Re: Caller ID is my own name/number? [telecom]

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On Thu, Apr 23, 2015 at 03:06:53PM -0400, Retired wrote:
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To get you to answer the phone: after all, your own name and number
are a lot more familiar to you than anyone else's, and so sending it
to you makes it more likely that some people will answer the phone
because they assume the display is showing their info for a reason.

I suggest you write to your Congressman and Senators, and tell them
that you want them to pass a law making it illegal to falsify Caller
ID information.

Bill

--  
Bill Horne
(Remove QRM from my address to write to me directly)

Re: Caller ID is my own name/number? [telecom]
On Thu, Apr 23, 2015 at 04:07:27PM -0700, Duncan Smith wrote:
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[snip]

Well, I am not a lawyer, so I can't argue the law. However, I doubt  
that the current law(s) have any meaningful teeth in them, or the
problem wouldn't be occuring.  

Bill

--  
Bill Horne
(Remove QRM from my address to write to me directly)

Re: Caller ID is my own name/number? [telecom]
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On 2015-04-23 16:18, Bill Horne wrote:
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The problem is that the average person receiving a call with faked CID
has no way to find out where the call actually came from, nor even to
give that info to law enforcement.  The Custom Calling feature Call
Trace is supposed to do the latter, but every telco I know about refuses
to do their part of the job, since they regard junk calls of all types
as paying traffic and refuse to cooperate in stopping it.

Thus, if there's any law whose passage can help, it needs to be directed
at compelling the victim's dial tone provider to cooperate in the
tracing process -- or possibly at compelling telcos that serve
businesses to authenticate (and if necessary change) the caller ID the
business's PBX sends out.

Re: Caller ID is my own name/number? [telecom]
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To be fair, we haven't determined whether the OP was called by someone
"with the intent to defraud, cause harm, or wrongfully obtain anything
of value".  Once we determine that, then we know if the call was
illegal.

Denver
http://ossguy.com/

Re: Caller ID is my own name/number? [telecom]
On Friday, April 24, 2015 at 12:03:47 PM UTC-4, Denver Gingerich wrote:
  
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Actually, by providing a false caller-ID, the caller indeed act wrongly.

A business that posts a sign "established" 1965 when in fact the business
is only a year old is lying.  It may be a minor lie, but it still is a
false statement of fact.

* * * * *

On Friday, April 24, 2015 at 12:03:47 PM UTC-4, John Reiser wrote:

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Actually, telephone soliciting in violation of the Do Not Call laws _is_
indeed illegal.

Re: Caller ID is my own name/number? [telecom]
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By itself, soliciting to induce a sale of goods or services is not fraud,
does not cause harm, nor seek to obtain wrongfully something of value;
and thus is not prohibited by that law.  Often it is called "advertising."

Re: Caller ID is my own name/number? [telecom]
:>> [fake CallerID] is ALREADY against the law.  What can passing more laws accomplish?
:>>
:>> Specifically, the Truth in Caller ID Act of 2009, aka Public Law
:>> 111-331

:By itself, soliciting to induce a sale of goods or services is not fraud,
:does not cause harm, nor seek to obtain wrongfully something of value;
:and thus is not prohibited by that law.  Often it is called "advertising."

Sending me fake CID so I answer the phone obtains something of value:
my time.  

--  
sig 15

Re: Caller ID is my own name/number? [telecom]
Per Bill Horne:
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The lame-sounding letters I get from the Pennsylvania Att'y General's
office explaining why they can't do anything about No-Call List
violations any more all cite movement to offshore locations and use of
VOIP by telemarketers.
--  
Pete Cresswell

Re: Caller ID is my own name/number? [telecom]
On Thu, Apr 23, 2015 at 06:44:26PM -0400, Bill Horne wrote:
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It's ALREADY against the law.  What can passing more laws accomplish?

Specifically, the Truth in Caller ID Act of 2009, aka Public Law
111-331, says:

111-331> It shall be unlawful for any person within the United States,
111-331> in connection with any telecommunications service or
111-331> IP-enabled voice service, to cause any caller identification
111-331> service to knowingly transmit misleading or inaccurate caller
111-331> identification information with the intent to defraud, cause
111-331> harm, or wrongfully obtain anything of value, unless such
111-331> transmission is exempted pursuant to paragraph (3)(B).

Read this at <https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/111/s30/text , or
the entirety of 47 USC sec 227 at
<https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/47/227 .

Duncan Smith

Re: Caller ID is my own name/number? [telecom]
On Thu, 23 Apr 2015 16:07:27 -0700, Duncan Smith wrote:

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I think the situation described does not fit that legislation -
someone is causing a caller identification service to UN-knowingly
transmit misleading/innacurate caller identification information.

Re: Caller ID is my own name/number? [telecom]
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(a) put teeth in it, (b) make it a crime unto itself, and (c) allow
private lawsuits.

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I propose a different law:

It shall be unlawful for any person within the United States, in
connection with any telecommunications service or IP-enabled voice
service, to cause any caller identification service to knowingly
(that's the *person* knowing, not the *service* knowing) transmit
misleading or inaccurate caller identification information for any or
none of the following reasons:

    (a) as a joke, or
    (b) not as a joke, or
    (c) for free, or
    (d) for pay, or
    (e) to cause the recipient to answer the phone, or
    (f) to cause the recipient to not answer the phone, or
    (g) to attempt sell a product or service, or
    (h) to attempt to communicate advertising, or
    (i) to attempt solicit a donation or contribution, or
    (j) to attempt to get the recipient to vote, or to vote in
        a particular way,
    (k) to impersonate any person, including government authorities
        or the recipient him/her self, or
    (l) to impersonate a non-law-enforcement-officer (cops beware!), or
    (m) to prove you could do it, or
    (n) to prove you could not do it, or
    (o) to collect a debt, or
    (p) to not collect a debt

The minimum penalty shall be $1,000 multiplied by the number of calls
raised to the 10th power, and doubled for each clause (a) thru (p)
that applies, plus confiscation of any telephone equipment owned or
leased by the offender.

Anyone receiving a call with forged caller-id may sue for 10% of the
penalty, with the remainder going to the state.

It shall be illegal for a person convicted of the crime above to
attempt to originate a phone call from anywhere (*NO* exception for
other countries) to a destination other than 911 (*NO* exception for
countries where the emergency number is other than '911') for a period
of one year times the number of phone calls made (during which time
the offender is on probation and should not be allowed to leave the
country anyway).

Re: Caller ID is my own name/number? [telecom]

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I use Viatalk VoIP.  Its control panel allows me to deal with inbound  
calls in a variety of ways.

Whenever I get a scammer, I immediately go in and have that number  
redirected to my US senator's office.

Should they call again, they'll go to him, not me.

Re: Caller ID is my own name/number? [telecom]
Per Elmo P. Shagnasty:
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That, I *like* !.....

How many button presses/keystrokes does it take per call?
--  
Pete Cresswell

Re: Caller ID is my own name/number? [telecom]

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Well, I have to log into my provider and spend an annoying 30 seconds  
doing it.

But occasionally I go to my call logs to look for a call that's been  
redirected--and occasionally I see one.  So I do get a smile out of it  
if nothing else.

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