to return the
favor. Trust me on this: they LOVE folks who don't answer, because
that means that they are statistically that much closer to finding a
mark.

There are websites which will generate a "valid" credit card number
that will pass the checksum test. When they say they want to "qualify"
you, give them one of those numbers. When they say the charge didn't
go through, ask them what the hell they're doing trying to charge the  
card when they say they were going to "validate" you. Just remember
NEVER to say "Yes," since I've read reports of some con artists
excerpting that one word and pasting it into a "conversation" where
you "gave consent" to be charged. Instead of "yes," reply "tell me
more, " or "how much does it cost, again?" Etc., Etc.

The object is simple: waste as much of the saledroid's time as
possible. If even a small percentage of victims fight back, the whole
industry will be bankrupt inside a year. You can smile and know that
*you* helped to make it happen!

Or, if that seems too far out there for your taste (it's OK: going 15
rounds with an experienced boiler-room operator isn't for everyone),
you can pick up a pen and paper (it has GOT to be a handwritten note!
Trust me on this!), and write your Congressman and demand that (s)he
get of his/her butt and pass legislation against caller-id spoofing
that has real teeth in it.

Either way, you'll make a difference. Take One For The Team!

Bill Horne
Moderator

Re: Yes, It's Bad. Robocalls, and Their Scams, Are Surging. [telecom]

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I've noticed the same thing. These days I mostly get robocalls on my  
cellphone. Most are in the same exchange, and many of the others are in  
the same area code.

--  
Barry Margolin, barmar@alum.mit.edu
Arlington, MA
*** PLEASE post questions in newsgroups, not directly to me ***

Re: Yes, It's Bad. Robocalls, and Their Scams, Are Surging. [telecom]
On Thursday, May 10, 2018 at 11:50:51 AM UTC-4, Barry Margolin wrote:

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Would anyone know accurately what the current laws are regarding all
unsolicited phone calls?

It was my understanding that unsolicited calls of _any_ type were
prohibited to cell phones and nursing homes because of the cost and
disruption they cause.  There may have been other protected recipients
as well.  I know a number of people who have pay-as-you-go cell phones
and such calls cost them money*.

It was also my understanding that commercial sellers were prohibited
from using the do-not-call list for cold calls.  However, it seems
that law now seems to be disregarded.

Sadly, the do-not-call law exempted political calls, survey calls, and
non-profit calls.  Personally, I get tons of those on my landline.
Indeed, now that it is election season, I get several polling and
candidate calls every day.  A nuisance.

Personally, I usually have my cellphone off, but when it is on, I am
getting unsolicited calls.  One had an obviously spoofed area code
"023".

* Some people suggest merely not answering an incoming call if the
number is not known.  But that is a bad solution because:
  
1) As we know, caller-ID is widely spoofed.
  
2) An incoming come from an unknown number may be legitimate, indeed,
   even an urgent call.  For example, it could be from an health care
   provider or a business about a matter that has come up.  Or, it
   could be a friend or family member in a difficult situation where
   they had to borrow someone else's phone.  A lot of people find
   themselves with a dead cell phone battery or lost handset when they
   need the phone the most.
  
3) A person sleeping or otherwise indisposed is still disturbed by an
   incoming call.  They have to check the caller ID (assuming the
   telephone set has caller-ID and a lot of older sets still in use do
   not have it).  If a person has an elder parent, they must answer
   all incoming calls just in case there is an emergency--for
   instance, suppose a parent's neighbor is calling to report a
   problem.

Re: Yes, It's Bad. Robocalls, and Their Scams, Are Surging. [telecom]
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If you were in a call center in Jamaca, Bangladesh, etc., how worried would you
be about USA phone laws?

Times have changed.

--  
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
| Brian Gordon     -->briang.remove-this@and-this-too.panix.com<--     brian dot gordon at cox dot net |
+ bgordon@aol.com                                      Bass: NSC Frank Thorne +
+--------------------------------------------------------------+

Re: Yes, It's Bad. Robocalls, and Their Scams, Are Surging. [telecom]

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That's what I have. So I rarely answer these calls.

My understanding is similar to yours, but I also realize that the  
perpetrators are most likely offshore, so prosecuting them is close to  
impossible. There presumably has to be a domestic company that takes the  
money, but tracing things back to them is too much work for most victims  
of robocalls.

--  
Barry Margolin, barmar@alum.mit.edu
Arlington, MA
*** PLEASE post questions in newsgroups, not directly to me ***

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