Passed INTRO on to ICND

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I have already passed the Cisco 640-821 CCNA INTRO, I was just
wondering for anyone else who took the path of Intro and ICND how hard
the ICND is compared to the intro?

Thanks


Re: Passed INTRO on to ICND
Good question,

I have my ICND booked for next week...



BMoore wrote:
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Re: Passed INTRO on to ICND
I passed the ICND yesterday with 95%

I'd say it was slightly more difficult than the INTRO, but not much. The
labs were easier than I was expecting, and I didn't have any problems
with time - I finished 20 minutes early.



BMoore wrote:
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Re: Passed INTRO on to ICND
Just taken the exam and missed narrowly. To be frank it may as well have
been called the subnet exam. About 90% of the questions were on subnetting
and mixed in with other subjects. In fact the config answers could have been
gleaned from the IP addressing. I found the simulation question impossible
at the time (although I now know what it is - I think!).

I had NO or very few questions on ISDN, WANs, Frame Relay, routing theory,
VLANs, the configurations all had IP addressing calculations mixed in. I
have studied for this exam for the past two months and I really knew my
stuff regarding theory and commands. Unfortunately the exam was MASSIVELY
skewed towards addressing (a problem I have now resolved in my revision).
Also the Richard Deal book is excellent but his practice exam questions are
far too soft to prepare you adequately - be warned.

Looking forward to the resit - and possibly getting a better balance of
questions.

K.

I have already passed the Cisco 640-821 CCNA INTRO, I was just
wondering for anyone else who took the path of Intro and ICND how hard
the ICND is compared to the intro?

Thanks


Re: Passed INTRO on to ICND
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Yea i went to www.learntosubnet.com
I also bough the Wendell odem INTRO book from Cisco Press it came w/
simulation Software. The book was only 25 bucks, in my opinion was
well worth it. I recieved the book in 3 days. However I have since
ordered the ICND book by wendell odem and it has been a week and a
half and i have not recieved it.

Anyhow, good luck on your next try.


Re: Passed INTRO on to ICND
I was expecting a lot of subnet questions and was fairly well prepared.
One thing that I found that helped a lot was writing down a table with
the magic number for each mask/# of bits.

# bits    mask    magic number
1    128    128
2    192    64
3    224    32
4    240    16
5    248    8
6    252    4
7    254    2
8    255    1

I also wrote down multiples of 16 upto 256. ie.

16
32
48
64
96
..
176
192
208
224
240
256


The reason I wrote down the multiples of 16 was because I found that
most 'hard' subnet questions were a .240, /20 or /28 network.

So if you get asked if 192.168.1.239 is a valid host in a /28 network,
you can look up and see that 239 is 1 less than 240, so it's a broadcast
address.

Or if your asked if 192.168.1.173/28 and 192.168.1.178/28 are in the
same subnet, you can see straight away that they are not.

If asked about a .224 or .192 network, then you can just look at every
2nd or 4th number in the list.



Kendo Nagasaki wrote:
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Re: Passed INTRO on to ICND
Thanks Brad excellent stuff.

In the magic number table what I found helps me is writing how many hosts
and subnets are in each mask underneath so my table looks like :-

MASK         128  192  224  240  248  252  254  255
VALUE        128   64    32    16     8      4      2      1
SUBNETS      0      2      6     14   30    62   126  254
HOSTS        126    62   30     14    6      2      0      0

To remember how many subnets and hosts I put a the 14 value (16 minus
network and b/c address) in the 240 mask and can work out the rest from
there and each side mirrors the other. e.g. 6 subnets in 224 and 6 hosts in
248. So things become realy easy when I'm asked in (practice) questions how
many hosts in a 252 mask etc. However I'm going to add the 16 multiples
table as you suggest, the thing I forgot to mention in my original post that
basically I ran out of time. These subnets really need to be solved within
77 seconds (not that I've worked it out ;-)) to leave 10 minutes for the
simulation question which I bombed on last time coz I ran out of time. These
tables can be written out before the exam clock starts ticking.

If BMoore is interested and still out there the Wendell Odell ICND book in
PDF can be found here for download http://thinkjoshua.com/download.php There
are no practice questions from the CD or anything else from the CD for that
matter, just the PDF (disclaimer - this isn't my site).

K.

I was expecting a lot of subnet questions and was fairly well prepared.
One thing that I found that helped a lot was writing down a table with
the magic number for each mask/# of bits.

