Outdoor camera connections.

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I have an installation of outdoor cameras on a brick building coming up. It
's a nice looking building and I'd like some ideas for mounting the cameras
 and find out how you-all are terminating the camera connections. On other  
jobs that I've done I've used treated wood either screwed or masonary naile
d to the cement block and used a weather proof 4X4 plastic box for the conn
ections. All mounted to a smooth cement brick surface. Really commercial an
d not necessary to be "pretty".

This next job has colored unevenly textured bricks which is going to be har
d to attach a board to evenly and a anyway ...... a piece of treated wood a
nd a grey plastic box isn't going to look too good on the front of this nic
e building.  
I'll be using bullet cameras and the connection leads are only about a foot
 long. I presently use compression fittings for the wires going into the bo
x and caulk the wire hole through the wall. I'll be using baluns so I need  
the box.

Any suggestions?  

Re: Outdoor camera connections.
Try  some of these..   work  good on some types of cameras..
You can add different extension rings or plates  for the different camera  
styles

http://www.aifittings.com/catalog/communications/security-camera-mounting-boxes/


RTS




"Jim"  wrote in message  

I have an installation of outdoor cameras on a brick building coming up.  
It's a nice looking building and I'd like some ideas for mounting the  
cameras and find out how you-all are terminating the camera connections. On  
other jobs that I've done I've used treated wood either screwed or masonary  
nailed to the cement block and used a weather proof 4X4 plastic box for the  
connections. All mounted to a smooth cement brick surface. Really commercial  
and not necessary to be "pretty".

This next job has colored unevenly textured bricks which is going to be hard  
to attach a board to evenly and a anyway ...... a piece of treated wood and  
a grey plastic box isn't going to look too good on the front of this nice  
building.
I'll be using bullet cameras and the connection leads are only about a foot  
long. I presently use compression fittings for the wires going into the box  
and caulk the wire hole through the wall. I'll be using baluns so I need the  
box.

Any suggestions?  


Re: Outdoor camera connections.
On Wednesday, March 20, 2013 10:01:46 AM UTC-4, RockyTSquirrel wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
erent extension rings or plates for the different camera styles http://www.
aifittings.com/catalog/communications/security-camera-mounting-boxes/ RTS
  


Thanks Rocky. I'll have to look more closely at their product line and mayb
e even a phone call. At first glance I didn't see anything for mounting a b
ullet camera or a little bit bigger box that would hold the cable, connecto
rs and a balun and I'm still wondering about how to keep this all looking n
ice mounting it on the uneven surface of the brickface. What the problem wi
th the box is...... the strain relief on the connector end of the camera ca
bles is so thick that the cables bend radius added to the length of the con
nectors and balun requires a larger box. At least 4 x 4. Then I also need a
n 1/2 or 3/4 inch hole in the box for a watertight fitting.

Anyway, thanks for the lead. I'll be following up.

If anyone eles has any more suggestions ......... ? Especially with the mou
nting of the camera on the uneven surface of the brickface.

Re: Outdoor camera connections.

On Wednesday, March 20, 2013 10:01:46 AM UTC-4, RockyTSquirrel wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
http://www.aifittings.com/catalog/communications/security-camera-mounting-boxes /
 
Quoted text here. Click to load it


Thanks Rocky. I'll have to look more closely at their product line and maybe  
even a phone call. At first glance I didn't see anything for mounting a  
bullet camera or a little bit bigger box that would hold the cable,  
connectors and a balun and I'm still wondering about how to keep this all  
looking nice mounting it on the uneven surface of the brickface. What the  
problem with the box is...... the strain relief on the connector end of the  
camera cables is so thick that the cables bend radius added to the length of  
the connectors and balun requires a larger box. At least 4 x 4. Then I also  
need an 1/2 or 3/4 inch hole in the box for a watertight fitting.

Anyway, thanks for the lead. I'll be following up.

If anyone eles has any more suggestions ......... ? Especially with the  
mounting of the camera on the uneven surface of the brickface.



Jim,

Tough problem.  Not going to be easy but if you can chisel and/or grind off  
a flat spot on your rough surface large enough for your 4x4 box to sit flat  
on top of your penetration hole in the wall.  Plastic box can be painted to  
best match the wall color but you need to use the right paint.  Be sure to  
caulk well around the box against the box.

Good luck.

