Fiber to the home - What are the standards ?

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I'm in suburban Verizon country and there are Verizon trucks all over
the area these days.  I asked one of the guys what's going on and they
said they are pulling fiber. After we parted I began to think about
it.  I've heard of people in the area getting a multi-MB/sec
residential fiber connection for about $50/month, real soon now. Does
that sound right ?

Are they really going to pull fiber to every house ?  Do they do it
all at once or just on new construction and/or when  an exist
house buys the new service ?

What does the dmarc look like and what do they do with my POTS phone ?

I'd guess they put in a black box with RJ11 for POTS and RJ45 for
ethernet (served as PPPoE).  Do they need 120VAC power ?

Any other insights are appreciated.  

--

a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m

Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.


Re: Fiber to the home - What are the standards ?


Al Dykes wrote:
> I'm in suburban Verizon country and there are Verizon trucks all over
> the area these days.  I asked one of the guys what's going on and they
> said they are pulling fiber. After we parted I began to think about
> it.  I've heard of people in the area getting a multi-MB/sec
> residential fiber connection for about $50/month, real soon now. Does
> that sound right ?

Yep, the service is called FiOS. Three packages, 5/2 15/2 and 30/15?
Those are the Mbps down/up. The first (5/2) is $39.95 here is PA. the
second is about $50 and the third is something like $200/month.

> Are they really going to pull fiber to every house ?  Do they do it
> all at once or just on new construction and/or when  an exist
> house buys the new service ?

Yep, fiber to every house, all the way *to* the house. Large areas of a
central office wire center will be done at a time. Once activated,
customers will be notified they can sugn up. Initial targets are
existing ADSL customers.


> What does the dmarc look like and what do they do with my POTS phone ?

The box looks pretty much like a NID just twice as big. 8-(

The box, called an ONT (Optical Network Terminal) comes in several
configurations but the most common has 4 POTS ports, an RJ45 ethernet
port and a coax connector.

Your existing dialtone is swung over to the POTS ports, a Cat-5 run to
the router and then a short setup procedure to authenticate you on the
new FiOS network.

> I'd guess they put in a black box with RJ11 for POTS and RJ45 for
> ethernet (served as PPPoE).  Do they need 120VAC power ?

Yes, the ONT needs power. A cable is run inside and a small charger is
plugged into a 120v outlet. This keeps the internal battery charged. As
I hear it, the first battery is "on Verizon" but subsequent batteries
are "on you". A properly functioning battery can supply up to 8 hours of
run time for POTS.

I'm in Langhorne PA and the conduit work has started. Doylestown PA is
already "live" and customers are signing up. I'm told that Langhorne
will go live the end of this year or early 2006.

I can't wait.

John
--
John P. Dearing
A+, Network+, Server+
To reply: Just drop "YOURPANTS" in my address! 8-)


Re: Fiber to the home - What are the standards ?



>> Are they really going to pull fiber to every house ?  Do they do it
>> all at once or just on new construction and/or when  an exist
>> house buys the new service ?

>Yep, fiber to every house, all the way *to* the house.

But one strand, not two, from what I was told...It's one
large passive optival network... [ergo: no amps etc in the
field.]

>> What does the dmarc look like and what do they do with my POTS phone ?

>The box looks pretty much like a NID just twice as big. 8-(

>Your existing dialtone is swung over to the POTS ports, a Cat-5 run to
>the router and then a short setup procedure to authenticate you on the
>new FiOS network.

If you opt for POTS over fiber. A friend has the service & decided
to keep his POTS on the copper, at least for now.


>Yes, the ONT needs power. A cable is run inside and a small charger is
>plugged into a 120v outlet. This keeps the internal battery charged. As
>I hear it, the first battery is "on Verizon" but subsequent batteries
>are "on you". A properly functioning battery can supply up to 8 hours of
>run time for POTS.

Interesting trivia point..thanks. Guess Ma does not want to be rolling trucks
to replace batteries.




Also note that the ToS forbids all servers:

http://www.verizon.net/policies/vzcom/tos_popup.asp

    3.6 If you subscribe to Broadband Service:
    
        * You may not resell the Broadband Service, use it for high volume
    purposes, or engage in similar activities that constitute resale
    (commercial or non-commercial), as determined solely by Verizon.
        * You may connect multiple computers/devices within a single home or
    office location to your Broadband modem and/or router to access the
    Service, but only through a single Broadband account and a single IP
    address obtained from Verizon.
        * Where available, Broadband customers may use their Broadband accounts
    to connect through an analog connection, but these connections will be
    subject to usage thresholds and additional per hour and monthly charges,
    depending on the Service to which you subscribed.
        * Additional User IDs provided for Broadband customers' email boxes are
    not intended for use as dial-up connections. Any usage associated with
    additional email box User IDs will be charged the per hour rate associated
    with usage above the monthly allotment for analog Dial-up Service (where
    available). The number of mailboxes available to you depends upon the
    Service to which you have subscribed.
        * You may not use the Broadband Service to host any type of server
    personal or commercial in nature.
    
