CAT5e wiring question

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Hello,

I will soon be wiring a home network in my home, pulling a bunch of
cat5e cables through the walls to a patch panel in the basement.  My
question is, before I start pulling the cables, are there any rules of
thumb to be wary of?  Like don't run them next to electric wires or
coax or speaker wires, etc.  Any thoughts appreciated.

Thanks!
Tom

Re: CAT5e wiring question


Tom M wrote:
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Cross, but do not parallel them close to power. Don't kink them - smooth bends.



Re: CAT5e wiring question


You may also want to consider Cat6 cables. Gigabit is becoming popular and
cat5 doesn't handle gigabit too well over longer runs. It also sheilds
better as the twists are tighter.



Cross, but do not parallel them close to power. Don't kink them - smooth
bends.



Tom M wrote:
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Re: CAT5e wiring question


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I thought about cat6.  What is the cost compare and I assume I
wouldn't have any problems with older equipment on them?

Thanks
Tom

Re: CAT5e wiring question


Not sure about the price difference. I believe when I saw it it was about
30% more.

OTOH: I have a run of cat5 in my new home about 40-50 feet long to the
switch / router. My new media computer does a cable length test on the LAN
system and determines the length. It then authorizes the LAN card to use
Gigabit. It appears to work just fine, so far.

You may want to run cheaper cable on shorter runs. Who knows what will come
in the next few years though? 10Gbit Ethernet?

The Gbit is nice as it actually runs my 100Mbit machine at 93Gbits/sec when
crossloading to the 1Gbit machine. With two 100Mbit machines crossloading
movies would only run at about 40Mbits/sec.



I thought about cat6.  What is the cost compare and I assume I
wouldn't have any problems with older equipment on them?

Thanks
Tom


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Re: CAT5e wiring question


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Perfect, just what I was looking for.

Thanks!

Re: CAT5e wiring question


In agreement with Steve, TV signals may not be broadcast on coax in the
future. I am already using a LAN storage HDD and a media PC to display on my
bigscreen TV/monitor over ethernet. A bedroom unit will be installed
sometime to access the movies/music/ books etc. Perhaps one in the kitchen.
Wife likes to download recipes and email while cooking. (yumm)

Multimedia boxes are getting popular and cheap as are "slingboxes" to
distribute your media storage database, as well as Internet around the house
over Ethernet. Spend a few extra bucks. You may regret not doing it. I ran
most of mine cat5 a few years ago and alrady I can see it was a "cheap out"
mistake.

Dual coax to some spots is a good idea, also. Dish in / RG-59 (sp?) out to
the "watch the rest in bed" TV from the PVR.


Unless you want to go back and do it again, run way more CAT6 (yes, use
it!) than you think you need, especially if you aren't running coax
(RG-6 quad shield) or HDMI for video. Lots of stuff can be run over
spare CAT6 runs (video, audio, power, etc.)

Steve

--
steve <at> w0x0f <dot> com
"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of
arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to
skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, sidecar in the other, body
thoroughly
used up, totally worn out and screaming "WOO HOO what a ride!"



Re: CAT5e wiring question



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I actually ran 4x coax (RG-6 quad-shield and one RG-59) from the rack to
most rooms, as my runs are no longer accessible--entombed in the walls
with no ceiling or basement access possible--so I was hesitant to rely
on HDMI. I've had too many HDMI cables go bad. So I am using a mix of
component video (fine up to 1080p) for across-the-house and HDMI for
in-room, and slowly moving to IP-based.

Steve

--
steve <at> w0x0f <dot> com
"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of
arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to
skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, sidecar in the other, body thoroughly
used up, totally worn out and screaming "WOO HOO what a ride!"

Re: CAT5e wiring question


On Wed, 12 May 2010 11:09:23 -0700 (PDT), Tom M

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Use cat6 (Use 6e if it is a standard now).

Always put in two of each type of cable to each location.
For example, coax, Ethernet, fiber optic)  Second run is for
loopback testing and for when you find your phone company and
cable company each need separate Ethernet, etc.

If you do fiber optic, use single mode fiber optic.  Single mode
cables will work with multi-mode hardware for the short distances you
are likely to have in a home.  * * *Someone should say what type
of connectors to use * * *There were 4 main choices in 2004 when I
wired my house - two sizes and separate/combined for the two
directions - I don't know which of the 4 if preferable.  Fiber
connections should be factory made or made by REAL expert, even if the
cables are 2 or 3 times longer that why.  (Fiber is good for
kilometers rather than meters like Ethernet, so better to have good
connections.  For cost and neatness reasons you probably want less
than 50% extra length.)