Les





Re: Outdoor camera connections.
On Wednesday, March 20, 2013 4:12:14 PM UTC-4, ABLE1 wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

 Tough problem. Not going to be easy but if you can chisel and/or grind off
 a flat spot on your rough surface large enough for your 4x4 box to sit fla
t on top of your penetration hole in the wall. Plastic box can be painted t
o best match the wall color but you need to use the right paint. Be sure to
 caulk well around the box against the box. Good luck. Les

Thanks Les,
I've been thinking about it and today I thought about buying some duct-seal
 and putting it on the back of a piece of Azek or PVC decking and just scre
wing it to the wall. The weather wouldn't affect the board and the duct-sea
l would steady the board and would "space it" too.  Duct-seal wouldn't dry  
out and it would keep the board steady. I thought about epoxy on the back o
f the board also but I'd be concerned about controling the epoxy so it didn
't run down the building before it dried. I'm thinking that there's all kin
ds of "caulking" stuff out there too. I'll have to take a look next time I'
m at Home Depot. Maybe just simple construction cement would work too.  

Any other suggestions are welcome.


Re: Outdoor camera connections.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
 off a flat spot on your rough surface large enough for your 4x4 box to sit
 flat on top of your penetration hole in the wall. Plastic box can be paint
ed to best match the wall color but you need to use the right paint. Be sur
e to caulk well around the box against the box. Good luck. Les
Quoted text here. Click to load it
al and putting it on the back of a piece of Azek or PVC decking and just sc
rewing it to the wall. The weather wouldn't affect the board and the duct-s
eal would steady the board and would "space it" too.  Duct-seal wouldn't  
dry out and it would keep the board steady. I thought about epoxy on the ba
ck of the board also but I'd be concerned about controling the epoxy so it  
didn't run down the building before it dried. I'm thinking that there's all
 kinds of "caulking" stuff out there too. I'll have to take a look next tim
e I'm at Home Depot. Maybe just simple construction cement would work too.
Quoted text here. Click to load it

If the brick wall is that nice, don't do anything that permanently
mars it, except for the feed hole. Instead take a mold of the surface
with that conformal foam, like they use in packing. That stuff is like
a squishy pad. You would make it flat on the outside mounting surface
and a 'perfect' fit on the inside towards the wall. If you want, you
could make it rigid using expandable fill-foam, cut to shape, then use
a thin sealant between the two. Then there's the fibre glass epoxy
method, too. That's used in boats so would be water proof and last a
while.

Re: Outdoor camera connections.
Quoted text here. Click to load it

I see somebody has started to think outside the box a little bit for camera  
mounting.


  


Re: Outdoor camera connections.
On Thursday, March 28, 2013 2:25:40 PM UTC-4, Bob La Londe wrote:
 If the brick wall is that nice, don't do anything that permanently > mars  
it, except for the feed hole. Instead take a mold of the surface > with tha
t conformal foam, like they use in packing. That stuff is like > a squishy  
pad. You would make it flat on the outside mounting surface > and a 'perfec
t' fit on the inside towards the wall. If you want, you > could make it rig
id using expandable fill-foam, cut to shape, then use > a thin sealant betw
een the two. Then there's the fibre glass epoxy > method, too. That's used  
in boats so would be water proof and last a > while. I see somebody has sta
rted to think outside the box a little bit for camera mounting.

As I said, years ago, on commercial jobs, the mounts were always on flat su
rface. No fancy brickwork. I wonder what the companies that do commercial i
nstalls on regular basis use nowdays. I'm thinking they just screw the brac
kets to the brick however they land and use the adjustments on the mounts t
o align the camera. Me? I'm to frickin fussy .... I guess.  

I've even thought about renting a carbide disk cutter to flatten out a smal
l section of the brick. That's what the Binford people on Tool Time would r
ecommend.  

Haven't been there in awhile but maybe I'll take a look over in the cctv fo
rum.


