Cable Splitter Specs

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The previous Comcast "installer" showed up with a two-way splitter that
had the appearance of being mass-purchased at a Chinese garage sale. No
indications as to bandpass  or to db losses in each output.  Anyway, he
was unable to complete the high-speed Internet connection, and left with
the splitter still in his pocket.

In our local electronics shop, I've seen two-way RCA digital splitters,
5 MHz to 1 GHx, with -3.5 db loss claimed for each output, and another
splitter claiming 5 MHz to 2.3 GHz.

Which (or what) should I look for (splitter specs) when the next
"installer" comes to hook up my high-speed Internet connection?

BTW: Our home is already completely wired with RG6, and I've tested each
outlet, using a TV set from Channel 2 to Channel 99, to ensure good
connections.

TIA

George

--
I know that you believe that you understood what you think I said, but I am
not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.
            -- Robert McCloskey, State Department spokesman (attributed)


Re: Cable Splitter Specs


1A97FD.16495110092005@news101.his.com:

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that

Well these days everything is made in China ... : )


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splitters,

1GHz splitter is good enough for digital cable.
2Ghz splitters are used for digital satellite TV.


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Use a 1ghz splitter. Home Depot has Ideal splitters for ~3.00USD.

However, if you signal is weak, you may beed a 1ghz bi-directional
amplifier. Radioshack has some decent 1ghz amps for ~20USD or less.

eBay is another good place to look - search for Electroline amps, I
picked up a couple for ~10 - 15.00 each.

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Testing from Channel 2 to 99 only tests the quality of the lower bands
which analog CATV uses. So while analog TV may work fine... digital
cable is more pick.




--
Lucas Tam (REMOVEnntp@rogers.com)
Please delete "REMOVE" from the e-mail address when replying.

Newmarket Volvo Sucks! http://newmarketvolvo.tripod.com


Re: Cable Splitter Specs


Lucas Tam wrote:

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I've got some china that was made in England.   ;-)



Re: Cable Splitter Specs


Lucas Tam wrote:
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Just to clarify, Comcast has started digital simulcasting the lower band
analog channels.  A digital cable box is required.

Q

Q





Re: Cable Splitter Specs


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Just to clarify your clarification, a digital cable box is only needed if
you want to watch the digital version of the channel.  Simulating means that
the analog versions are still there, and can still be received by any cable
ready consumer equipment.

This also varies by market, as Comcast has not turned on digital simulating
in all of their markets.

-Gary




Re: Cable Splitter Specs


REMOVEnntp@rogers.com says...
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  Digital can use any frequency. Some digital channels on my system are
on 117MHz, analog 99, which is just below analog 14 in the complicated
channel/frequency relationship (2-4, 5-6, 95-99, 14-22, 7-13, 23-94,
100-xxx).

 The channel numbers on a cable box can be programmed to anything,
analog or digital. As mentioned elsewhere, Digital Simulcasting is being
rolled out at various levels across the country. The box can be
programmed to use the digital version instead of the analog when you
choose a channel. This isn't limited to digital. Numbers for analog
channels can point to different analog frequencies that 'standard.'

--
If there is a no_junk in my address, please REMOVE it before replying!
All junk mail senders will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the
law!!
http://home.att.net/~andyross


Re: Cable Splitter Specs



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The Comcast version of the Motorola 6000 series DVR autoselects the
digital simulcast on the 'analog' channels.




Re: Cable Splitter Specs


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The box does not automatically select anything.  The headend sends a
"channel map" to each and every digital set-top box.  The channel map
establishes the relationship between logical channel numbers and actual
frequencies.  The map says if the channel is analog or digital.  For digital
channels, it also identifies the individual streams within an RF channel.

When a user selects a channel number, the box consults the channel map to
determine what frequency to tune to.  If the channel is analog, the box uses
the analog demodulator and to recover the signal.  If the channel is
digital, the digital demodulator and decryptor are used.  Further, the
channel map identifies the stream within the digital channel for the
selected program.

When a digital simulcast is used, the analog program stays on the same
frequency its always been on.  This way, cable ready TVs and VCRs can
continue to access it on the same channel number.  The digital version of
the program is on a different frequency, but the channel map causes the
set-top box to make it appear at the same logical channel number.

Note that an RF channel can carry 6 or more standard definition video
programs in digital format.  This is why cable companies really want to
switch to all digital, as it allows for more services with the same number
of RF channels.

If you're unsure if a particular channel is analog or digital, use the
Motorola diagnostics to figure out what is going on.  Tune to a channel,
turn the box off and within 5 seconds press "ok/select" on the remote.  This
will get you into the diagnostic menu.  "Inband Status" provides information
on the last channel tuned, including if it is analog or digital
(QAM64/QAM256).

-Gary




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The digital box autoselect the digital simulcasting.

Q




Re: Cable Splitter Specs


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No, it doesn't.  The decision to select the digital version of a simulcasted
channel is made in the head-end, not in the set-top box.

-Gary




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wrote:

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Based on the customer's account settings?

--
Bill


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Not exactly.  By definition, if you have a digital box, it is capable of
watching the digital version of a simulcasted channel.  If you don't have a
box, then all your TV can get is the analog version.

So, if you've subscribed to a service that includes a digital box, you'll
get to watch the digital channels.  Any TVs that use their internal tuners
will get the analog version.

-Gary




Re: Cable Splitter Specs


wrote:

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Cool, thanks.

--
Bill


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