So no matter what upstream bandwidth you get, don't try to use it...



--
A host is a host from coast to coast.................wb8foz@nrk.com
& no one will talk to a host that's close........[v].(301) 56-LINUX
Unless the host (that isn't close).........................pob 1433
is busy, hung or dead....................................20915-1433


Re: Fiber to the home - What are the standards ?



>
>>Yes, the ONT needs power. A cable is run inside and a small charger is
>>plugged into a 120v outlet. This keeps the internal battery charged. As
>>I hear it, the first battery is "on Verizon" but subsequent batteries
>>are "on you". A properly functioning battery can supply up to 8 hours of
>>run time for POTS.
>
>
> Interesting trivia point..thanks. Guess Ma does not want to be rolling trucks
> to replace batteries.
>
>

This (power) is one of our biggest hang ups.  I'm on a university campus
and there are new staff and faculty houses in the plan.  It is a
'greenfield' build, and we've decided on Fiber to the Home (FTTH) for the
project.  And after going through the topology discussion (active, pon,
epon, gpon, et. al.) it has been the power solution that remains in
question.  It's interesting to see Verizons solution, which is sort of what
we had figured the phone companies would do.  We've toyed with power
supplies out in the system and running a hybrid fiber/copper for the drop,
and distributing power, then the neighborhood power supplies goes on a
generator for back-up.  Then there are no batteries to replace.

I"m curious though how the "cable is run inside".  Is the phone company
going to be installing a new 120V circuit on the customers premises?  (this
doesn't apply to our situation, 'cause we'll have that power built from the
beginning).  Part of the reason I ask is in reading the instruction manual
for the Cisco ONT, their suggestion was running the power cord from the ONT
in through a near-by window!


Re: Fiber to the home - What are the standards ?




>I"m curious though how the "cable is run inside".  Is the phone company
>going to be installing a new 120V circuit on the customers premises?  (this
>doesn't apply to our situation, 'cause we'll have that power built from the
>beginning).  Part of the reason I ask is in reading the instruction manual
>for the Cisco ONT, their suggestion was running the power cord from the ONT
>in through a near-by window!

I'm SURE there is a wallwart inside and low-voltage twisted pair is run back to
the box...

--
A host is a host from coast to coast.................wb8foz@nrk.com
& no one will talk to a host that's close........[v].(301) 56-LINUX
Unless the host (that isn't close).........................pob 1433
is busy, hung or dead....................................20915-1433


Re: Fiber to the home - What are the standards ?



>
> >> Are they really going to pull fiber to every house ?  Do they do it
> >> all at once or just on new construction and/or when  an exist
> >> house buys the new service ?
>
> >Yep, fiber to every house, all the way *to* the house.
>
> But one strand, not two, from what I was told...It's one
> large passive optival network... [ergo: no amps etc in the
> field.]
>
> >> What does the dmarc look like and what do they do with my POTS
phone ?
>
> >The box looks pretty much like a NID just twice as big. 8-(
>
> >Your existing dialtone is swung over to the POTS ports, a Cat-5 run
to
> >the router and then a short setup procedure to authenticate you on
the
> >new FiOS network.
>
> If you opt for POTS over fiber. A friend has the service & decided
> to keep his POTS on the copper, at least for now.
>
>
> >Yes, the ONT needs power. A cable is run inside and a small charger
is
> >plugged into a 120v outlet. This keeps the internal battery charged.
As
> >I hear it, the first battery is "on Verizon" but subsequent batteries
> >are "on you". A properly functioning battery can supply up to 8 hours
of
> >run time for POTS.
>
> Interesting trivia point..thanks. Guess Ma does not want to be rolling
> trucks to replace batteries.

Or more likely, they want to sell you a battery maintenance service
(like the inside wiring service) for a nice, profitable monthly fee.


[snip]




Re: Fiber to the home - What are the standards ?



[snip]

> are "on you". A properly functioning battery can supply up to 8 hours
of
> run time for POTS.
>
> I'm in Langhorne PA and the conduit work has started. Doylestown PA is
> already "live" and customers are signing up. I'm told that Langhorne
> will go live the end of this year or early 2006.
>
> I can't wait.