Re: Outdoor camera connections.
On 3/28/2013 9:09 PM, Jim wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
it, except for the feed hole. Instead take a mold of the surface > with that
conformal foam, like they use in packing. That stuff is like > a squishy pad.
You would make it flat on the outside mounting surface > and a 'perfect' fit on
the inside towards the wall. If you want, you > could make it rigid using
expandable fill-foam, cut to shape, then use > a thin sealant between the two.
Then there's the fibre glass epoxy > method, too. That's used in boats so would
be water proof and last a > while. I see somebody has started to think outside
the box a little bit for camera mounting.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
surface. No fancy brickwork. I wonder what the companies that do commercial
installs on regular basis use nowdays. I'm thinking they just screw the brackets
to the brick however they land and use the adjustments on the mounts to align
the camera. Me? I'm to frickin fussy .... I guess.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
section of the brick. That's what the Binford people on Tool Time would
recommend.
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Typically, for most of our camera installs where the surface is uneven  
it is made smooth using a chisel or grinder.  It depends on the what  
sort of peaks and valleys you got.  Some is harder to knock down than  
others.

The artistry comes when you put up the camera, box or bracket and  
there's no slop showing.

Same as putting a Knox Box up.

Re: Outdoor camera connections.
On Friday, March 29, 2013 6:00:57 AM UTC-4, JoeRaisin wrote:
 Typically, for most of our camera installs where the surface is uneven it  
is made smooth using a chisel or grinder. It depends on the what sort of pe
aks and valleys you got. Some is harder to knock down than others. The arti
stry comes when you put up the camera, box or bracket and there's no slop s
howing. Same as putting a Knox Box up.

With a Knox Box, it's usually large enough so that the "average" of the lum
ps and bumps just requires a few smacks with a hammer to knock of the large
st peaks. With such a small surface as the round surface mount of a bullet  
camera it's got to be a lot smoother.  

The more I ask around the more I'm leaning towards borrowing/renting a carb
ide disk cutting tool to smooth the surface down.  

I really appreciate all the input on this. Without this kind of help, you u
sually wind up doing a job the way you think is the best and then when you'
re done, someone sez ..... why didn't you do it THIS way? Which turns out i
s 10 times easier than the way you did it.  

At least if that happens on this job, I can blame all of you ...... !

Re: Outdoor camera connections.
On 3/29/2013 6:15 PM, Jim wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
made smooth using a chisel or grinder. It depends on the what sort of peaks and
valleys you got. Some is harder to knock down than others. The artistry comes
when you put up the camera, box or bracket and there's no slop showing. Same as
putting a Knox Box up.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
and bumps just requires a few smacks with a hammer to knock of the largest
peaks. With such a small surface as the round surface mount of a bullet camera
it's got to be a lot smoother.
Quoted text here. Click to load it

I like to mount them smooth - I just *know* that the one time i leave  
the slightest unevenness the damn rear tamper button won't clear.

Overkill, I know, but I always try to anticipate where problems could  
arise and eliminate the possibility if I can - if that makes any sense.

also silicon the top and sides so there's no chance of water doing  
anything with my wire hole, and I always (unless there's a reason I  
can't) drill my holes angled slightly down as they exit the building.

I'm one of those guys who would wear a belt AND suspenders...

Quoted text here. Click to load it
usually wind up doing a job the way you think is the best and then when you're
done, someone sez ..... why didn't you do it THIS way? Which turns out is 10
times easier than the way you did it.
Quoted text here. Click to load it


Re: Outdoor camera connections.

Quoted text here. Click to load it





And I thought I had cornered the market on the "belt AND suspenders" look!!

Dang it, a twin.

:-)  



Re: Outdoor camera connections.
On Saturday, March 30, 2013 6:57:35 AM UTC-4, JoeRaisin wrote:
 I like to mount them smooth - I just *know* that the one time i leave the  
slightest unevenness the damn rear tamper button won't clear. Overkill, I k
now, but I always try to anticipate where problems could arise and eliminat
e the possibility if I can - if that makes any sense. also silicon the top  
and sides so there's no chance of water doing anything with my wire hole, a
nd I always (unless there's a reason I can't) drill my holes angled slightl
y down as they exit the building. I'm one of those guys who would wear a be
lt AND suspenders...  

I know what you mean ...... and I DO wear a belt and suspenders .... but on
ly because I have so much (cell phone pouch with small screwdrivers, pens,  
pencils and keys) hanging on my belt that I need the suspenders to hold it  
all up. Besides .... old guys can do that and get away with it.  

Re: Outdoor camera connections.

On Saturday, March 30, 2013 6:57:35 AM UTC-4, JoeRaisin wrote:
 I like to mount them smooth - I just *know* that the one time i leave the  
slightest unevenness the damn rear tamper button won't clear. Overkill, I  
know, but I always try to anticipate where problems could arise and  
eliminate the possibility if I can - if that makes any sense. also silicon  
the top and sides so there's no chance of water doing anything with my wire  
hole, and I always (unless there's a reason I can't) drill my holes angled  
slightly down as they exit the building. I'm one of those guys who would  
wear a belt AND suspenders...