# bits mask magic number
1 128 128
2 192 64
3 224 32
4 240 16
5 248 8
6 252 4
7 254 2
8 255 1

I also wrote down multiples of 16 upto 256. ie.

16
32
48
64
96
..
176
192
208
224
240
256


The reason I wrote down the multiples of 16 was because I found that
most 'hard' subnet questions were a .240, /20 or /28 network.

So if you get asked if 192.168.1.239 is a valid host in a /28 network,
you can look up and see that 239 is 1 less than 240, so it's a broadcast
address.

Or if your asked if 192.168.1.173/28 and 192.168.1.178/28 are in the
same subnet, you can see straight away that they are not.

If asked about a .224 or .192 network, then you can just look at every
2nd or 4th number in the list.



Kendo Nagasaki wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it


Re: Passed INTRO on to ICND
Adding in the number of subnets and hosts into the table is a good idea
- I didn't even think of it.



Kendo Nagasaki wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Re: Passed INTRO on to ICND
The ICND is of course by Wendell Odom.

Thanks Brad excellent stuff.

In the magic number table what I found helps me is writing how many hosts
and subnets are in each mask underneath so my table looks like :-

MASK         128  192  224  240  248  252  254  255
VALUE        128   64    32    16     8      4      2      1
SUBNETS      0      2      6     14   30    62   126  254
HOSTS        126    62   30     14    6      2      0      0

To remember how many subnets and hosts I put a the 14 value (16 minus
network and b/c address) in the 240 mask and can work out the rest from
there and each side mirrors the other. e.g. 6 subnets in 224 and 6 hosts in
248. So things become realy easy when I'm asked in (practice) questions how
many hosts in a 252 mask etc. However I'm going to add the 16 multiples
table as you suggest, the thing I forgot to mention in my original post that
basically I ran out of time. These subnets really need to be solved within
77 seconds (not that I've worked it out ;-)) to leave 10 minutes for the
simulation question which I bombed on last time coz I ran out of time. These
tables can be written out before the exam clock starts ticking.

If BMoore is interested and still out there the Wendell Odell ICND book in
PDF can be found here for download http://thinkjoshua.com/download.php There
are no practice questions from the CD or anything else from the CD for that
matter, just the PDF (disclaimer - this isn't my site).

K.

I was expecting a lot of subnet questions and was fairly well prepared.
One thing that I found that helped a lot was writing down a table with
the magic number for each mask/# of bits.

# bits mask magic number
1 128 128
2 192 64
3 224 32
4 240 16
5 248 8
6 252 4
7 254 2
8 255 1

I also wrote down multiples of 16 upto 256. ie.

16
32
48
64
96
..
176
192
208
224
240
256


The reason I wrote down the multiples of 16 was because I found that
most 'hard' subnet questions were a .240, /20 or /28 network.

So if you get asked if 192.168.1.239 is a valid host in a /28 network,
you can look up and see that 239 is 1 less than 240, so it's a broadcast
address.

Or if your asked if 192.168.1.173/28 and 192.168.1.178/28 are in the
same subnet, you can see straight away that they are not.

If asked about a .224 or .192 network, then you can just look at every
2nd or 4th number in the list.



Kendo Nagasaki wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it


Re: Passed INTRO on to ICND


http://www.weird.com/~woods/classb.html
http://www.weird.com/~woods/classc.html

I memorized both of those charts for my INTRO Exam and wrote them down
before the exam started....

If you can memorize those 2 charts and know binary and how to do the
binary AND operation you should not have ANY trouble passing the CCNA
INTRO exam.


Re: Passed INTRO on to ICND
That's a lot to remember!

I had seen these tables before and I can understand the logic behind
them. But the magic number table can be applied to any of the octets,
instead of remembering a huge table for all of class B and class C. It's
also much easier to remember and write down.

How can you work out the subnet address of 192.168.2.67/28 quickly using
the class c table?



BMoore wrote:
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Re: Passed INTRO on to ICND
Quoted text here. Click to load it

You do the boolean AND operation

you already know its going to be 192.168.2.*

so you take the binary of /28 which is   11110000 for the last octet
then you take the binary of 67 which is 01000011

you do the AND opertaion if their is a 1 and a 1 then it is a 1 if
their is a 0 and a 1 then it is a 0 or if its 0 and 0 its 0

so 11110000
+  01000011
------------------
= 01000000
subnet address = 192.168.2.64


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