I'd be scared spitless.  With the vagaries of battery power, limited
battery life, and power outages a _lot_ longer than 8 hours (ice storms
and hurricanes), it would scare me to have such an unreliable system for
emergency purposes.  One rat chewing thru a fiber cable could take out a
whole city.  (Been there, done that, got the T-shirt.)

I guess the telcos figure that if you can't get POTS service, you can
just call on your cell phone.  :-P

Also, remember that even if you plug that FiOS wall wart into your own
UPS, it won't do a bit of good if the fiber concentrator down the block
has also lost power and its battery has run down.  And with that
situation, you can't run over to your neighbor's house to borrow the
phone to call and tell repair that you don't have any phone service.
Did you aver get that sinking feeling that someone has really made a big
mistake?  :-O
See this informative and scary URL for more info.
http://sffma.net/tech_info_powering.htm


> John
> --
> John P. Dearing
> A+, Network+, Server+
> To reply: Just drop "YOURPANTS" in my address! 8-)




Re: Fiber to the home - What are the standards ?


Watson A.Name - "Watt Sun, the Dark Remover" wrote:

> And with that
> situation, you can't run over to your neighbor's house to borrow the
> phone to call and tell repair that you don't have any phone service.

So, just run down to the corner and use the pay phone...  Oh wait, they're
disappearing, because no one uses them any more.  ;-)



Re: Fiber to the home - What are the standards ?


> So, just run down to the corner and use the pay phone...  Oh wait, they're
> disappearing, because no one uses them any more.  ;-)
>
Vast numbers of us the US never had a corner pay phone. Or sidewalks to
the corner. While I do have sidewalks now, a corner that MIGHT have a
pay phone is 1/2 mile away or more. :)


Re: Fiber to the home - What are the standards ?



> Watson A.Name - "Watt Sun, the Dark Remover" wrote:
>
> > And with that
> > situation, you can't run over to your neighbor's house to borrow the
> > phone to call and tell repair that you don't have any phone service.
>
> So, just run down to the corner and use the pay phone...  Oh wait,
they're
> disappearing, because no one uses them any more.  ;-)

And chances are that they get dial tone thru the same pair gain
equipment (down at the corner) that you and your neighbors get it from.
:-(

For more info see http://sffma.net/tech_info_powering.htm




Re: Fiber to the home - What are the standards ?





>Also, remember that even if you plug that FiOS wall wart into your own
>UPS, it won't do a bit of good if the fiber concentrator down the block
>has also lost power and its battery has run down.  

From what I saw, the outside plant is all passive; there's nothing
to run down.

--
A host is a host from coast to coast.................wb8foz@nrk.com
& no one will talk to a host that's close........[v].(301) 56-LINUX
Unless the host (that isn't close).........................pob 1433
is busy, hung or dead....................................20915-1433


Re: Fiber to the home - What are the standards ?



> "Watson A.Name - "Watt Sun, the Dark Remover""
>
>
>
> >Also, remember that even if you plug that FiOS wall wart into your
own
> >UPS, it won't do a bit of good if the fiber concentrator down the
block
> >has also lost power and its battery has run down.
>
> From what I saw, the outside plant is all passive; there's nothing
> to run down.
>
> --

Excellent.  Then perhaps it will eliminate this problem.
http://sffma.net/tech_info_powering.htm

Of course, you still have the problem that if one fiber strand is broken
(commonly known as backhoe fade), the whole neighborhood loses dial
tone.




Re: Fiber to the home - What are the standards ?



>
> I'm in suburban Verizon country and there are Verizon trucks all over
> the area these days.  I asked one of the guys what's going on and they
> said they are pulling fiber. After we parted I began to think about
> it.  I've heard of people in the area getting a multi-MB/sec
> residential fiber connection for about $50/month, real soon now. Does
> that sound right ?
>
> Are they really going to pull fiber to every house ?  Do they do it
> all at once or just on new construction and/or when  an exist
> house buys the new service ?
>
> What does the dmarc look like and what do they do with my POTS phone ?
>
> I'd guess they put in a black box with RJ11 for POTS and RJ45 for
> ethernet (served as PPPoE).  Do they need 120VAC power ?
>
> Any other insights are appreciated.

Since when is it De Rigeur for Americans to imitate the French and put a
space before every question mark  ?

Or are you just a hopeless Space Case  ?

What is this nasty infection that's spreading around the net  ?
That is certainly _not_ the way we learned to do it in school  !

>:-(

> --
>
> a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
>
> Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.




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