I know what you mean ...... and I DO wear a belt and suspenders .... but  
only because I have so much (cell phone pouch with small screwdrivers, pens,  
pencils and keys) hanging on my belt that I need the suspenders to hold it  
all up. Besides .... old guys can do that and get away with it.


My analogy is that you can't tie a string around a funnel.  With out my belt  
and suspenders I would have plumbers crack.  Believe me when I say, it is  
NOT a pretty site.

Les



Re: Outdoor camera connections.
On 3/19/2013 10:22 PM, Jim wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
a nice looking building and I'd like some ideas for mounting the cameras and
find out how you-all are terminating the camera connections. On other jobs that
I've done I've used treated wood either screwed or masonary nailed to the cement
block and used a weather proof 4X4 plastic box for the connections. All mounted
to a smooth cement brick surface. Really commercial and not necessary to be
"pretty".
Quoted text here. Click to load it
to attach a board to evenly and a anyway ...... a piece of treated wood and a
grey plastic box isn't going to look too good on the front of this nice
building.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
long. I presently use compression fittings for the wires going into the box and
caulk the wire hole through the wall. I'll be using baluns so I need the box.
Quoted text here. Click to load it


Give the job to AGD.  
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Y7I5h51rrE



--  
Fire Protection Technicians Network
www.firetechs.net

Re: Outdoor camera connections.

I have an installation of outdoor cameras on a brick building coming up.  
It's a nice looking building and I'd like some ideas for mounting the  
cameras and find out how you-all are terminating the camera connections. On  
other jobs that I've done I've used treated wood either screwed or masonary  
nailed to the cement block and used a weather proof 4X4 plastic box for the  
connections. All mounted to a smooth cement brick surface. Really commercial  
and not necessary to be "pretty".

This next job has colored unevenly textured bricks which is going to be hard  
to attach a board to evenly and a anyway ...... a piece of treated wood and  
a grey plastic box isn't going to look too good on the front of this nice  
building.
I'll be using bullet cameras and the connection leads are only about a foot  
long. I presently use compression fittings for the wires going into the box  
and caulk the wire hole through the wall. I'll be using baluns so I need the  
box.

Any suggestions?

Hi,

I am thinking perhaps outside the "box" here, or should I say inside. You  
say that the connection leads are about a foot long, and based upon this you  
want to use a box on the outside of this very nice building to hide your  
baluns and connectors.

If it was me, I would get some 2'-3' power extenders for the 12v or 24v lead  
from the camera; that should get you thru the wall into someplace more  
suitable for your final connectors.

For the video lead, do the same thing by making or buying a video extender  
cable. Again, that gets you thru the wall. Of course, I am assuming that  
this takes you into some kind of ceiling or something. If not, you could  
still put a box inside a building...usually looks better than outside the  
front of a building.

Now all you will need to do is to drill a hole about 3/4" to 1" thru the  
wall and pass the wires thru. The flange on a bullet camera should easily  
cover the hole that you drilled. Also, you should be able to find a spot  
that is smooth enough for the flange. Now all you will see on the outside is  
the camera...much prettier.

A video connector is just a hair under 5/8". I can get the cables thru on a  
3/4" hole by first taping the video connector to the thin wire of the power  
lead. Basically, you are staggering your actual connectors so that they are  
offset to each other, the power and video connectors are never lined up  
together. Pretend that you have a shorter power lead from the camera than  
the video lead and I think you will get the picture.

I usually find a "T" in the grout joint between bricks to drill thru much  
softer cement than bricks. That is the place that the biggest hole can be  
drilled much more easily. Bring some aspirin for your shoulder if you drill  
thru the brick without a hammer drill. I attempted to do that a while ago.  
The hole had to be in a specific spot because of this particular building. I  
gave up after 20 minutes of fruitless drilling 16' up in a ladder. Home  
Depoed it the next morning with the "Holenator", makes brick feel like Swiss  
cheese instead.

Hope this helps you.  



