Glass skylights

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I haven't covered glass skylights in a long time..what's out there these days?

The skylight could easily be removed with a screwdriver as well...just to add to
the fun.

I used to use IEI Viper's and a contact or Sentrol Shatterpro and a
contact...whatelse we got these days?






Re: Glass skylights
Crash Gordon® wrote:
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I've used alarm screens.
js




Re: Glass skylights
Interesting idea...kinda like the old days with wooden dowels or lacing wire.

Alarm screen would be cheap too as these are not very big...just dunno if client
will go for it or not. I gonna seriously consider this though! Thanks!




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Re: Glass skylights
Curtain PIR?

I haven't covered glass skylights in a long time..what's out there these
days?

The skylight could easily be removed with a screwdriver as well...just to
add to the fun.

I used to use IEI Viper's and a contact or Sentrol Shatterpro and a
contact...whatelse we got these days?







Re: Glass skylights
Yah...seems an overkill in a 2' x 3' skylight...but yah probably be better than
shock/contact.


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Re: Glass skylights
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That's what we used to do on large commercial structures.  Turn a PIR with a
curtain lens 90º so the curtain forms a horizontal plane of detection a foot
or so below the skylight.  Just be careful to mount the PIR so that sunlight
doesn't strike the lens.

--

Regards,
Robert L Bass

=============================>
Bass Home Electronics
2291 Pine View Circle
Sarasota · Florida · 34231
877-722-8900 Sales & Tech Support
http://www.bassburglaralarms.com
=============================>




Re: Glass skylights


mikey wrote:
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I had an experience many years ago with using a curtain PIR in a
similar type of installation.

Customer wanted protection above his drop ceiling against someone
coming in through the roof. The distance between the hard ceiling and
the drop ceiling was about 3 feet. I mounted a Visonic (forget the
model #) curtain PIR on it's side. I seem to remember it was rated at
35 feet(?). I couldn't get detection at any range further than about
17-18 feet. I wound up having to use more than one unit above the
ceiling, to cover the area that I wanted.

I had to assume that the divergence of the array, between the two
ceilings, got too wide with distance to be able to detect the cross
section of a body perpendicular to the curtain, at anything further
than 17 feet.

When I tested the unit below the ceiling it worked at a greater
distance but not at the maximum distance the unit was rated for. I
found that when the unit was mounted on it's side and you "stood up"
perpendicular to the curtain, the unit wouldn't detect as far away as
it would as if the unit were mounted with the unit mounted properly and
you walked through the curtain in parallel with the array. I assumed
that since the size of the heat source the unit sees is smaller when
mounted on it's side, that the range was somewhat shortened.

That was with Visonics very first curtain unit. I'm sure things have
changed since then. ( don't have much call for curtain units) But it
would be an interesting experiment to see if it still affects the range
when used horizontally.



Re: Glass skylights
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But it

good point




Re: Glass skylights
Don't forget about the heat that's present above a drop ceiling, it will
reduce the range of most PIR's......... Regards, Russ

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Re: Glass skylights


Russ Brill wrote:
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As a matter of fact I did consider that but this was in an ice cream
shop and the guys former job was in the HVAC and refrigeration business
and he had the place colder n an iceberg. And, as I mentioned, it still
was reduced range when I experimented with it below the ceiling. Moot
point now, but just thought I'd mention my observations just in case
anyone wanted to experiment or ran into similar problems in the future.



Re: Glass skylights
The old dowel screens are no longer being made.

A suggestion might be to take some small diameter PVC with some T's and
elbows, some joint compound and make a PVC screen.  Make sure to run
lacing wire for an alarm circuit in a unique pattern through the tubing
before sealing.  This should  make for a nice looking screen.  Make sure
to UV resistant PVC.

Bobby D

Crash Gordon® wrote:

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Re: Glass skylights
bdolph wrote:
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?
Why not just use an alarm screen?
js




Re: Glass skylights
Alarm screen would look nicer in a 2 million $$ house than pvc and lace wire. I
thinking I'm gonna go with a couple of tiny motion detectors and be done with
it.


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Re: Glass skylights
Sorry.  I was thinking it was a warehouse skylight.

Here is something that you might want to take a look at.

http://www.seco-larm.com/CrtnSens.htm


BobbyD

Crash Gordon® wrote:

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thinking I'm gonna go with a couple of tiny motion detectors and be done with
it.
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Re: Glass skylights
AH...I like that! thanks


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I thinking I'm gonna go with a couple of tiny motion detectors and be done with
it.
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