Firewall-1: Can Internal Hosts Share One Public IP With Static and Hidden NAT?

Have a question or want to start a discussion? Post it! No Registration Necessary.  Now with pictures!

Threaded View
We have two mail servers:  one for incoming mail and one for outgoing, and
both are behind Firewall-1.   I want them to be seen on the Internet as a
single IP address.    Can I have a single common public address that exists
both in a static and hidden translation rule at the same time?

I would configure the incoming mail server with a static rule, so that
incoming packets to that public IP get directed by the firewall to the
incoming mail server.   I would configure the outgoing mail server with a
hidden automatic NAT rule that points to the same public IP, so that
outgoing packets from that mail server get NAT'd to the common public IP.

I know this works for more than one host to share one public IP using hidden
translation, but I don't know yet if it would work with a single public IP
using both a static and hidden rule.   Any advice on this is appreciated.

--
Will





Re: Firewall-1: Can Internal Hosts Share One Public IP With Static and Hidden NAT?
: We have two mail servers:  one for incoming mail and one for outgoing, and
: both are behind Firewall-1.   I want them to be seen on the Internet as a
: single IP address.    Can I have a single common public address that exists
: both in a static and hidden translation rule at the same time?

Try using a normal automatic static setup for the inbound connection and setup a
manual rule with a hide rule for the outbound connection.

Lars

Re: Firewall-1: Can Internal Hosts Share One Public IP With Static and Hidden NAT?
Lookup "smtp security server" in the help files, you'll need that to get the
incoming mail traffic working. If you're not sure, check CD2 and the \\Docs
directory.

Wayne McGlinn
Brisbane, Oz

Quoted text here. Click to load it


Re: Firewall-1: Can Internal Hosts Share One Public IP With Static and Hidden NAT?
: Lookup "smtp security server" in the help files, you'll need that to get the
: incoming mail traffic working. If you're not sure, check CD2 and the \\Docs
: directory.

I guess the reasons he wants to do this is because he wants to put an
extra email filtering box in the mail flow? He didn't specify, but it's
a very common thing to do now. The SMTP Security Server used to be very
widely used a few years ago. As the years passed, the spam problem
increased while the SMTP Securiy Server remained unchanged.

You can still use the SMTP Sercuriy server in front of your spam
filtering server but you'll loose potential functionality such as
delaying (also known as greylisting), DNSBL, HELO blacklisting and you
won't be able to block emails at the SMTP level that will avoid your
systems from sending faulty NDRs.

Lars

Site Timeline