Re: Outdoor camera connections.
On Thursday, March 21, 2013 7:09:28 PM UTC-4, E DAWSON wrote:
 Hi, I am thinking perhaps outside the "box" here, or should I say inside.  
You say that the connection leads are about a foot long, and based upon thi
s you want to use a box on the outside of this very nice building to hide y
our baluns and connectors. If it was me, I would get some 2'-3' power exten
ders for the 12v or 24v lead from the camera; that should get you thru the  
wall into someplace more suitable for your final connectors. For the video  
lead, do the same thing by making or buying a video extender cable. Again,  
that gets you thru the wall. Of course, I am assuming that this takes you i
nto some kind of ceiling or something. If not, you could still put a box in
side a building...usually looks better than outside the front of a building
. Now all you will need to do is to drill a hole about 3/4" to 1" thru the  
wall and pass the wires thru. The flange on a bullet camera should easily c
over the hole that you drilled. Also, you should be able to find a spot tha
t is smooth enough for the flange. Now all you will see on the outside is t
he camera...much prettier. A video connector is just a hair under 5/8". I c
an get the cables thru on a 3/4" hole by first taping the video connector t
o the thin wire of the power lead. Basically, you are staggering your actua
l connectors so that they are offset to each other, the power and video con
nectors are never lined up together. Pretend that you have a shorter power  
lead from the camera than the video lead and I think you will get the pictu
re. I usually find a "T" in the grout joint between bricks to drill thru mu
ch softer cement than bricks. That is the place that the biggest hole can b
e drilled much more easily. Bring some aspirin for your shoulder if you dri
ll thru the brick without a hammer drill. I attempted to do that a while ag
o. The hole had to be in a specific spot because of this particular buildin
g. I gave up after 20 minutes of fruitless drilling 16' up in a ladder. Hom
e Depoed it the next morning with the "Holenator", makes brick feel like Sw
iss cheese instead. Hope this helps you.

Your suggestion "sounds" good but I have a problem with the fact that there
 will be connectors ..... in the hole in the cement. Your suggestion would  
be great if the leads from the camera were two feet long so that the connec
tons would be on the inside of the building. Also, I have no idea at this t
ime as to how thick the wall really is. The building is concrete block on t
he inside and textured brick on the outside. I'm guessing the the wall is p
robably 8 to 10 inches thick .... but it could be more. I'll have to determ
ine how thick it is before I make a decision how I'm going to do this. If t
he outside textured brick is not too thick, I'm picturing making a "larger"
 hole in the "hollow" part of the cement brick on the inside of the buildin
g then drilling the wire hole the rest of the way through to the outside. T
he connectors would be accessable, and able to be protected and the hole co
uld be covered with a backless 6 x 6 electrical box and cover. Up high on t
he inside of the building it would hardly be noticed. The ceilings are 20 f
eet.  

 The other problem I see is that the mounting flange of the camera is only  
about three and a half inches in diameter, so mounting it the way you sugge
sted, directly to the brick would require being extremely lucky in finding  
four flat corners of the bricks that are all flat enough to mount the camer
a. Then drilling at the very edges of the brick is very likely to crack the
 corners of at least one and maybe all the bricks. If that happens then I'm
 screwed. I still think I need some kind of a mounting surface/material for
 the cameras.  

What do you think!

Re: Outdoor camera connections.


Your suggestion "sounds" good but I have a problem with the fact that there  
will be connectors ..... in the hole in the cement. Your suggestion would be  
great if the leads from the camera were two feet long so that the connectons  
would be on the inside of the building. Also, I have no idea at this time as  
to how thick the wall really is. The building is concrete block on the  
inside and textured brick on the outside. I'm guessing the the wall is  
probably 8 to 10 inches thick .... but it could be more. I'll have to  
determine how thick it is before I make a decision how I'm going to do this.  
If the outside textured brick is not too thick, I'm picturing making a  
"larger" hole in the "hollow" part of the cement brick on the inside of the  
building then drilling the wire hole the rest of the way through to the  
outside. The connectors would be accessable, and able to be protected and  
the hole could be covered with a backless 6 x 6 electrical box and cover. Up  
high on the inside of the building it would hardly be noticed. The ceilings  
are 20 feet.

 The other problem I see is that the mounting flange of the camera is only  
about three and a half inches in diameter, so mounting it the way you  
suggested, directly to the brick would require being extremely lucky in  
finding four flat corners of the bricks that are all flat enough to mount  
the camera. Then drilling at the very edges of the brick is very likely to  
crack the corners of at least one and maybe all the bricks. If that happens  
then I'm screwed. I still think I need some kind of a mounting  
surface/material for the cameras.

