Good news... well, sort of - Page 2

Have a question or want to start a discussion? Post it! No Registration Necessary.  Now with pictures!

Threaded View
Re: Good news... well, sort of


Quoted text here. Click to load it
han we originally thought -- maybe six months or more.
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Well at least you included RLB in your reply, that seems to be the
only time you mention him when he's on a bender.

Re: Good news... well, sort of


Quoted text here. Click to load it
 than we originally thought -- maybe six months or more.
Quoted text here. Click to load it

RHC: On a bender ?....I'd say given the stuff you've sent his way,
he's being mild in his replies !

Re: Good news... well, sort of



Quoted text here. Click to load it
not as rapidly as expected.  He says I may have more time than we originally
thought -- maybe six months or more.
Quoted text here. Click to load it


Robert, my news servers drop your messages when they have your v-card
attached.  I didn't see your OP.   Would you please consider not posting
binaries, because I'm sure I'm not the only one who doesn't see them.



Re: Good news... well, sort of


Quoted text here. Click to load it
e originally thought -- maybe six months or more.
Quoted text here. Click to load it

This from someone who once posted David Allan Coe mp3's?

Re: Good news... well, sort of


"G. Morgan" wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Sure.  Here it is.  I accidentally hit "Insert... Business Card" instead of
"Insert... Signature."

I went in for chemo today.  The doctor says the tumors are still growing but
not as rapidly as expected.  He says I may have more time than we originally
thought -- maybe six months or more.

Robert


Re: Good news... well, sort of


On Wed, 23 Sep 2009 01:39:47 -0400, "Robert L Bass"

Quoted text here. Click to load it


That's good news.  I'll bet he says the same thing six months from now!



Re: Good news... well, sort of


"G. Morgan" wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Could be.  I have a malignant pleural effusion from lung cancer
[clickety-click, click: Leuck furiously Googling away though he will of course
deny it].  I had this from the start.  No one told me that the prognosis was
so grim 3 years ago.  No one told me I was supposed to die in about 2-4 months
so I just kept on living.  Now the pleura is a real mess and the cancer has
spread everywhere but I'm still "thriving" (that's how my oncologist describes
it) so he says I'll last a little longer.

Some wise person said that doctors often tell you that you've only got xx
months to live so when you outlast their predictions they become heroes.
Maybe that's a part of this, too.

Anyway, I'm considering heading back to Brazil for Carnaval 2010 if I'm still
on my feet that far along.  You've probably read about Carnaval in Rio De
Janeiro or seen bits about it on TV at one time or another.  It's this
incredible show that you watch from viewing stands (called the Sambadroma).

That's OK for tourists but I prefer the Nordestino (in the NE cities of
Brazil) version of Carnaval.  There it's a bacchanalian street party with
literally hundreds of thousands of people out in the streets -- laughing,
dancing, drinking, kissing random strangers and listening to the greatest
bands in all of South America as they slowly make their way along a 6-8
kilometer parade route.

Bear in mind this is no parade like we have on July 4.  You don't stand on the
sidewalk cheering from behind wooden barricades.  No, everyone is out in the
middle of the crowd.  As you know I love a good party.  Well, this is a the
great grand-daddy of all parties and it goes on for six days officially but
actually lasts for weeks if you're invited to all the pre- and post-Carnaval
"festas."  I have a number of good friends in several cities around the NE so
I'm always out for one or another event.  I'll be single by the time Carnaval
rolls around so what the heck!

I'm sure Nick knows one thing I've come to realize while fighting this
disease.  For the most part you cannot control when or how you will die.  The
only thing you can control, at least to a certain extent, is how you will live
in the meantime.  I choose to live every day.  I hope you do, too.

--

Regards,
Robert L Bass

==============================>
Bass Home Electronics
DIY Alarm and Home Automation Store
http://www.bassburglaralarms.com
Sales & Service 941-870-2310
Fax 941-870-3252
==============================>


Re: Good news... well, sort of


wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
I get antsy in an elevator with more than four people.

But ............. Thanks for the warning.

Vist to Brazil during Carnival goes on the list with Hati, Dominican
Republic, Espaniol , places in Mexico, and most of the other South
American countries., along with Iraq Iran and Afganistan.