Use "best" coax consistent with cable company requirements.  Often
this is outdoors rated cable.  

If you run coax, use coax with (low voltage DC) power line included,
but use "best" signal rated if can't get both best signal rated
and low voltage DC in same cable.  If don't have (low voltage DC)
power with coax, run separate power cable.


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Re: CAT5e wiring question


What would one do with fibre optic inside a house? Even the fibre optic
companies convert to copper and back in their POP sites.



If you do fiber optic, use single mode fiber optic.  Single mode
cables will work with multi-mode hardware for the short distances you
are likely to have in a home.  * * *Someone should say what type
of connectors to use * * *There were 4 main choices in 2004 when I
wired my house - two sizes and separate/combined for the two
directions - I don't know which of the 4 if preferable.  Fiber
connections should be factory made or made by REAL expert, even if the
cables are 2 or 3 times longer that why.  (Fiber is good for
kilometers rather than meters like Ethernet, so better to have good
connections.  For cost and neatness reasons you probably want less
than 50% extra length.)



Re: CAT5e wiring question


wrote:

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When we did out house in 2004 it looked like fiber optic 10GHz
"Ethernet" cards were going to be available for a reasonable cost
in a couple of years (i.e., by 2006) and would be useful for Ethernet
based storage as well as video.

I need to update my computers to support 10Gb network speeds, so
I haven't looked at 10Gb "Ethernet" cards in a long time and don't
know if fiber is yet the best option for 10Gb.  However, the
single-mode fiber optics cables will still be available for use
if in 20 years 100Gb or higher is appropriate; twisted pair or
coax that was available in 2004 is unlikely to work at those
speeds, so I may still use the fiber even though I stopped using
it after testing the installation in 2004.

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Re: CAT5e wiring question


Inside a building, for runs under 50m, fibre optics make no sense. If copper
can't do it, converting to fibre won't either.

Are you running striped drive storage? What electronics can even support
that speed?

Backbones of small multi-city fibre optic companies, I worked with, only ran
155Mbit (OC3) backbones to feed most of the ISPs in a 750K people area. My
you, that was Internet that isn't that fast to each customer anyway.


When we did out house in 2004 it looked like fiber optic 10GHz
"Ethernet" cards were going to be available for a reasonable cost
in a couple of years (i.e., by 2006) and would be useful for Ethernet
based storage as well as video.

I need to update my computers to support 10Gb network speeds, so
I haven't looked at 10Gb "Ethernet" cards in a long time and don't
know if fiber is yet the best option for 10Gb.  However, the
single-mode fiber optics cables will still be available for use
if in 20 years 100Gb or higher is appropriate; twisted pair or
coax that was available in 2004 is unlikely to work at those
speeds, so I may still use the fiber even though I stopped using
it after testing the installation in 2004.


wrote:

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Re: CAT5e wiring question


wrote:

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I was building in 2004 and wanted the in-wall stuff to support 2034
technology.   Single-mode fiber would work with multi-mode 1gb cards
that I could afford in 2004.

I expected 10gb copper would be affordable by 2009, but I also
expected 10gb fiber to be affordable by 2009. (As it turns out,
Intel's 10gb Light Peak Technology should be able to run over the
cables that I have in the walls, although the ends probably have
to be cut, etc.)

I didn't expect 1tb copper using 2004's "Cat6E" to be available even
by 2020, but I expected 1tb and higher single-mode fiber stuff to
work with the 2004 single-mode fiber.

There was no coax or tri-axial "radio" type cable that seemed like
THE way to go for higher frequency RF stuff, so I just made the
best guess that I could for what my local existing cable company would
support and went with it.  I turned out to make the wrong choice of
cable type because Optimum wouldn't give me a straight answer,
only saying "type X will work", not "type Y is what we use when we
don't want to have to keep replacing the cable every couple of
years." (F.Y.I. in about 2000 the cable company serving Santa Clara,
California was very helpful.  The actually were setup to sell good
cable for short runs and great cable for long runs and even used their
non-portable super-duper cable-connector-installer machine to put the
connections on the cables that I bought from them in San Jose near
the Fairgrounds.  Optimum in Westchester in 2004 was only willing to
say "oh, you should have used type Z", where even type Z isn't the
actual best choice.
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