What do you think!

Two more thoughts for you.  You could use some brass pipe over long lag  
bolts to mount the box on the outside.  Consider them as stand-offs of  
sorts.  Doing this would allow the box to sit square to the wall and make it  
secure.  Just cut the brass pipe to length as needed.  Use a piece of  
Conduit to pass through the back into the wall to protect the cables.

The other thought would be if you wanted to use a compound that can be found  
it the paint dept at Lowes.  It comes out of the tub in a very think past.  
Apply in layers behind the box to fill in the opening giving a better look.  
It has sand in it that gives the look of mortar or stone grout.  Can't think  
of the actual name but if you ask or look on the caulk or concrete fill or  
patch it should show up.  It is a light gray in color.

I am sure with all this thinking you will find something that will work.  
Posting pictures somewhere would be nice.

Les



Re: Outdoor camera connections.
On Friday, March 22, 2013 7:24:25 PM UTC-4, Pa_Bound wrote:

 Two more thoughts for you. You could use some brass pipe over long lag bol
ts to mount the box on the outside. Consider them as stand-offs of sorts. D
oing this would allow the box to sit square to the wall and make it secure.
 Just cut the brass pipe to length as needed. Use a piece of Conduit to pas
s through the back into the wall to protect the cables. The other thought w
ould be if you wanted to use a compound that can be found it the paint dept
 at Lowes. It comes out of the tub in a very think past. Apply in layers be
hind the box to fill in the opening giving a better look. It has sand in it
 that gives the look of mortar or stone grout. Can't think of the actual na
me but if you ask or look on the caulk or concrete fill or patch it should  
show up. It is a light gray in color. I am sure with all this thinking you  
will find something that will work. Posting pictures somewhere would be nic
e. Les

Spacers would be ok and probably not be able to be seen from the ground tha
t good either but I've got seven outdoor cameras. That's a lot of brass and
 a lot of custom length cutting. Is that the stuff that they put down to ne
st a tub in?
Or it just might be Quick Patch. I'd have to see how well it drilled and st
uck to the textured brick.  

All good things I'd have to look at on my next "Depot" run and to try out.  
  

I just replaced my digital camera that I lost, so if I think of it I'll tak
e some pic's. It'll be a couple of months.  I'll just have to have someone  
tell me how to post them so people in the group can see them.

Re: Outdoor camera connections.

On Thursday, March 21, 2013 7:09:28 PM UTC-4, E DAWSON wrote:
 Hi, I am thinking perhaps outside the "box" here, or should I say inside.  
You say that the connection leads are about a foot long, and based upon this  
you want to use a box on the outside of this very nice building to hide your  
baluns and connectors. If it was me, I would get some 2'-3' power extenders  
for the 12v or 24v lead from the camera; that should get you thru the wall  
into someplace more suitable for your final connectors. For the video lead,  
do the same thing by making or buying a video extender cable. Again, that  
gets you thru the wall. Of course, I am assuming that this takes you into  
some kind of ceiling or something. If not, you could still put a box inside  
a building...usually looks better than outside the front of a building. Now  
all you will need to do is to drill a hole about 3/4" to 1" thru the wall  
and pass the wires thru. The flange on a bullet camera should easily cover  
the hole that you drilled. Also, you should be able to find a spot that is  
smooth enough for the flange. Now all you will see on the outside is the  
camera...much prettier. A video connector is just a hair under 5/8". I can  
get the cables thru on a 3/4" hole by first taping the video connector to  
the thin wire of the power lead. Basically, you are staggering your actual  
connectors so that they are offset to each other, the power and video  
connectors are never lined up together. Pretend that you have a shorter  
power lead from the camera than the video lead and I think you will get the  
picture. I usually find a "T" in the grout joint between bricks to drill  
thru much softer cement than bricks. That is the place that the biggest hole  
can be drilled much more easily. Bring some aspirin for your shoulder if you  
drill thru the brick without a hammer drill. I attempted to do that a while  
ago. The hole had to be in a specific spot because of this particular  
building. I gave up after 20 minutes of fruitless drilling 16' up in a  
ladder. Home Depoed it the next morning with the "Holenator", makes brick  
feel like Swiss cheese instead. Hope this helps you.

