Do Plasma Monitors/TVs suffer from "burn-in"?

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I seem to be getting conflicting info from the store reps (surprise!!?!?!?).

If a Plasma monitor/TV is used for computer/video game/TV and movies, is it
susceptible to burn-in on the the screen if a given image is displayed for
long periods of time... how long is safe to avoid burn-in?

TIA,
Chip




Re: Do Plasma Monitors/TVs suffer from "burn-in"?
> I seem to be getting conflicting info from the store reps
(surprise!!?!?!?).
>
> If a Plasma monitor/TV is used for computer/video game/TV and movies, is
it
> susceptible to burn-in on the the screen if a given image is displayed for
> long periods of time... how long is safe to avoid burn-in?
>
> TIA,
> Chip
>

Found some good info and thought it might help others with this question...

http://www.plasmatvbuyingguide.com/plasmatv/plasmatv-burnin.html

"(1) Some obvious advice: Do not leave static images on your plasma TV
screen. Turn off your unit when you are not watching it. Do not pause DVDs
for more than a few minutes at a time.

(2) Know that plasma screens are more prone to burn-in during their first
200 hours of use. When phosphors are fresh, they burn more intensely as they
are ignited. This means that relatively new plasma display panels are prone
to ghosting, which occurs when on-screen images appear to stay on the screen
belatedly. This is probably just a function of the high intensity with which
new phosphors "pop," and this phenomenon usually "washes out" on its own, as
the screen displays subsequent images. When static images are left on new
plasma screens too long (more than a few minutes at a time), though,
ghosting quickly develops into something more permanent -- burn-in.

Self-Defense: Break your new plasma monitor in slowly. Keep the CONTRAST set
at or below 50% -- any higher only causes phosphors to glow more intensely,
which decreases the length of time necessary for burn-in to occur. And, be
sure to avail yourself of your plasma's anti-burn-in features. These are
monotone gray or snow screen settings that "wash" your plasma screen by
recalibrating pixel intensity levels uniformly. This reduces the visual
effects of ghosting. It's probably a good idea to run one of these screen
"wash" cycles after about 100 viewing hours or so. (Note: These processes
will impact the lifespan of the phosphors in your unit, so you should run
them selectively and on an as-needed basis.)

(3) Know, too, that some plasma display panels burn-in more easily than
others. In my experience, AliS type panels -- the ones utilized by Hitachi
and Fujistu -- seem more readily given over to problems with burn-in.

(4) Utilize burn-in protection like power management settings, full-time
picture shift (both vertical and horizontal), and automatic screen-saver
functions. Check your Owner's Manual for further information.

(5) Realize that quality matters with burn-in as with everything else. You
definitely want to purchase a plasma monitor that has really good scaling,
so that you can watch 4:3 TV programs in widescreen comfortably. It is just
not a good idea to leave black bars on your TV screen for prolonged periods
of time, so you are probably better off watching most everything in "full
screen" mode. This should not really bother you, if your TV exhibits good
full-screen scaling.

Also, higher quality TVs tend to be more resistant to burn-in -- though not
entirely immune to it, of course. Of the plasma displays I've owned and/or
tested extensively, NEC, Sony, Pioneer, and Panasonic seemed least prone to
burn-in once their pictures were properly broken in. Even so, I would NEVER
leave a static image on any plasma TV screen, regardless of quality, for
more than hour. "



"The Bottom Line on Burn-In: Plasma TV burn-in is not an issue that should
cause undue concern in the average user. With a modicum of caution, most
plasma TVs will probably never have a problem with image retention. A viewer
may experience temporary ghosting, but this is certainly not cause for
alarm. In truth, carelessness -- i.e., not paying attention to what your TV
is displaying and for how long -- is really the leading "cause" of permanent
burn-in. "




Re: Do Plasma Monitors/TVs suffer from "burn-in"?



> (5) Realize that quality matters with burn-in as with everything else. You
> definitely want to purchase a plasma monitor that has really good scaling,
> so that you can watch 4:3 TV programs in widescreen comfortably. It is
> just
> not a good idea to leave black bars on your TV screen for prolonged
> periods
> of time, so you are probably better off watching most everything in "full
> screen" mode. This should not really bother you, if your TV exhibits good
> full-screen scaling.
>

Of course, frustratingly, when watching HD/Digital signals that are not in
widescreen - such as much of what appears on the HD/Digital channels of
local network affiliates - sadly, most plasma sets (at least my Sony...)
won't let you adjust the set's "wide mode" feature at all - and your are
stuck with the black bars... Funny, you'd think that one of the advantages
of being in the digital domain would be a greater ability to adjust the
picture rather than a lesser ability (or a complete loss of that ability) to
adjust the width of the picture... especially as loss of that ability so
obviously increases the potential exposure to burn-in problems...




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