RR modem quuestion

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while not 100% this group...

In my area Time Warner/Road Runner offers a digital phone service.

I have heard the the bandwidth taken by this is outside the upload/download
limts (384k up, 7meg down) on my RR connection, is this true does anyone
know?.




Re: RR modem quuestion


lars wrote:
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Not outside but takes up about 64kbit of the bandwidth. Actually it's
likely to vary between 32KB and 128KB depending on what's happening at
the time. But the later is my speculation.


Re: RR modem quuestion



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I was a Digital Phone customer while on TW in NYC, but I'm not sure
how they split the infrastucture. I do know that on Cablevision, it's
split. In other words, the bandwidth that is fed to the voice service
is provisioned separately from the data. So with them, it's possible
for the Internet service to work, and the phone be down or vice versa.

Re: RR modem quuestion



Please clarify what you mean by this statement:

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By this are you asking whether 384k up / 7meg down is enough bandwidth
to satisfy the VOIP requirements?  Or are you asking if the VOIP
signal has no impact on the Internet bandwidth, much like the TV
signal that shares the same copper, but works on a completely
different frequency.

A_C






Re: RR modem quuestion


Agent_C wrote:
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I am asking if the telephony is totally outside and has no impact on the
interent.. or viceversa...



Re: RR modem quuestion


"I am asking if the telephony is totally outside and has no impact on
the
interent.. or viceversa... "

Well, the answer depends on what they using. For the past several
years, phone over cable systems were switched digital phone systems.
The cable company would mount a box called a NIU or some other acronym,
that would have a cable connection and a phone wire block. It would
connect to the cable drop before anything else on the line and pass
through signal for television or internet. This would connect to a 5ESS
switch, just like the baby bells use, and was switched data, meaning
64Kbps all the time. It uses different upstream and downstream
bandwidth from the Internet traffic. They were sometimes powered by the
cable system, sometimes from a battery backup on site.

Now, many cable companies are moving to VoIP systems that run on the
current Internet infrastructure they've built for the high speed
internet. They use a special cable modem that has 2 phone jacks on the
back, next to the Ethernet and USB ports:
http://www.arrisi.com/products_solutions/product_families/Touchstone/telephony_modems.asp
http://broadband.motorola.com/catalog/productdetail.asp?ProductID=388
These do share the bandwidth used in the house, usually not that much
though. They also require a battery backup for lifeline service, which
at some point may stop working and I'm sure will requie a technician to
come out and replace.

The best thing to do is call in and ask what all is involved in an
installation. In some areas I'm sure they are running both systems at
the same time, with the idea of eliminating the switched service at
some point, so that's yet another thing to consider.


Re: RR modem quuestion



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I recently had TW Digitalphone(VoIP) installed.  The modem is the
Motorola SBV5220 on the site linked to above.  TW didn't install the
batteries, nor provide them. When I called, they stated that they
weren't installing them in any of their installations as during a power
outage the network would probably be down anyway.

I am behind a NAT router and my internet IP didn't change.  The modem is
between the TW cable and the router.  I think(don't know) that the modem
issues two IPs so perhaps the bandwidth isn't shared.  I do know that if  
the phone is in use, I can still download a huge file from a fast server
as fast as before.  Granted, that is just a subjective observation with
no measurement other than Firefox's Download window showing 768KB during
download.  RR is capped here at 7Mbit down, 384Kb up.  Again, I'm
guessing on all this.

Also, TW is doing something a little different with their VoIP.  The
phone call is handled by TW network initially, but is routed the either
MCI or Sprint for the majority of the call over their phone network.  I
think that virtually all phone companies do VoIP after a certain point
on their network, so as to reduce the cost of long distance calls.  That
way they avoid a dedicated connection spanning a long distance.


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Re: RR modem quuestion


"When I called, they stated that they
weren't installing them in any of their installations as during a power
outage the network would probably be down anyway. "

Wow. Yet another chance for the bells to market negitive preceptions
about cable, this time about network uptime and lifeline service. I
find it very iresponsible of TW to sell a VoIP service that doesn't
have any power backup available, if this statement is true.

Unfortunatly, since most of the world thinks of cable as unreliable
(reputation deserved in some cases), I'll get to read  years of "cable
telephone goes down all the time, so the bells service is fundamentally
superior" postings in the newsgroups, just like I got to read years of
"cable internet service is slower the more people are on it, while DSL
is DEDICATED(?) back to the CO and therefore is superior" comments just
because @Home corporation didn't want to get a decent circuit to their
backbone and some clever marketing campaigns to exploit the flaw.
Hopefully the CSSR the poster spoke with was misinformed, but who knows
for sure. There is a chance that this is a localized problem, maybe the
local office ran out of battery packs or something.


Re: RR modem quuestion


@v46g2000cwv.googlegroups.com:

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power
fundamentally
just
knows
the

I personally don't think it is much of an issue.  When Northeastern US
had the major power outage a few years ago in mid summer, everything
went down.  Where I live, the power came back on within less than 2
hours while in other areas it took several days to return to service.

I could get on the internet via RR as soon as power returned, but the
phone was still down for several hours.  This was a regular POTS line
from Verizon.  So much for their claims.

I did consider purchasing the batteries fro Motorola myself, but my wife
and I have cell phones, which of course may or may not work.  TW and the
cell phones have E9ll services.  Vonage and some of the others
supposedly still don't.  After a certain date, without E911 such
services were to stop service but there was a waiver.??
 


Re: Re: RR modem quuestion


wrote:

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It's interesting how that apparently varies by region. In New York
City, voice circuits were fully functional during the 1965, 1977 and
2003 blackouts.

A_C






Re: Re: RR modem quuestion



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Normally, that was the case here when we had local outages.  Evidently
the large scale outage left Verizon without Edison power and the backup
power was offline.  When Edison came back online, somehow power wasn't
restored to Verizon's POTS circuits.

Of course, systems being in poor repair and/or offline was what caused
the problems at First Energy near Cleveland, Ohio which ultimately
brought down the entire Northeast power grid.

Unless we are beating drums, I guess any modern communications are
vulnerable at one point or another.  Even smoke signals can be at the
whim of heavy winds.<G>


Re: Re: RR modem quuestion



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Indeed, I've read several reviews that suggest VoIP will work with
very slow broadband connections; including the $14.95 package Verizon
is offering.

This test may be helpful to the OP:
http://www.voipreview.org/voipspeedtester.aspx

A_C




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