Your suggestion "sounds" good but I have a problem with the fact that there  
will be connectors ..... in the hole in the cement. Your suggestion would be  
great if the leads from the camera were two feet long so that the connectons  
would be on the inside of the building. Also, I have no idea at this time as  
to how thick the wall really is. The building is concrete block on the  
inside and textured brick on the outside. I'm guessing the the wall is  
probably 8 to 10 inches thick .... but it could be more. I'll have to  
determine how thick it is before I make a decision how I'm going to do this.  
If the outside textured brick is not too thick, I'm picturing making a  
"larger" hole in the "hollow" part of the cement brick on the inside of the  
building then drilling the wire hole the rest of the way through to the  
outside. The connectors would be accessable, and able to be protected and  
the hole could be covered with a backless 6 x 6 electrical box and cover. Up  
high on the inside of the building it would hardly be noticed. The ceilings  
are 20 feet.

 The other problem I see is that the mounting flange of the camera is only  
about three and a half inches in diameter, so mounting it the way you  
suggested, directly to the brick would require being extremely lucky in  
finding four flat corners of the bricks that are all flat enough to mount  
the camera. Then drilling at the very edges of the brick is very likely to  
crack the corners of at least one and maybe all the bricks. If that happens  
then I'm screwed. I still think I need some kind of a mounting  
surface/material for the cameras.

What do you think!

Hi again,

The video and power connectors in the cement hole can be wrapped in  
electrical tape so that there will be no grounding possibilities to the  
concrete. Whether the connectors are in the hole or somewhere else does not  
bother me in the least bit. They are loosely in the round cavity and  
perfectly well protected. If you need to get to them, they can be easily  
pulled back out. They are really going to be a permanent connection and  
extension of your short leads coming out of the camera.

You also mentioned that you are concerned about attaching the camera  
directly to the brick and finding enough of a flat surface. If you drill  
even a 1" hole for your video and power leads to go thru, in the mortar  
joint spot where the horizontal and vertical mortar joints meet, you will  
find that your fasteners will be in 3 individual bricks-based on an average  
brick size. Normally, on a round flange, you should have only 3 holes for  
fasteners. So, with as large a flange as you describe, 3 1/2", and based  
upon the average distance of the holes in the flange to be about 3/8" in  
from the edge, coupled with a 1" hole in the center for your wiring, that  
leaves a distance of about 3/4" of net brick/mortar in between the center  
hole and your fastening holes. That is plenty of space so that nothing will  
crack. I am assuming that you are drilling a 1/4" hole into the brick for  
your fasteners. Unless your cameras are going to be used for wall climbing  
exercises, there is no need to use any larger fasteners than that. By using  
3 bricks, you can create a more even surface for your flange. Think of it as  
a three-legged stool.

Let me take you further outside the box again. You keep looking at the  
flange like all of it has to be perfectly flat up against the brick. It does  
not, only the 3 points where your fasteners are, need to be parallel with  
the wall surface. You can use a nifty little invention called 'washers' to  
adjust your camera flange to that it clears any obstruction in the brick  
surface. Also, as one person mentioned earlier, a tiny bit of carefully  
applied chiseling will work wonders. By the way, make sure you buy stainless  
steel washers and fasteners also.

So now you'll say, but what about the gap between the flange and the brick  
because of the washers? Well, what I would use is the same similar type of  
gasket stuff that comes with a pvc electrical box. It is spongy and will  
adapt to any surface. I have some in sheets of about 1' x 1'. It can come in  
different thicknesses, I have some that is 3/8" thick. You just cut it to  
size of flange, in your case 3 1/2". Cut a 1" hole in the middle for the  
wiring and cut out your holes for the fasteners. Now that makes a custom  
well-fitted seal. Additionally, I would then apply a thin layer of  
nicely-applied 50-year silicone to the edge between the flange and the brick  
for added protection.

That's how I would do it without going to any further extreme. It will be  
very sturdy, it will look very good, it will be flat, it will be well  
sealed, and you can get at any of the wiring anytime.

About finding where you can buy that sheet gasket material, I have had mine  
for quite a long time. I cannot remember exactly how it came into my  
possession. But, by using this internet, a dedicated researcher can find out  
soon enough. If you cannot find it, let me know. When I have some time I  
will find it for you. No, I really doubt that it will be a Home Depot or  
Lowes available product, but you could be pleasantly surprised.

I hope this has helped you further.  



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