Re: [telecom] New Jersey gets new area code

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Why do telcos. insist on doing overlays? They sound like such a pain. They are
contrary to everything the Bell System desired in the PSTN.

I am fortunate enough to live in the 262 area code, which was a split from 414
about 25 or so years ago. If you look in the old phone books, the older
prefixes, such as (262) 542-xxxx were once (414) 542-xxxx. The numbers
themselves did not change, only the area code, so there was absolutely no
impact when the 262 area code since the area code you are in generally does
not matter to you.

Why not split area codes instead of overlay them? Everyone can keep their
number and the area is still split. Geographically, area codes fail to have
meaning if they are overlaid and, furthermore, they require 10 digit dialing,
which is a huge pain from a rotary phone!
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Re: [telecom] New Jersey gets new area code
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Except they don't.  When your number moved from 414 into 262 everyone
in the new 262 area had to tell all their friends outside the 262 area
that their numbers had changed.  There may be a few people who still
never call anyone outside their home town, but for everyone else, it's
a significant pain.  With overlays, nobody's number changes.

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Uh, since the boundaries haven't changed, they mean exactly what they
meant all along.  The meaning of 212 didn't change when they overlaid
626 on it.  It's still Manhattan.

R's,
John

PS:

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Ah, well.

--  
Regards,
John Levine, johnl@iecc.com, Primary Perpetrator of "The Internet for Dummies",
Please consider the environment before reading this e-mail. https://jl.ly

Re: New Jersey gets new area code [telecom]
 > Date: 4 Aug 2018 17:49:08 -0000
 > Subject: Re: [telecom] New Jersey gets new area code
 >
 > In article
 >  
 >
 > > Why not split area codes instead of overlay them? Everyone can keep
 > their number ...
 >
 > Except they don't.  When your number moved from 414 into 262 everyone
 > in the new 262 area had to tell all their friends outside the 262 area
 > that their numbers had changed.  There may be a few people who still
 > never call anyone outside their home town, but for everyone else, it's
 > a significant pain.  With overlays, nobody's number changes.
 >
 > Geographically, area codes fail to have meaning if they are overlaid ...
 >
 > Uh, since the boundaries haven't changed, they mean exactly what they
 > meant all along.  The meaning of 212 didn't change when they overlaid
 > 626 on it.  It's still Manhattan.

I was at the California PUC meeting to discuss the 415-650 split (many
years ago).  Stanford University pointed out that their catalogs were
in high school libraries around the country, and were often not
refreshed for many years.  At least one security contractor said that
he would have to go out to every single property (and he had thousands)
and re-program every dial-out device.  PUC did the split anyway,  
promising us at least ten years of stability (big deal!).

Two years later, they were back to request another split.  I went to
that meeting, and after hearing their arguments, I told them that even
though the many competing phone companies did not want to tell the
public how many lines they needed, the PUC had a right to that
information, and all those companies who needed less than ten lines in
an office could split a single block of 10,000 lines rather than giving
them 10,000 lines each.  They cancelled the split, and we have not heard
anything about another split or overlay for 650 since.

Mark Kaminsky

New Jersey gets new area code [telecom]
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I vigorously disagree.

Unlike a split, with an overlay no one has to surrender their number for  
a new one. They keep it, period.

With an split, the border is often politically contentious. Are *you*  
still part of Gotham City, or now labeled some suburban type?
(NYC: when Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island were forced into 718.)

Making splits requires predicting which parts will grow faster, and  
which slower. Otherwise you soon split again.

With an overlay, the initial overlay is the hard-to-adjust event. When  
you overlay another, it's a yawn. In Maryland, 443 overlaid 410 in 1997.
In 2012, 667 was also added; no one blinked.

By contrast, splitting into smaller and smaller areas gets worse each  
time. Look up the history of 312; originally, it covered 16,000^2 miles.  
Three splits later, it's about five miles^2.

AND

The only "pain" of an overlay is 10D dialing. I don't know where to find  
a cellphone using Millennial who knows how to dial 7D.

***** Moderator's Note *****

I do! I DO!! I even know how to dial 5D!

Oh, wait a minute ...

Sorry, wrong millennium.

Bill Horne
Moderator

Re: New Jersey gets new area code [telecom]
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My daughter certainly does.  Our area code 607 was one of the earlier
splits, hacked out of 315 and 716 in 1954, and we've been snoozing
ever since.  (We proudly call ourselves Centrally Isolated.)

All 607 exchanges have 7D dialing, even the mobile ones, even though
the area is split between two LATAs, so the price for a 7D call from
a landline might be free (local), cheap (intra-LATA toll) or fairly
cheap (inter-LATA toll.)