I Don't go to places where there are big uncontrolable crowds or
hostile people. Limits my travel destinations sometimes but there are
lots of other choices and the relaxation level is great.

Re: Good news... well, sort of


"Jim" wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

I heard someone say he wanted to make oifficial-looking stickers to place on
the wall of an elevator saying, "7 Button Does Not Work. Please Press 3 + 4."

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Carnaval is only half of that.  They have uncontrollable crowds of extremely
friendly people.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

OK, I'll grant you that.  Carnaval is NOT relaxing...  :^)

To experience true relaxation, Brazilian style, check out my album on Boipeba
Island.  This is a place where there are no cars, no roads and no locks on the
doors and windows of the "Bed and Breakfast" (Brazilians call it a Poussada).
You hop out of the boat when it pulls up to the beach and the driver hands
your luggage over to the taxi driver.  The "taxi" is a wheel barrow.  They
cart your stuff down the beach and you follow on foot.  It's not a problem
since the walk is only 5-10 minutes and the beach is beautiful.  The Poussada
sits is not visible from the beach -- just a set of stairs leading up into the
mata (jungle).  Once under the forest canopy, your eyes are greeted by a scene
out of Robinson Caruso, except the part of Friday is played by a bevy of
beautiful Brasileiras offering to bring you a beverage as you relax in a
hammock between towering palms while other helpers scurry back and forth
carting your gear to your room.

Evening meals consist of fish that was caught within the hour, fruit and salad
plucked from the forest just long enough ago to cut and chill over a bed of
ice and unbelievable salads and deserts.  Breakfast is a veritable feast of
eggs, sliced meats, fresh fruits of every imaginable variety, home made breads
and little cakes, and fried creations made from manioc, tapioca and so on.
Lunch was served at a floating bar/disco/restaurant a few miles out from the
Poussada (the place looked pretty shabby but the food was excellent and the
drinks were ice cold).

BTW, a couple of years ago I teased you by posting a link to a picture of a
run-down fishing boat that I jokingly dubbed the "SS Jiminex" (apologies for
the rudeness).  That boat was one of a group plying the bay that leads from
Boipeba to the nearest mainland town.  The tourist boats are mostly schooners,
a few small power boats and a number of pontoon boats.  They come over from
Morro de Sao Paulo (a famous and very busy beach resort on the nearby island
of Tinhare) and from the capital city of Salvador across the huge Bahia de
Todos os Santos (Bay of All Saints) where I have a condo.

We took the whole family to Boipeba for a long weekend several years ago to
celebrate my birthday.  I hope to have time for a second visit next time I go
down.  That will be my fifteenth (and possibly final) trip to my beloved
second country.  We'll see how all that works out.

Friends have also asked me to go island hopping to the Bahamas via private
plane (several are pilots).  IIRC, you've got a degree of experience there.
Any recommendations?

--

Regards,
Robert L Bass

==============================>
Bass Home Electronics
DIY Alarm and Home Automation Store
http://www.bassburglaralarms.com
Sales & Service 941-870-2310
Fax 941-870-3252
==============================>



Re: Good news... well, sort of


"Robert L Bass" wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

I meant to include a link to one of my photos of the island.  Here it is:
http://tinyurl.com/BoipebaVillage

--

Regards,
Robert L Bass

==============================>
Bass Home Electronics
DIY Alarm and Home Automation Store
http://www.bassburglaralarms.com
Sales & Service 941-870-2310
Fax 941-870-3252
==============================>


Re: Good news... well, sort of



Quoted text here. Click to load it

Queens Tower.  Its not that big of a deal, but I was 3 years old when I was
there.  I remember looking down at all the little toy houses and cars and I
was convinced it was a model town with little toy cars.  Walking along the
working areas of the docks is another strong memory.  Talking to the local
fishermen, and looking at all the boats.  I've a few other memories of the
the trip, but they don't tell as well as they remember.

 


Re: Good news... well, sort of


"Bob La Londe" wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Thanks, Bob.  I just noticed this post after replying to the others.


Re: Good news... well, sort of


wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
The Poussada

Most of my more recent trips south are in the Leeward and Windward
Islands of the Carribrean and also the British Virgin Islands.

