Tracert and Number of Hops

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Sometimes, things are dog slow, my provider is earthlink and it goes through
road runner's network.  The ip address is supposed to be dynamic but I have
left my cable modem off for like a day and when I turn it on, I get the same
ip address as before.  It seems sprintlink is really slow, can anything be
down about it?  Here is the tracert for a server in the usa:

 1     1 ms     2 ms     1 ms  user-10lfea9.cable.mindspring.com
[65.87.185.73]
 2     8 ms    16 ms     8 ms  10.42.32.1
 3     9 ms     9 ms    18 ms  gig2-2.rlghncj-rtr1.nc.rr.com [24.25.1.33]
 4     9 ms    12 ms     8 ms  srp5-0.rlghncg-rtr1.nc.rr.com [24.25.2.148]
 5     9 ms    19 ms    10 ms  pos1-0.rlghnca-rtr1.nc.rr.com [24.25.20.17]
 6     9 ms    12 ms    10 ms  pos14-0.rlghncrdc-rtr1.nc.rr.com [24.25.0.5]
 7     8 ms    17 ms     9 ms  son0-0-3.rlghncrdc-rtr3.nc.rr.com
[24.93.64.34]
 8    27 ms    24 ms    34 ms  so-8-1.car1.Washington1.Level3.net
[67.29.172.5]
 9    26 ms    26 ms    25 ms  ae-14-51.car4.Washington1.Level3.net
[4.68.121.17]
10    22 ms    31 ms    21 ms  sprint-level3-te.Washington1.Level3.net
[4.68.111.170]
11    22 ms    22 ms    23 ms  sl-st21-ash-5-0.sprintlink.net
[144.232.29.206]
12    25 ms    23 ms    22 ms  sl-bb26-rly-6-0.sprintlink.net
[144.232.20.135]
13    48 ms    47 ms    45 ms  sl-bb25-chi-3-0.sprintlink.net
[144.232.20.89]
14    46 ms    45 ms    48 ms  sl-bb24-chi-14-0.sprintlink.net
[144.232.26.82]
15    66 ms    67 ms    68 ms  sl-bb20-che-2-0.sprintlink.net
[144.232.20.161]
16    66 ms    65 ms    65 ms  sl-gw10-che-9-0.sprintlink.net
[144.232.15.146]
17    94 ms    95 ms    92 ms  sl-lesea-4-1-0.sprintlink.net
[144.232.141.42]
18     *        *        *     Request timed out.
19     *        *        *     Request timed out.
20     *        *        *     Request timed out.
21     *        *        *     Request timed out.
22     *        *        *     Request timed out.
23     *        *        *     Request timed out.
24     *        *        *     Request timed out.
25     *        *        *     Request timed out.
26     *        *        *     Request timed out.
27     *        *        *     Request timed out.



Re: Tracert and Number of Hops


time out is not good and anything under lets say 125ms is ok
for cable
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Re: Tracert and Number of Hops


BigJim wrote:
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Request timed out just means a response was not received. That doesn't mean
anything is wrong. A device can be up and running perfectly, but simply
configured not to respond to ICMP.

Also, the ICMP packets that are sent for pings and traceroutes are very
small. The amount of time it takes to go from point a to point b is not
related to whether you have cable, or what the bandwidth is. Having
broadband affects how much you can move at one time, not the speed at which
it moves.

Think of it this way: Dial-up like putting your data in the trunk of a Kia.
DSL is like putting your data in the back of a station wagon. Cable is like
putting your data in the back of a pick-up truck. If you're sending a lot of
data, that pick-up truck comes in handy. But if you're sending a single
number 10 envelope (your ICMP packet), the capacity of the vehicle is not an
important factor. The size of the driver's bladder is more relevant.

--
Warren H.

==========
Disclaimer: My views reflect those of myself, and not my
employer, my friends, nor (as she often tells me) my wife.
Any resemblance to the views of anybody living or dead is
coincidental. No animals were hurt in the writing of this
response -- unless you count my dog who desperately wants
to go outside now.

   Compare and buy TaxCut and TurboTax Software:
         http://www.holzemville.com/taxes /




Re: Tracert and Number of Hops


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Lol, I like that analogy but also, the pick-up truck goes faster than the
station wagon, and the station wagon faster than the kia.  However, as you
said, the driver of the pick-up may be having some bladder control issues.