The NANPA exhaust analysis says we will never need an overlay.  So there.

R's,
John

***** Moderator's Note *****

John, I envy you: here in western North Carolina, most landlines can
dial 7D, but cellphones have to dial 10D, and it's very common to see
phone numbers advertised without the "828" area code. Not only does
this confuse many new arrivals who bring cell phones, but if there's
ever an overlay here, there'll be a meltdown.

Bill Horne
Moderator

Re: New Jersey gets new area code [telecom]
On Monday, August 6, 2018 at 11:58:15 AM UTC-4, David wrote:

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When electronic switching came along in the early 1980s, some small
towns then lost their ability to dial only five digits for local
calls.  Earlier in this newsgroup Neal gave an excellent explanation
of absorbers.

https://groups.google.com/forum /#!searchin/comp.dcom.telecom/absorb%7Csort:date/comp.dcom.telecom/XoQ_43x9j48/iV-AYYHx4w4J

Fast forward to today, it seems most callers have cell phones which
require ten digit dialing and also have speed call, so the ten digit
dialing is not a burden.

I still have a rotary phone and the ten digits are a pain.  But I
mostly use a Touch Tone phone for outgoing calls.

Indeed, I wonder, today how many rotary-pulse calls are offered to
telephone exchanges.  I also wonder how long they'll be accepted.

***** Moderator's Note *****

I'd guess "forever" - the switch vendors have already sunk all the
costs for development and marketing, so they'll be very reluctant to
remove features that are still in use and for which they collect
royalties every year.

In addition, I doubt ANY politician would allow any change that might
cause some voter to be cut off form 911 or their doctor. All things
considered, I believe that the "500" set will be usable for the
foreseeable future.

Bill Horne
Moderator

Re: New Jersey gets new area code [telecom]
On 8/6/2018 12:25 PM, HAncock4 wrote:

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My cell phones don't require 10 digit dialing. Same with my VoIP,  
though I have no way to know what happens once the dialing gets on the  
other side of the VoIP server.

But we don't have overlays. I believe whether 10 are required or not  
depends on your state's PUC. If there are overlays, there will be a  
lot of political pressure (from the "new" LEC) to require 10 for all  
calls so they won't be at a disadvantage.

Re: New Jersey gets new area code [telecom]
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NANPA has reports on their web site at www.nanpa.com.  At this point
they estimate that 406 will fill up in the 3rd quarter of 2029.

R's,
John

P.S.: perhaps you could consider getting a touch tone phone between
now and then.

Re: New Jersey gets new area code [telecom]
Message-ID: <BYAPR13MB2232B81BEC622BB653EE437091260@BYAPR13MB2232.namprd13.prod.outlook.com

wrote:

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See "LincMad's New Area Code Dates" page:

https://www.lincmad.com/areacode.html

Area code 406 is not listed implying that it is not in jeopardy.

Wikipedia doesn't mention any relief activity in 406.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Area_code_406

Neal McLain
Brazoria, Texas

Re: New Jersey gets new area code [telecom]
Here is another article, this from the Phila Inqr.  It includes a map
of NJ area codes and counties.

http://www.philly.com/philly/news/new_jersey/new-area-code-south-jersey-dialing-procedures-20180815.html

Subject: Re: New Jersey gets new area code [telecom]
Naveen Albert wrote:

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Telcos don't make the split-vs.-overlay decisions; the state regu-
latory agency does.  In the case of Wisconsin that's the Public
Service Commission.  
https://psc.wi.gov/Pages/Home.aspx

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It matters a lot if you're a business with customers outside of your
local area.  I attended the public hearing when the PSC was
considering the overlay-v.-split question for 920.  One participant,
owner of a personnel-recruitment firm ("headhunter") for the
hospitality industry was concerned that a split would change the area
code of his company, resulting in possible loss of customers.  Another
participant, the board chairman of the Town of Oconomowoc, was
concerned that the proposed split line would split the town.

Although I didn't attend the public hearing, the entire argument
played out again when the 414-262 split was considered.  That split
essentially reduced the size of 414 to Milwaukee county.  If 414 ever
needs relief I predict that it will be an overlay, not another split.

Here is a link to an article I wrote about the 414-262 split:

http://www.sbe24.org/archives/newsletters/ltrs1999/apr99.pdf

The same argument continues to this day.  Here is a link to an article
about the overlay-v.-split question for 715 and 920.
http://www.sbe24.org/archives/newsletters/ltrs2009/jan09.pdf

The overlay on 715 (534) has been implemented.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Area_codes_715_and_534

Apparently the overlay on 920 (274) is still pending.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Area_code_274

Neal McLain
Brazoria, Texas

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