The Bahamas was about 50 years ago, so I don't think much of what I
experienced then would still be valid. However, I've seen TV Travel
shows that show some of the areas that I visited back then and some of
the areas don't seem to have changed all that much. Grand Bahama
Island has become commercialized I'm told, but I'm sure there are some
great things to still see there. I used to go there for spear fishing
contests. Spanish Wells is another place and is still as exclusive as
I remember it. Read up on it's history. Rather unique. Very very laid
back. The Island of Eleuthera is where I spent most of my time. About
two and a half years. It was very undeveloped at the time. Only one
tarred road that most times one car had to stop, so the other could
pass by. We would spend up to 5 days on the beach and never see
another soul. Scuba and free diving. Spearing fish and longusta, and
cooking them in an old wash pail on the beach. We'd pick pineapples
and bananas from areas where plantations used to be. And drinking lots
of booze. Sleeping out was kind of a love/hate thing, choosing between
the beauty of a pitch black night and a gazillion stars with the surf
crashing in the background and land crabs crawling in your sleeping
bag.  Great life when you're only 18 years old.

There were a couple of resorts there then, but not for the common man.
I think there's a Sandels Resort there now and I'm sure it's nothing
like I remember. I've been tempted to go back but then I stop myself.
I would rather remember it as it was.

Of course there was Nassau too. It was pretty good nite life back then
as Calypso music and doing the Limbo was all the rage. On the island
that the Atlantis hotel is on now, when I was there, there wasn't even
a bridge to get across to it. And, believe it or not, it was called
Hog Island. They would just let the hogs, run wild there and go across
every now and then to "harvest" dinner. How it ever became Paradise
Island, I'll never figure out. However, hearing from recent visitors,
there's lots of fast food Mc Donalds and others on the main drag of
town, now. The Straw market, where natives would make you anything you
wanted out of straw is gone and lots of the other quaint attractions
too. There used to be an old fort there, just on the outskirts of
town, Fort Montigue, that was in disrepair, which made it seem more
authentic. I don't know if that is still there or not. Also, on what
is now Paradise Island there were the remnants of the Cloisters that
we used to explore. I've heard, but don't know for sure, that now it's
part of a hotel, used for weddings or something, but still able to be
visited.

I played in a little four piece band back then and the natives just
loved Rock and Roll. I did a lot of drinking so there's a lot of
places I don't remember too clearly. I do know that I'll never drink a
vodka collins again. Or rum and Coke, either.  I often say, that if I
were destined to be an alcoholic, that was the time it would have
begun. Fortunately the drawbacks of throwing up  and falling down
often, won out over the party, party, party scene.

Ahh, and those "brown skinned girls" ........ Jannette Moree', where
are you now?

But, as they say, "those were the days"

Re: Good news... well, sort of


"Jim" wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Probably not, but thnks for the stories.  It sounds like it *was* wonderful.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Yep.  If they were as passionate as the Brasileiras I've known you had quite
some youth.  My only regret is I never traveled outside the US (well, except
for a few times to Canada and Mexico) until my fifties.  I suspect if I'd gone
to South America in my teens I never would have come back.  :^)

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Well, even now you're an old, married fart, you still have great memories.  Do
you still sail much?

Regards,
Robert


Re: Good news... well, sort of


wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

I've always done most of my "sailing" in the Carribean. Having less
time here, I'm a power boater.

Re: Good news... well, sort of


"Jim" wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

That's funny.  I always just assumed you had a sailboat.  I've been on board
sailboats a few times but much prefer power boats, though I never owned one.

--

Regards,
Robert


Re: Good news... well, sort of


Jim wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

I thought you did work in NYC.



--
js

Si Vis Pacem, Para Bellum



Re: Good news... well, sort of


Quoted text here. Click to load it

I thought he was more in the upstate area

Re: Good news... well, sort of


Quoted text here. Click to load it

Not Me!!!!!!!!!   That'd be Tom.

I don't think I've been to Manhattan more than 20 times in my whole
life. Besides, I'm not allowed to "carry" in NYC. where ironically is
exactly where you need to.

Re: Good news... well, sort of


"Jim" wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

I had my senior year of high school in Manhattan (on 59th near Lex) and worked
in midtown a few years later.  For a few months I worked in an office on the
30th floor of the Empire State building.  I guess that makes me more a New
Yorker than you, Jim...  :^)

Regards,
Robert


Site Timeline