. . . so, in a gaming situation, the player might hit the command 'shoot'
but the driver is still flushing the urinal . . .

-g



Re: Tracert and Number of Hops


geoff wrote:
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No. Electrons travel down copper, and light through fiber at the same speed
whatever that copper or fiber is connected to. They don't magically go
faster because they originated or are destined for a cable subscriber. Cable
networks didn't change the laws of physics.

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The driver of the pick-up may need to relieve his bladder as well. There
probably is a greater tendency for dial-up to have more latency because of
the way the client modem is connected to the modem rack at the ISP, but if
you have a low enough latency on that first hop, dial-up should be able to
send a shoot command as quickly as someone on an over-subscribed cable
network, or on DSL at the maximum distance from the CO (or if the DSLAM is
oversubscribed). (Unless the game designer has decided that a lot more
information needs to be up and downloaded, instead of being on the client
machine already.)

--
Warren H.

==========
Disclaimer: My views reflect those of myself, and not my
employer, my friends, nor (as she often tells me) my wife.
Any resemblance to the views of anybody living or dead is
coincidental. No animals were hurt in the writing of this
response -- unless you count my dog who desperately wants
to go outside now.

   Compare and buy TaxCut and TurboTax Software:
         http://www.holzemville.com/taxes /




Re: Tracert and Number of Hops


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Then if comparing it to a highway, a modem would be like a highway with 1
lane in each direction whereas a cable modem would be like a highway with 8
lanes in each direction.  However, no car is allowed to go over 60 mph.

?

-g



Re: Tracert and Number of Hops


geoff wrote:
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More or less. But not quite. Different devices, such as modems, hubs,
switches, bridges and routers, are more like toll booths and inspection
stations. The variables include how long it takes for the device to do what
it needs to do, how big of a queuing-up area there is, and how many loads
are being sent to that device.

Cars, trucks, and even mopeds will all travel at the same speed over the
physical medium. Anytime vehicles come to a device whether it is the modem
on your desk or some backbone router there will be a bottleneck. On the
backbone, traffic can be routed around some bottlenecks. (Sometimes this
happens easily and automatically. Sometimes, such as in a network
interchange point with a peering agreement between the networks, it needs to
be done manually, and possibly only after some suit makes a deal.) But the
biggest bottlenecks are usually those closest to each end point, such as the
modem sitting on your desk. Those bottlenecks can't be routed around.

Servers also aren't just pushing as much as they can as soon as you ask for
data. In TCP there are transmission control messages going back to the
source that (in the context of our shipping vehicle analogy) tell the sender
that they can dispatch another load. It can be a problem if your computer is
sending out messages saying that it can handle bigger loads than it really
can. If the queue leading to the bottleneck fills, the drivers get
frustrated, and self-district themselves and their loads.

And to carry the analogy even further, the real data in the loads are in
boxes within boxes within boxes. At some of the stops along the way,
inspection agents have to open some of the outer boxes, and then repack
them. That takes time, too. But whatever vehicle they put the load on as
they send it out, once that vehicle hits the physical medium, be it copper
or fiber, it will travel at the exact same speed as every other vehicle on
that packet.

--
Warren H.

==========
Disclaimer: My views reflect those of myself, and not my
employer, my friends, nor (as she often tells me) my wife.
Any resemblance to the views of anybody living or dead is
coincidental. No animals were hurt in the writing of this
response -- unless you count my dog who desperately wants
to go outside now.

   Compare and buy TaxCut and TurboTax Software:
         http://www.holzemville.com/taxes /




Re: Tracert and Number of Hops


geoff wrote:
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Yes. That's absolutely normal.

A dynamic IP address simply means that your IP address will only change when
the network has a need to assign you a different IP address. Until then, you
will continue to have the same IP address, even if you turn off your
equipment. But *you* can't count on when that need comes, and when the time
comes, by using DHCP, you don't have to do anything when your IP changes.


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<snipped>

I don't see a problem with what you posted. If you are having a problem,
this doesn't show it.

--
Warren H.

==========
Disclaimer: My views reflect those of myself, and not my
employer, my friends, nor (as she often tells me) my wife.
Any resemblance to the views of anybody living or dead is
coincidental. No animals were hurt in the writing of this
response -- unless you count my dog who desperately wants
to go outside now.

   Compare and buy TaxCut and TurboTax Software:
         http://www.holzemville.com/taxes /




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